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I worked on the 77th floor of World Trade Center Tower 2. AMA

Sep 10th 2016 by BDMayhem • 13 Questions • 192 Points

I posted this earlier in an AskReddit thread that was inexplicably removed. It seemed to be interesting to some people, so I thought I'd add it here.

Here's my story about the day of September 11, 2001.

For a few weeks in late August and early September 2001, my (now ex) girlfriend had been having fainting spells on the subway, so on September 10, she went to a doctor who told her to drink more water and be sure to have breakfast before she went to work. On the 11th, we woke up early so we could have breakfast together. Of course, since any shift in schedule is unpredictable, I left 5-10 minutes later than I normally would have.

As the N train approached the Cortlandt St. stop (which was inside the WTC) the conductor announced that we would be bypassing that stop due to a "smoky condition". Several people groaned, but I distinctly remember making eye contact with the woman in the seat directly across from mine, and our glance said, "Oh, well. What are you going to do? It could be worse."

I got off at Rector St. and looked up the tracks; there definitely was smoke filling up the tunnel. When I got up to street level, there were papers, some singed or charred, falling all over. People were confused. Sirens blared. I thought that it would be best to stay out of everyone's way and get to work.

Downtown NYC is built like a maze with high walls, so I had to walk a few blocks just to get my bearings. I had only been in the city for about a year, so my uptown/downtown sense was largely based on finding the WTC or the Empire State Building--if you know what street you're on, and you find either one of those, you know which way is which. So I found the right clearing of buildings and saw my office in flames.

By then, the second plane had hit, so both buildings were blazing, but I had no idea what was going on. I figured that it was just a fire--nothing so odd; sometimes there are fires in buildings, right? I thought to myself, I wonder how long it will be before we can go back to the office? Looking again, I guessed that it was pretty close to the 77th floor, but still I wasn't all that concerned. I was a bit confused as to why both buildings were burning, but I knew I'd find out soon enough.

I decided to walk to my gf's office in SoHo. I knew that news of a fire at the WTC would move quickly, but I hoped that I could get there before she heard about it. I would have called, but lines at every payphone were 10 or more people deep, and it was before everyone in the world had a cell phone. So I walked. The long way, around City Hall. I didn't want to be in any first responder's way.

The worst part, and I'm hesitant to write this, because I hate even admitting that I had to witness this, is that before I started to walk to her office, I stood watching the fire. Then someone jumped. I didn't believe what I saw, and I was still watching when two more people jumped. That's when I put my head down and left.

On the way, I walked with dedication, with purpose. I had to show my gf that I was all right. But I was sickened by the thought that people, possibly my friends and coworkers, had to make such an awful decision. I walked faster.

People on the streets were taking photos and video. I wanted to tell them to stop, that photos wouldn't do anyone any good, but I couldn't, because I knew that I'd probably think the same way if I didn't have such a close relationship with that building.

I reached her office around 10 am. I still didn't know what had happened, and I didn't fully understand the urgency with which her coworkers hurried me to her desk. When I got near her desk, where most of the people know who I was and where I worked, they broke into applause. I held her for several minutes before I learned anything about any planes.

At that point, my only priority was to call my parents. Of course, that wasn't easy because Arizona had just changed all of its area codes, and her office's phone system would not accept outgoing calls to unknown area codes. So we called everyone we knew and asked them to call my parents for me. I now have several people across the country, some of whom I've never met, that I will always cherish for making one phone call.

There were rumors about other planes and other landmarks. I heard that the Pentagon had been hit by a plane. I heard the Supreme Court building was in ruins. There was talk of gas leaks and explosions, even a troops on the ground type invasion. I heard that Tower 2, my building, had collapsed. I didn't know what to believe. Facts wouldn't be sorted out until much later. Two other friends of ours, who also lived in our Queens neighborhood, met up with us at my gf's office, and we sat there, not knowing what to do at all. By 1 pm, we decided to go to lunch. Amazingly, restaurants in SoHo were still open. I had a burger.

The trains were not yet running so we started walking uptown. The streets were frighteningly still. No cars, very few pedestrians. We walked up to 34th St when we heard that some trains were running again. We caught an F to Queens, and I talked to my parents around 4 pm. I had still heard nothing of any my coworkers. By 8, a bunch of people congregated at a friend's apartment. No one wanted to be alone. When I finally got in touch with a coworker, all but 4 from my company had been accounted for. Soon after, no one could stand watching the same footage over and over, so we put in children's movies. I fell asleep on a futon with 4 other people watching The Great Muppet Caper. The next morning, I got a parking ticket. I'm still mad about that.

My company, amazingly, lost only 4 people that day. We had the entire 77th floor and part of the 78th floor. The last people out said that they saw part of the wing in the 78th floor conference room as they left.

My immediate coworkers were already down in the 40s, taking the stairs down when the plane hit our building. They saw what happened to the north tower, and despite instructions from the building management, they decided to get out.

I had it easy. I always knew that I was fine. My gf, my parents, and tons of people all over the country knew that I worked in the WTC, and they had to spend the day worrying about me. I received hundreds of emails and phone calls over the next couple of weeks from people just saying they were happy to hear that they I was okay and that they loved me. I feel I played an important role in humanizing the whole catastrophe for those people. It's easy to brush off a number like 3,000, but it's impossible to brush off someone you know, even if that someone is just a close call.

Proof: My business card: http://i.imgur.com/C7WFlhy.jpg

My second paystub (the first was actually a check I had to deposit) http://i.imgur.com/Wu2tGpt.jpg

Q:

So what happened to your workplace after the attack? Did your company switch buildings immediately or was there time?

A:

It took about a week for the upper management to get things organized, and then operations moved to the small office in Philly. For about 2-3 months, people had the choice to work from home or work in Philly. Many people choose to do that, as all expenses were covered, including a room at a 4 star hotel and meals wherever you wanted. The one time I did that, we had dinner at Morimoto, which ran about $100/person, not including drinks. After the first week, the company had to cut off paying for everyone's alcohol.

In December or January, we got a new permanent office in the West Village. 6th floor. People were very happy to be closer to the ground.


Q:

I can't even imagine going through something like that, and your story really helps me get a sense of what 9/11 was like for those closest to it.

I only barely remember it from when I was about 5 years old, seeing it on the news and all. My friends and I will sometimes lightheartedly make jokes about it, as with many others from my generation. If you don't mind me asking, how do you feel about 9/11 jokes/memes, as someone who experienced it firsthand?

A:

I understand the need for jokes. Many of my friends are comedians, and we almost all use humor to work through difficult situations. I know I made plenty of tasteless jokes about the Challenger, Oklahoma city, the Unabomber, etc., etc. in my youth. I can't really blame people for making jokes.


Q:

How did you get a parking ticket if you took subway trains the whole time? Or is it just something unrelated that made you angry the next day?

A:

I drove from my apartment in Queens to my friend's place, where we spent the night watching Muppet movies. The car had to be moved for street cleaning by 8am. I got the ticket at 8:06.


Q:

Didn't mean to come across accusatory, it sounds like you train to/from work but still drive around in the neighborhood. Seems reasonable enough, and the city probably should have been a bit more lenient about ticket writing the day after.

A:

That's how I felt. You'd think every city employee would have had SOMETHING better to do that morning than hand out parking tickets.


Q:

First off, I would like to thank you for doing this AMA, I know this time can get very difficult for those involved. Can you possibly give me some insight as to your emotions (and reactions) prior to, during, and after the attacks?

A:

Prior to, I was really proud to be working at the WTC. I was a quiet kid from rural Arizona, and my first job out of college was in one of the most famous landmarks in the country. I knew about the 1993 attack, but I, like virtually everyone else, couldn't imagine something of this magnitude ever happening.

During the attacks, I was oblivious. I sincerely thought there was some freak accident that caused the fire(s). It never crossed my mind that it could have been intentional.

After, though, what emotion didn't I have? Fear, hate, rage, confusion, sympathy. For a few weeks after, it wasn't uncommon to find myself crying for no apparent reason, just being overwhelmed by emotions.

The strongest reaction, and this was at least city-wide, was just being nice to people. Everyone held doors for each other, said thank you, refrained from pushing to get on a crowded subway car, moved out of the way on the sidewalk. It was like everyone suddenly realized that all the people around them were real, with feelings and loved ones waiting for them. There was a great sense of goodwill throughout the city.

That's what I wish we could capture, and I wish it didn't take thousands of people dying to make it happen.


Q:

Have there been any stories from your coworkers who were in the building that really stuck with you?

A:

Okay, I'll do happy, sad, and weird.

One of the data integrity managers was kind of a jerk. He was the guy who took smoke breaks in the stairwell and yelled--literally yelled--at his employees when they were late. But he was our floor's fire warden, and when the shit hit the fan, he was on his game. He personally saw that another one of his employees, who was very pregnant, made it down every step and out the building safely.

The admin team took charge of all the executives, just like they do on any other day. As they were all on their way out the door, the phone rang, and one amazing woman, Jill Campbell, turned around to answer it and told everyone she would catch up. She had a 10 month old son at home who will never know her.

My immediate coworkers noped their way down the stairs at the first sign of trouble in Tower 1, and one of them left her purse at her desk. Several months later, she got it back, or at least parts of its contents. She showed us the partially melted WTC ID card.


Q:

This may or may not be a silly question, but seeing how every person reacts differently to traumatic events, did you get formally diagnosed with PTSD? If so, how did you cope?

Also, in the months following, did you feel America wrapped a warm blanket of love and support around you and your coworkers/fellow NYC residents? Or was it out of sight, out of mind?

A:

No, I never saw a professional. My company did bring in a team of counselors who we could see, but I didn't feel a need.

But I did take action to cope. I gave my friends and family the attention and love they deserved. I smiled to strangers. I gave blood. I empathized with my fellow humans.

I think a lot of NY did the same. Remember the blackout in 2003? I honestly don't think that would have gone over so peacefully before 9/11. For a while, New Yorkers acted as nicely as Southerners, except they actually meant the niceness.

We felt the warm blanket of love. The outpouring was amazing.


Q:

So you ever hear people talk about it and they say things that make you angry?

A:

These days it's mostly politicians, using it for political purposes. That makes me angry.


Q:

What are your thoughts about 9/11 jokes. People say "oh it's 15 years ago get over it" but is it still too soon?

A:

I'll takes jokes over conspiracy theories any day of the week.

People process things through humor. It helps. Laughing is a good thing.

But if you're going to tell a 9/11 joke, make sure it's funny. Most aren't.


Q:

I imagine you feel grateful and lucky to be alive. Aside from that, did you ever struggle with guilt knowing that you could have just as easily been one of the people in that building that didn't make it out alive?

A:

No, I don't think I ever experienced guilt. I certainly thought about the randomness, how chance could have changed so many things for better or worse for so many people, including me. But then you think, there's risk all around us. It's a miracle we aren't all killed in car crashes. All we can do is cherish the time we have and the people we have to spend it with. Because you never know what's going to happen.


Q:

What was the frequency of your pay? Even if you got paid weekly, that seems low for NYC in finance.

A:

I was an entry level research editor with a degree in creative writing. They wanted people to write and edit company bios, and as a 23 year old kid who desperately needed a job, I jumped at the chance to make $32k/year.


Q:

[deleted]

A:

I sincerely doubt it.

Edit: The question was "Was it an inside job?"


Q:

[deleted]

A:

I haven't heard anything about that. As far as I could tell, everything was perfectly normal on the 10th.