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BusinessI am Rochelle Eisen, President of Canadian Organic Growers, Ask me Anything about Canadian Organics!

Sep 23rd 2016 by CanadianOrganic • 39 Questions • 314 Points

We are:

  • Paige O’Hara - In addition to her acting work for Disney Animation, Paige’s career began on Broadway and includes lots of opera, concerts and recordings. She is also a talented artist whose oil paintings are available from the Disney Fine Art Collectors Editions

  • Richard White – While perhaps best known to Disney fans the world over for voicing Gaston, Richard is has also appeared on Broadway and in Opera. Most recently he starred as Sir Danvers Carew in the national tour and Broadway revival of Jekyll and Hyde.

*NOTE: Robby Benson is feeling a bit under the weather and unable to participate. He sends his apologies.

Proof: https://twitter.com/beourguest/status/777986256844181504

Here’s Beauty and the Beast 25th Anniversary Edition trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOjJk6vW2jM

Walt Disney Pictures’ magical animated classic “Beauty and the Beast” broke new ground as the first animated feature film to receive an Academy Award® nomination, and twenty-five years later audiences of all ages continue to fall in love with this enchanting tale, its captivating characters and unforgettable, award-winning music score and original song, “Beauty and the Beast.”

In honor of the film’s 25th anniversary, this “tale as old as time” is now available as a Walt Disney Signature Collection Edition on Blu-ray™, DVD, Digital HD and Disney Movies Anywhere.

FROM PAIGE AND RICHARD: Thank you for all the great questions today! Hope to talk to chat with you all again soon! Enjoy the new Blu-ray and the wonderful new bonus features - available right now!

Q:

Why the continued prohibition on parallel crop production in the Canadian Organic Standard, when no such restriction exists for processors, nor for U.S. crop producers?

A:

Of all the food you have been offered, have you ever refused a certain type of food?


Q:

Do you guys still remember all of your lines?

Cause I totally have all of your lines memorized haha

A:

Wow.. another great and hard question. The Canadian General Standards Board's Organic Technical Committee were divided and therefore parallel prohibition for annual crops remains in place until a more fulsome petition is submitted that is sufficiently convincing and sways the members of the Technical Committee to vote in favour of allowing parallel production.


Q:

Never. I think it's my duty as a guest to always accept when my host is offering a good thing. When people are expressing themselves by what they offer, I feel it's my duty to if necessary take one for the team. It's what I call a "grandma rule"; I may not like grandma's turkey, but I'm in grandma's house, I'm gonna eat it. And I'm gonna smile and say I like it. I think that's just good manners.

If you treat me like an idiot though and serve me crap with utter contempt. I can spiral into a serious depression for days and I will not be nice about it. This means you, Johnny Rockets.

A:

Paige: haha, good for you! LOL. They come and go at my age.


Q:

How would you interpret the new standards in terms of using black plastic mulch for garlic production--in the ground from roughly October to July where I farm.

A:

What are your comfort foods?


Q:

If you had to get turned into an object and live in the Beasts castle what would you, and wouldn't you, want to be turned into?

A:

I assume you are asking if garlic would be considered an annual crop vs a perennial crop. In my mind garlic is categorized as a annual crop and therefore impacted by the prohibition imposed on black plastic. Not sure I have answered your question.


Q:

I have an unholy and guilty attraction to fast-food macaroni and cheese. During the morning I get these horrendous cravings for Popeye's mac and cheese, and, uh, I will often disguise myself to try to slip into Popeyes. Or in a pinch, I will even go to the Colonel. There, I admit it. And I'm always recognized.

I hate Twitter, because immediately they take a picture of me holding the evidence in my hand. It's like getting caught coming out of a porn shop with a video in your arms. Very embarrassing.

A:

Richard: Obviously, a portrait of Gaston


Q:

Can you explain what type of work Resilient Solutions Consulting does? Do you have plans for the Marijuana boom when it is legalized?

A:

What food trend do you want to see die quickly? And what would you like to see become a food trend?


Q:

Do people ever recognize your voices without being told who you played?

A:

We are a joint venture group of 3 women with a wide range of organic experiences. Brenda Frick is an agrologist / inspector - specialty in grain; Gunta Vitins is a marketing / business guru; and I am a standards / accreditation geek. Marijuana currently cannot be certified under the Canadian Organic Standards as the current regulation does not extend to non-food, feed or seed products. Once the regulation is expanded then organic marijuana could be certified. Getting the regulation expanded though is s slow process.


Q:

I would like to see the pumpkin spice craze drowned in its own blood. Quickly. Juice--I don't understand the juice cleanse. I mean, if you've ever had a colonoscopy, the doctor gives you something that will cleanse you right quick, so I don't really understand juice cleanses. I believe celiac disease is a very serious ailment, and if you're diagnosed with it, I'm pleased that there are now gluten-free options, but these people who are treating gluten as, you know, an equivalent of Al Qaeda are worrying to me. So, I'm uneasy about that.

Also, overuse of the word "artisanal". You know, an artisanal potato chip? What does that mean other than it's an expensive potato chip? Oh, I'm also no big fan of the judgmental barista and beer nerds. I mean, I like a good craft, but don't make me feel bad about my beer choices. You know what kind of beer I like? I like cold beer.

I would like people really to pay more for top-quality Mexican food. I think it's the most undervalued, underappreciated world cuisine with tremendous, tremendous potential. These are in many cases really complex, wonderful sauces; particularly from Oaxaca, for instance, that date back from before Europe. I'm very excited about the possibilities for that cuisine, and I think we should pay more attention to it, learn more about it, and value it more. This is frankly a racist assumption that Mexican food or Indian food should be cheap. That's not right.

A:

Richard: Yes it's rather disconcerting at times! ;)


Q:

Isn't marijuana an ingredient? and therefor food?

A:

From all the places you have visited, what would be the place you would like to live after retirement?


Q:

How did chip end up chipped?

A:

Yeah well - not according to our government. So things may change once the laws around marijuana are clarified.


Q:

It's a tough question. I used to think Vietnam for a long time but lately... I'm leaning very much toward Italy! I like it there! I like the food. All those carbs are dangerous but Italy's a pretty nice place.

A:

Paige: I don't know, that's a great questions and one I've never gotten before. I'm going to make some inquiries!


Q:

Do produce grown organically in a hydroponic system in the USA maintain their organic certification/label when imported to Canada?

A:

Whenever the question comes up "If you could switch lives with anyone in the world, who would it be?" - my answer is always Anthony Bourdain. You seem to have lived such a full, adventurous and unique life. Thanks for making great shit for all these years.

My question is, if you could switch places with anyone in the world, who would it be and why?


Q:

Richard White: Have you met Gaston at Disney World by his tavern? If yes, what do you think of him?

A:

No - USDA organic hydroponic product cannot be labelled as organic in Canada.


Q:

You know the show I haven't been able to make yet, I'd like to do a show with Keith Richards. I'm working on it. He's an enthusiast and a voracious reader. He's very interested in British naval history. Maybe visiting the site of great British naval battles with Keith Richards, eat bangers and mash, cooking steak and pie together would be really fun That's something I'd really love to do.

A:

Richard: How could Gaston meet Gaston? I have seen some on YouTube and am very pleased by how faithfully they represent me.


Q:

So what incentives exist then for hydroponics to go organic? What if the rest of their system meets the standards? Aren't we limiting the growth of our sector by excluding hydroponics?

A:

Is there anything about you, your life's work, or your personality that you think didn't translate well or at all on television?


Q:

My wife claims that Beauty And The Beast is her favorite movie of all time! A question for either or both of you, is there any part of your voice work for this classic that, looking back, you wished you would have voiced a little differently?

A:

A solid logical petition would have to be submitted to the Canadian General Standards Board's Organic Technical Committee - outlining the reasons why the Standards should be broaden to include hydroponics. Each review (2009-2011 and 2013-2014) there has been a request, but the arguments presented have been deemed non-persuasive. In fact, the petitions have not really presented a sound case why the standards should be expanded.


Q:

Yeah, I don't know that I translate well on television at all. I don't know, and to be honest, I kinda don't really take myself that seriously, so I don't really care. I mean, anytime you put a lens on somebody, it has a distorting and changing effect. But I never really worry about that. I'm very lucky in that I get paid to really be myself; I don't have a script. I decide where we go and what we do on the show. I've gotten away with being obnoxious on TV for 15 years now. I don't really see any reason to chance.

So yeah, I have no complaints. I'm not afraid to look like an idiot on TV; it happens a lot. We don't have hair or makeup, for instance. It would be interesting to show up on a show with like a Trumpian Cheeto tan. Actually, I should try that.

A:

Richard: Over two and half years, we had so many opportunities to edit and reconsider that we're all very satisfied with the final version, I think.


Q:

Is hydroponic production the only agricultural production system that isn't included and regulated by the Canadian Organic Standards? (I understand aquaponics and aquaculture are.) If so, is the soil really the key issue for inclusion?

A:

How do you find the local experts in 'No Reservations" and how difficult is filming in countries that are not friendly to Americans in general?


Q:

What is your favorite line/song that was not used by your character?

A:

Aquaculture and aquaponics are covered in 32.312 and they are their own standard. Currently it is not covered by the regulation, but will be once the new Safe Foods for Canadians Act is released. And you are correct there are other non-soil based systems that are allowed.. such as sprouts, honey, processing, but when it comes to primary plant production - soil is a keystone.


Q:

We're very very good. I've been working with the same people for the whole time I've made television. And we've been traveling together and doing this thing for many years, and we found out really early on that the person you select to be your fixer in those countries, in any country, determines the success or failure of the show. So we're really really careful about finding these people who, generally speaking, are professionals who work with either news outlets, people shooting or filming major films, shooting commercials; we audition them over Skype and email; we make sure that they have an understanding of what show it is we're making and what show we're not making. It's really important they understand we're not looking for the "Top 10 Best Places" in a particular city. They have to have a sense of humor, and they have to be as knowledgeable of the places as they claim to be, which is something that has been a problem in the long ago past.

We just learned to be good judges of character in a solid fixer. Man, that will literally save your life, and has in our cases many times. We would not have made it intact out of Congo I don't think without a really great fixer. And in fact, we got everything we needed to there.

It's difficult in countries where you know that they are possibly more paranoid. Mostly people from the security services give us drivers or translators whose job it is to keep an eye on us. We're pretty good, and they may want to steer us to see positive aspects of their society, and try to get us to play into some agenda. We're pretty good at avoiding that and seeing through that. A lot of times we'll do some of what they call "French shooting" which, yes we'll let them take us on the dog-and-pony show, and we'll pretend to shoot it, but never actually end up using it on the show.

Generally speaking, people have been pretty nice to us around the world, but we do understand if you're in China or Iran, for instance, you cannot point your cameras at military installations or secret police who are walking by. It's probably not a good idea to put a camera up to those. We also have to be very careful about the position we leave our hosts in. Meaning, I can go around and come back and say anything I want about the place; but all of the people who are nice to me there, I have to think about the repercussions of my comments here. And we're very careful about that as well. I can say what I want, but I have to think about the people who were kind to me and trusted me in countries that take a dim view of free speech, let's put it that way.

A:

Paige: "Flowers, chocolates, promises you don't intend to keep". Ha, David Ogden Stiers is the funniest!


Q:

Hi, thanks for doing an AMA. My biggest concern is the labelling of non-organic foods and GMOs. But that being said, I wonder what you're also doing to stop non certified organic foods from being advertised as "organic"? There have to be standards set, and every farm on my block says it's organic, but none are certified... this means there are no consistent standards, and people I've talked to who say they run organically still use fungicides and other weird things. Just because a farm doesn't spray plants directly doesn't mean it is organic. How are you preserving the term organic? How are you stopping every joe blow from using the word?

A:

What is the most unexpected "foodie" city in the US?


Q:

How long does it take to voice an entire movie? On average, how many takes did you need for one scene?

A:

What province are you in? In provinces where provincial standards don't exist we do sometimes see the word organic applied to products that are not certified. It's a big issue. The Canadian Organic Standards are a national standard - so any product crossing provincial or international borders that is labelled organic must be certified. The provinces of QC, MB, BC, and NB have provincial organic regulations and we would like to see every province with one - that is part of the work we do with the government and in supporting provincial associations in their efforts to establish a provincial regulation.


Q:

Oh that's a really good question! You know, these days just about everywhere I go there's some young chef with a lot of tattoos of animals on their arms with their really good charcuterie program, making craft beer somewhere on the premises. So it should really not surprise me.

Nashville, TN; Asheville, NC; Minneapolis, for a very long time had really good food and a lot of great chefs. I think Los Angeles is wildly underrated; it was famous for years and appreciated for its strip mall food, it's Korean and Mexican and Latino food. But man, some of the restaurants that have been opening in the last 10 years are really really good. Everybody knows Seattle and Portland are great.

But yeah, off the top of my head, I'm kinda looking at the South. Charleston, NC, another one. But it's hard to say that these places are underrated. I mean, people are finding out how good they are. There's never been a better time to eat in America, honestly.

A:

Paige: We can record the movie entirely in one day. However, it was constantly changing and the animators would draw from us for a few months and then we'd return. Sometimes there were new lines. The whole film took four years to make and the voice actors worked on it for two and half years.


Q:

I am currently looking into schooling in the horticultural industry (possibly through Olds college in AB). After years of meddling in other industries with just no passion or interest, I feel this industry is something that really excites me.

My career research has not yet been extensive, but I'm wondering what programs you recommend for someone looking into the industry?

As well as I have a fear that many jobs are seasonal. What sort of jobs are out there that I could look further into that would be more permanent?

I appreciate your time, and am thankful for any comments or advice you might have!

A:

Has anything ever happened while filming any of your shows that scared the crap out of you?


Q:

Is the "Gaston" song the most manly thing you've ever been a part of?

It is probably my favorite Disney or musical song of all time. Never fails to make me smile.

A:

Thank you everyone for your great questions. We plan to hold another AMA in the near future so keep an eye out for that.

Signing out on this end!


Q:

Yes! Where do I begin? Every day in the DRC--the Democratic Not-So-Democratic Republic of the Congo--there were many tense moments. Libya, post-Benghazi, was again, many concerning moments where we sort of had to take regular meetings among the crew and decide for ourselves whether we would make a run for the airport or continue shooting. Beirut, 2006, got a little dodgy.

And immediately after eating Nashville Hot Chicken, that was truly, truly terrifying. And if you're considering going to Nashville, by the way, please notice that Nashvillians themselves don't eat the extra-hot fried chicken. They know better. Unless you've got three or four days to spend in a bathroom, I really advise against that.

A:

Richard: Yes, but singing "Stout-hearted Men" on the stage of City Opera came in at a close second.


Q:

What's the weirdest thing that has happened to you while traveling and filming that didn't get aired?

A:

How do you feel about the new live action film?


Q:

It was really, really weird, and didn’t air chances are it violated network standards and practices, was possibly felonious, or just so embarrassing that I'm sure as hell not going to tell you about it. Generally speaking we show everything. If I'm miserable and humiliated and everything goes wrong we show you that. I would draw your attention to the notorious Sicilian octopus fishing scene as a particularly unpleasant example of that. We really don't cut much out, if anything. Another example, Thailand. The famous Lady Boy Cabaret. It's filled with outrageously good looking transexuals or transvestites. Who kisses me on the mouth? The one girl who looks like Ernest Borgnine.

A:

Paige: Really excited. I think Emma is the perfect choice for Belle.


Q:

I see you're drinking a $150 bottle of scotch. How is it?

A:

How do you view the legacy of Beauty and the Beast?


Q:

It is very delicious. Very delicious.

A:

Paige: What an amazing gift this has been. And how wonderful generations of children will be enjoying this film many years after I am gone.


Q:

How was lunch with Obama?

A:

Richard, what are your thoughts on the Gaston that has been in so many popular videos online? Do you have a favorite? Mine is when Gaston shows up a young man who decides to challenge him to a pushup contest.


Q:

It was like really weirdly relaxed. He seemed very much at ease, like he was having fun. There were no secret service or staff in the room, just me, my camera people, some customers. Rarely have I seen someone enjoy drinking a beer from the bottle as much as the president. He's really good with chopsticks. Really because of the way he is, how relaxed and comfortable, none of us on the crew were nervous while we were shooting. It was only afterward that we all kind of looked and each other and said, "Did that just happen?" It was really fun! He was generous with his time, quick to answer, and he's funny. He spoke to me and I spoke to him, we're both fathers of girls. The president spent a lot of time in Indonesia as a young man. He's really good with chopsticks, which is always a plus in my mind.

A:

Richard: Those guys are amazing. They bring such charm to their roles while remaining true to the heart of Gaston.


Q:

Where have you eaten the best sandwich?

A:

Paige: How familiar are you with the Kingdom Hearts video games? I think you reprised Belle in Kingdom Hearts 2, right?

Also, I think you're the best Disney voice I've heard and Something There is one of my favorite songs. Thanks for the memories!


Q:

The sandwiches I crave most when I'm abroad are a pastrami on rye from Pastrami Queen, in New York. They do a sandwich at the restaurant at the Ace Hotel that is insanely delicious. It's this super crispy thin Sardinian style flat bread smeared with butter, chilis, and Bottarga, which is like salted tuna or mullet eggs. Doesn't sound so good but man it's good, especially with a cold beer. If that doesn't sound good to you, you're always safe with a great pastrami sandwich. We do it best in New York.

A:

Paige: Thank you so much for that! Kingdom Hearts was a lot of fun. Wish I could have done more.


Q:

Re: Raw Craft: What thing that you made yourself, other than food, are you most proud of, and why?

A:

Isn't it the best playing the bad guy? Gaston seems like a character that would be fun to voice.


Q:

Whoa! What have I made in my life? Wow! You've caused me to reflect on my utterly worthless existence. I mean, I give a cute answer, I assisted in the making of a 9 year old girl. A birdhouse, a chest of drawers, I really wish I could do those things. Everything I ever made with my hand, you know it was food, it literally turned to shit within 8 hours. So...wow...Oh my god! I'm really depressed now!

A:

Richard: Yes indeed! The villain is often the most interesting character in a story. They have an agenda and they go to great lengths to achieve it. Gaston is also a wonderfully comedic character. I have a ball doing him!


Q:

What countries have you not visited that you want to?

A:

The question I've been dying to ask since I was a little bookworm of a girl:

What sorts of books would Belle have in her library? (Does she prefer novels, histories, biographies? Does she have a favorite novel?)


Q:

I've been trying to get into Afghanistan for years. The insurance company is reluctant to let us shoot there. Yemen, I'd like to go very much but, obviously, that also is a security situation. There are a lot of countries that I haven't been to because of security concerns.

Though I will tell you I would like to overcome my childhood-born phobia of Switzerland at some point. You'll notice I've never done a show there. I have a deep neurotic fear of haunting vistas, you know, like a mural of Lake Geneva with snowcapped peaks and yodelers, or those dogs with the barrels under their neck. I'm frightened of all things Swiss, and I'm trying to overcome that. Working on it, and I hope to do a show there at some point.

A:

Paige: Belle would have all of them. She loved adventure novels, especially ones she could escape into and imagine herself as a part of them. Belle's favorite play is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.
MY favorite novel is To Kill a Mockingbird. Check out James Patterson's Maximum Ride books. Young female heroine who flies! Great escape novels.


Q:

What are you going to eat for dinner tonight?

A:

Hello guys,

Beauty and the Beast is our family's favorite Disney movie, great job.

My question: when you were making the movie, did you realize that you were involved in something special that would become a Disney classic much like Snow White or Cinderella?

Also, are you enjoying the association of being in the movie in your personal lives and how so?


Q:

I dunno, I'm thinking about a French dip sandwich. They do those really well in LA. Or I dunno, I had tacos at Danny Trejo's place last night, so I might go back! They were good.

A:

Paige: It changed my life. We knew from the beginning the writing was wonderful and after working on it for the first year, we realized this is going to be a classic. A truly great blessing to voice this part.


Q:

Loved your book Kitchen Confidential, but my children know you as a doctor on Yo Gabba Gabba. Can you share your experiences working on that show?

A:

Gaston's worst quality was that he was kind of an arrogant dick who wouldn't take no for an answer. From an objective point of view, at the end of the movie he was trying to kill a horrible monster that'd kidnapped a girl. Do you think he deserved to die for this?


Q:

Well, when I've been on Yo Gabba Gabba, my daughter was very young and just loved the show, was obsessed with it. And I thought it would be really cool to go on. So when they reached out to me, I jumped on it. I think they read on Twitter that I was a fan, so they invited me to the on the show as Dr. Tony. I was very excited! In fact, star struck somewhat to meet DJ Lance and the rest of the gang. I had a lot of fun on the show.

But crazy enough when my daughter saw the show and saw me doting over Tootie--who as I recall, I was helping through an illness--she became really jealous and pissed off at me, that I was being so nice and attentive to Tootie. It did not have the immediate effect that I'd hoped for. She was much more impressed later in life when I was on The Simpsons, another show I did largely for my daughter's benefit. Okay, I'll admit it, I like it.

It was a lot of fun. Very talented, very creative show, Yo Gabba Gabba, with great music on it, and great musical guests. I'd go back on in a second. You know, my daughter doesn't watch anymore, she's 9. But I like that show. I still have those songs running around in my head, you know, "Don't, don't, don't bite your friends." These are words we can live by.

A:

Richard: Who said he died??! Did you ever see a body? I feel certain that he simply bumped his head and will be resurfacing in a spinoff at a theatre near you sometime soon.


Q:

Hi Anthony,

Huge fan of your work.

How often do people see you in bars and offer to buy you a drink? What are the odds if we ever crossed paths you'd drink with a random fan?

A:

Hey Guys!

Sometimes there are qualities to a character that aren't written precisely on the page but are key to making a character feel real. What characteristics did you feel were important to bring to your performances that may not have been initially obvious?


Q:

When I first went on TV and I started going on book tours I was a guy who would literally drink anything. Fans would come up to me and offer me shots of tequila and I would actually drink them. I am still here and alive today because I don't do that anymore. If I took every offer of a shot or other substance that fans offer to me, I wouldn't have made it to 2008, much less to this year. So chances are, to be perfectly honest, you wouldn't see me at a bar. If you were to offer me a shot, I would probably politely decline. I know people offer those things with the best intentions but I'm a dad now. I'm the 60 year old dad of a 9 year old. I have to at least try to stay live long enough to get to the eye rolling stage of my daughter's life.

A:

Paige: Because they are videotaping us, they will capture our expressions. Many of those are in the film of all of the actors.
The stroke of the strand of hair was certainly me!


Q:

Did you get to keep your Bob Kramer knife from series 1 of Raw Craft? And do you still use it?

A:

That's such an old-school live animation thing--like when they had an Alice to draw from! So cool!


Q:

I did not get to keep the knife. I bid on it online; it was put up for auction. I bid $5,000, but I saw that the lowest bid at the time, or the current high bid was something like $22,000. So needless to say I did not get that knife.

I did, however, finally after a wait of longer than a year, I did get the opportunity to buy a Kramer knife. It is easily my most valued physical object that I own. It is a thing of beauty, and I'm just waiting to find food worthy of it, to use it.

A:

Richard: We had the advantage of having Howard Ashman in the room most of the time. He had such clear vision and communicated it so clearly that I always had good idea of what we were going for. Gaston's humor, we found in the doing perhaps more than on the page.


Q:

What's your take on cooking competition shows like "Top Chef"?

Edit: should probably have included this ahead of the question: Big fan of your shows. My only complaint is that by the time I got to the good restaurants from "no reservations" they were already too popular! You saved my ass in Montreal, where I had little time, no cell service, and clothing not appropriate for that level of cold. I can't for the life of me remember the name of the restaurant, but I went to one of them about 3 times in as many days, and it didn't disappoint!

A:

What do I need to do to be strong like Gaston? Do you think I could get there by doing 100 push-ups, 100 sit-ups, 100 squats, and a 10km run every single day?


Q:

There are good ones, there are bad ones. I think Top Chef is probably the best of them. I like them. Ariane loves Chopped, wants to be on Chopped. She also loves Master Chef Junior. So when I'm watching with a 9-year-old they're a lot of fun.

Look, I never thought of cooking as a competitive sport. It's entertainment, but I guess if you're looking for the best technical/professional cooking, Top Chef would probably be the high water mark. I have mixed emotions about it. I think a lot of these shows, on one hand, have been good for the industry. On the other hand, they've created an entire species of cook, who really doesn't want to work in a restaurant; they just want to be on TV. And that's always worrying.

A:

Richard: That would be a fine start, however, there is a limit to what a mere mortal might accomplish.


Q:

Hey Tony, you're on your last $20 EVER. Where do you go to eat and drink in NYC?

A:

How do you guys feel about the theory going around that Belle was suffering from Stockholm Syndrome and wasn't actually in love with her kidnapper?


Q:

Twenty dollars?! I don't know. It might be a dirty water hot dog. You know? A bagel, with some butter, or no! A bialy. A toasted bialy with some butter, maybe at like Barney Greengrass, and then...what, do I die after spending this $20? Is that what happens? I mean, it's a pretty good value, maybe I'll have two bialys for $20.

A:

Richard: That was just a theory? How else could you explain not falling for Gaston?!


Q:
  • Have you been back to the Waffle House?
  • How do you take your hash browns?
A:

How many eggs would you each say you actually eat in a day?


Q:

That was my one and only time at waffle house. It is a strange and exotic wonderland to me. I really have yet to explore it fully. I was obviously thoroughly taken by it and cannot wait to go back. In fact, I have a secret urge, as a lot of my chef friends do, their secret urge is that they want cook at Waffle House. Just for a day to see if they can hack it because it's a tough gig. No, so I haven't been back, they don't have it in the New York/Tristate area unfortunately. If they did I would be hitting that place hard and often. They're wonderful.

A:

Richard: 2 egg whites on dry toast.


Q:

What's your favorite Kentucky Bourbon?

A:

How were you both cast for the movie? Were they like, "Hey we're doing a movie based in France about a mansion filled with talking furniture and there's a rose and a beauty and a beast."


Q:

My favorite Kentucky bourbon? Very very old Fitzgerald, that's some nice stuff. If you were to present me with a bottle of very very very very very old Fitzgerald, I don't know if it exists, but man that's good.

I have to say, my friend Sean Rock is constantly coming up with these freakishly rare bottles of bourbon that I never thought of as particularly good, that are amazing. So it's not a subject I know much about, but I look forward to finding out.

A:

Paige: It was written as a broadway musical film. They searched for broadway actors/singers and wound up using all major characters that were broadway veterans. I had five auditions. Talking furniture was pretty clever, agreed!


Q:

Do you ever feel ridiculous if you have to make reservations?

A:

Thanks for doing the AMA! If you could choose another Disney movie to have done some voice work on, which movie would both of you choose?


Q:

No, I do it without shame. I'm like super organized, I'm a list maker, and I have a schedule. I'm not one of those people who calls a restaurant at the last minute and says, "Do you know who I am?" I plan ahead. I do make reservations. And I always show up for them.

You know, making multiple reservations in multiple restaurants on the same night at the same time and blowing off the other ones? That's right up there with being rude to your server, as far as restaurant crimes. They should keep a file on such people. In fact, some restaurants do!

A:

Paige: It was before my time, but I would love to have voiced Bambi's mother.


Q:

Awesome!

  1. Which ethnic food do Americans need to embrace more?

  2. Which foods do Americans need to stop eating?

You are an inspiration... Im 51 years old and out of work. When I watch your shows, I know older guys can still be cool! THANK YOU!

A:

What's the secret to imbuing a voice with character and humanity?


Q:

There are a lot that I think are underappreciated. Chinese food still remains a mystery to us, it's not really anything like what they eat in China. Our knowledge on Japanese is not so wonderful. Countries who's food is underrepresented, Brazil, Peru, higher end Mexican food, Burmese, West African. Food from Senegal and Ghana is amazing, delicious, complex and interesting. So many of the fundamental flavors of what we call american food, in fact, came from those places. "Traditional Southern Food" so many of those textures and flavors and ingredients can trace their roots directly to West Africa.

Well look, do you really need pizza that's stuffed with cheese? County faire novelty food? deep fried butter. We can eat a lot less deep fried stuff, for sure. I'm not a big fan of the major fast food chains. Anything that's oversized. Giant jugs of soda. I'm a father and I think about these things, sugar intake. I'm gonna be fair to junk food, I have trashy taste, but some of the fast food concoctions are pretty heinous. I personally don't like fake Italian or fake Mexican food. One of the joys of having lots of Mexicans and Mexican Americans around is they make delicious food! Why would we go a to a fast food outlet, for more money, selling us bad food. I wouldn't mind seeing the end of these monster nacho concoctions. Anyone who would insist on putting BBQ in a Nori roll, kind of offends me. Theme restaurants...not so great. There is a restaurant in Vegas, I think it's called The Heart Attack Grill, where if you are over 350lbs you eat for free. I think that should be pretty much a war crime.

A:

Paige: You must be totally sincere and real at all times. The microphone picks up everything. I treated it as if I were shooting an on-camera film.


Q:

Hi Mr. Bourdain. What's the coolest shit you found?

A:

Oh my glob, so many questions.

Is every last inch of you covered with hair?

Are you especially good at expectorating?


Q:

Coolest shit I ever found anywhere? I dunno, I mean the most cool shit per square foot is probably in Tokyo. You know, if you're looking for cool shit, your statistical likelihood of finding some is gonna be in Tokyo.

Wow, what a tough question. Yeah, try Tokyo.

A:

Richard: of course... I was the hair model (not really) But I am ESPECIALLY good at expectorating!


Q:

Tony, you really inspired me to travel the world. I spent 6 months backpacking in Southeast Asia last year and always made a point to seek out restaurants you'd visited. Thanks for what you do.

That said, how do you feel about the impact of a small local restaurant appearing on your shows? Do you ever make a point to not reveal the location of a restaurant?

I remember visiting the Soup Lady in Saigon, and it had become a pretty big tourist hot spot. This wasn't the case everywhere you'd been, but the impact was definitely visible at times.

A:

If a movie was made about your life, who would you want to play you?


Q:

Yeah, that's a hard question that we wrestle with all the time on the show. I understand there are places that I love because they're sort of untouched, beloved by locals, undiscovered. That's exactly the type of place I love to celebrate. On the other hand I understand that very often the fact that we put those places on TV changes the nature of the business. Next time we go back there are tourists there, they added an extra dining room, the place is less charming. I imagine the locals, who have been going there for years, are kind of pissed at us.

There have been occasions where someone has taken us to a special place of theirs, that is just so awesome, and they express have reservations about putting it on TV. They don't want to see the place ruined. We have referred to places as "restaurant X" or said "we're just not telling you the name of this bar." A few people do the extra work to find the place, at least they have to work extra to find it. There are places that are just so awesome that I will just look into the camera and say "look I'm just not telling you where this place is or what it's name is. I just don't want to ruin it." More often than not, there is an element of destroying the things I love.

A:

Richard: Gaston....


Q:

What is your favorite way to alter a cheap, supermarket-bought, processed item to make it palatable (e.g. boxed Mac and Cheese, Ramen, etc.)? You know, for bachelors. And broke people.

A:

First of all, I was 4 when I first saw the film. And I related to Belle so much because she didn't quite fit in. So, thank you for bring to life such a beautiful character that made me come out of my shell and to treat others with kindness. Now for me question: How did you relate to your characters and make them so personable?


Q:

There is no single cure all. I would say the ultimate broke ass, dorm food, for people who don't have a lot of money, for people aren't good at cooking, if you only have a hotplate, is a Korean dish called Budae Jjigae, also known as Army Stew or Korean Army Stew. You can google that shit. It is an unholy mix of ramen, hot dogs (or vienna sausage), spam, beans, kimchi, and Korean spices. I know that sounds like just a horrible train wreck, it's really delicious and you can pretty much train a reasonably intelligent doberman to make it. It's perfect. When there was a lot of poverty and necessity during wartime in Korea, it perfectly reflects the need to improvise, innovate, and make the most of what you have on hand. It remains a delicious and beloved dish in Korea. I adore this stuff.

A:

Paige: It was the only role in my career, that was so close to my own personality...that directors and Howard kept encouraging me to let my wall down and let Paige come through. A challenge at first, and then a blessing in disguise. Thanks for the compliment!


Q:

Mr. Bourdain, as a young aspiring chef I have heard that many restaurants don't really care about culinary school experience, if this is the case, what do you look for (other than experience) in a chef when you are hiring?

Also, all I ever hear people talk about when I mention that I want to be a chef is how awful the industry is, what are some of the upsides to working in food?

A:

When you were doing the recordings, are you actually in the same sound stage, or do you have to pretend that the other person is there?


Q:

Look, you're either the sort of person who likes the restaurant industry, or you're a normal person. Experience is less important as a long-time employer, as the chef. What I look for is someone who's showed up on time every day reliably, who can be counted on absolutely to show up on time and have the respect to honor their basic commitment to their co-workers and their employers. I figure if you're the sort of person who shows up reliably on time and doesn't complain, then you're worth me taking my time to give you the experience. Willingness to learn. I think that's why so many people prefer to promote dishwashers off the line than hire somebody who presumably has experience.

So yeah, I'd say the best thing you can do is to show yourself to be the sort of person worth investing the chef's time and attention in; it's a mentoring business. People pass their experience down to the next generation and the next. Prove yourself early and often; be the sort of person deserving of that investment.

As far as, you know...what can I tell you? It's a very very very hard, unglamorous business, regardless of what you might think from watching television. You're probably not going to be on TV, you're going to go home every night smelling of smoked salmon and garlic. It's murder on your social life. You know, it's probably not the easiest; it's physically demanding. Mentally demanding. But some people, like me, love it.

A:

Richard: as a rule, voice work is done alone in a booth, but in our case, Paige was able to talk them into allowing us to react to one another while we were recording. We feel that helped a great deal in establishing relationships between the characters.


Q:

How was your Archer experience?

Edit: my first gold is also my first AMA question answered. What a time to be alive! Thank you :D

A:

Richard, any memories from the star-studded Evening with Alan Jay Lerner?


Q:

Oh the best! I was sucking up to the Archer people for like a year! I was on a podcast, I said I'd work for free, I said I'd bring them coffee on the set, back massages. I'm such an uber fan of that show. I went to Comic Con and I'd stalk them. I have seen them since at the Emmys, they won an Emmy this year. I went up to them, my character was last seen falling out of a helicopter but you don't see him hitting the ground! So maybe he lived because all I want right now is to be back on Archer. It was pretty much the high watermark of my career. After that, everything is meaningless.

A:

Richard: OMG, YES! Thank you for remembering it. Robert Goulet, Hal Linden, John Cullum, and I shared a dressing room. Being a fly on that wall was unforgettable. I also met Julie Andrews. I was so happy to be asked to honor Alan in that way.


Q:

How's your BJJ training going? How's the wear and tear on you from the training?

A:

Any film voice performance that you regard highly, as experienced voice performers yourself? Who is the Brando of voice acting?


Q:

I've been really lucky. I had one early injury as a white belt, but lately it's going really, really well. Feeling pretty good about leg attacks. They run in the family. I'm training out in LA at Cobrinha and at 5 Star, and really enjoying it. I'm very happy and I'm staying healthy so far.

A:

Paige: Jodi Benson is brilliant at it. Also, Jessie Corti (LeFou) is extremely versatile.


Q:

Hey Anthony, I love your shows I was just curious how you felt about the drug addiction situation that is going on, especially in the north east, at this time? Also your favorite dish to cook!

A:

Hello, welcome to Reddit!

My question, for both of you, is what Disney films have you enjoyed besides BatB?


Q:

I think the pharmaceutical companies have to share some responsibility here, but I think it's sort of the final evidence of the utter failure of the war on drugs. I think it's about time we start treating addiction as a pressing and urgent health problem rather than a law enforcement problem. I've spoken with many many law enforcement officials about this over the years, and not one of them can look you in the eye and say that their entire life's effort--fighting drugs by interdiction, impounding, or taking out cartels--none of it has had any effect on the price or availability of narcotics. I think it's time we see the disruptive effects of the war on drugs.

I remember when it was declared during the Nixon years, and we need to find a Plan B, and start treating drug addiction as the health problem it is. To do otherwise would be an absolute denial of the facts.

To answer your second question, I love cooking pasta. It makes me happy. I don't claim to be particularly good at it--Italian food is not really my area of expertise--but there's something about it that is magical for me.

A:

Paige: Fave of all time: Mary Poppins. Other favorites: Bambi, Snow White and Mulan


Q:

You monologue musings are fantastic. Do other writers assist or is it all from the brain of Bourdain?

What do you do to get in the mood for writing?

Any inspirations like Three Stooges and a martini? Nature? Poetry? Meditation? Mushrooms?

Besides just practicing, how can someone become a better writer?

A:

Did you ever see Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast? Were you delighted that Disney was able to capture so much of the tone/feel of the film in the animation? (I was.)


Q:

In my case, I write everything. I write every word. I have found that the only way I can write is early in the morning, first thing, stone-cold sober. So I will wake up, start writing, and write for as long as I can. I get stupider as the day goes on. I just get stupider and stupider as it gets later in the day. So, yeah, stone-cold sober, first thing in the morning. No other way for me.

Nothing's gonna help me do anything but get distracted. If smoking weed is first on your list of things to do, you're probably not getting to #2. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

A:

Paige: Yes, I loved it. The hardest challenge for the writers was creating a story around Belle and Beast as the Cocteau version was basically them going to dinner. Geniuses!


Q:

How is your food court/night market concept going? I'm super excited for it to open!

A:

Did you ever see Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast? Were you delighted that Disney was able to capture so much of the tone/feel of the film in the animation? (I was.)


Q:

We're hoping to be open by 2019, so we're two years out. We're getting there!

A:

Paige: It was extremely emotional and exhilarating at the same time.


Q:

Where can I find the best tacos in the world, specifically?

A:

Did you guys ever visit the Be Our Guest restaurant in Disneyworld? What did you think?


Q:

I don't know, I mean look, they take their tacos very seriously in Mexico City. I'll answer the question like this, I'll dodge the question and tell you that the best tostada in the world is in Ensenada in Baja in Mexico at a place called La Guerrerense.

The stuff they serve there is as fresh, as vibrant, as sophisticated, as flavorful, as anything I've ever had at a beach style restaurant. As much as I'd like to answer your taco question let’s go with tostadas. Ensenada La Guerrerense.

A:

Richard: Not yet....


Q:

When will you be on Joe Rogan's podcast again? It's been too long and I'm starting to itch.

A:

Robby Benson was a mentor to my best friend in college, he sends his well wishes to Robby.

What do you guys think about Hamilton? It's the hot thing right now. Lin-Manuel Miranda is hot right now. Thoughts?


Q:

Soon I hope! It's always a lot of fun to hang out with Joe. I like him very much, I like his podcast. But I will tell you that if Joe Rogan ever wants to demonstrate a choke on you, don't let that happen. He's like, really really really strong, and yeah. Just, it hurts. A lot.

A:

Paige: My husband and I saw it last night. I've never seen Michael tear up as much as he did last night for Hamilton. It's magnificent piece of theater!


Q:

Is a hot dog a sandwich?

A:

Do you guys ever just randomly quote your old lines? If so, how often!?


Q:

I've noticed this question coming up again and again.

No. I don't think it's a sandwich. I don't think a hamburger is a sandwich either. The fact that it's in between bread--the bread is a delivery system, a ballistic delivery system. It is not a classic sandwich, in my view.

I mean, if you were to talk into any vendor of fine hot dogs, and ask for a hot dog sandwich, they would probably report you to the FBI. As they should.

A:

Paige: Not often, however, the "Positively primeval" line comes up now and then.


Q:

Any chance of Rogan being on an episode that has some sort of BJJ segment or theme?

A:

Have either of you ever had an interaction with your costumed counterparts at a Disney Park, without them knowing who you were, and how did that go?

When you recorded your roles, were you secluded from other members of the cast or did you ever get to record with them in the room as well?


Q:

No. I'm not rolling with that guy, it hurts. He does not roll light, he goes really really hard. He's a neck cranker, by the way, and he's got bowling balls for arms, no visible neck, and he only rolls with no gi. So as much as I love the guy, I'll do anything with him; shoot animals in the brain, canoe trip, hot tubbing, whatever. But I'm not rolling with the guy.

A:

Paige: Actually that has never happened, I think they know as soon as I walk in that it's me in the park. There was one girl who was a Belle character in the park who wanted to meet me and when we went to her boss's office for us to meet, she wouldn't come out of her Belle character! Finally she looked at her boss, and he told her it was ok to step out of character it was very sweet.

For recording, fortunately Robby, Richard and I all recorded together. Not the norm.


Q:

Love No Reservations...yum...Balvenie...sooo good. is scotch your "go-to" drink?

A:

Paige. You voiced my favorite Disney princess! Thank you for the memories. I currently have "Something There" now in my head.

Silly question but have you been to Disney World / Land lately? What's your favorite ride?


Q:

It's my special event. You know there's always a special time for me where I move over to Scotch. Generally, when I'm in a philosophical, reflective, or otherwise bittersweet kind of a mood, when I'm drinking alone, listening to music by myself; you know, maybe before a holiday meal or something like that and I have company over. But it's not like every day. I'm a beer drinker, ordinarily. So if I'm drinking expensive whiskey, it's gonna be a special event.

A:

Paige: My favorite ride my whole life has been Peter Pan. I was so thrilled when my friend Rob Marshall, the big star director now, said it was his favorite too! Stomach can't handle the rollercoasters. Also love Soaring.


Q:

If you could have dinner with any three people, alive or dead, who would they be?

A:

Louise Brooks, Orson Welles, and James Angleton the former head of capital intelligence for the CIA. There's a couple of questions I'd like to ask him. They're all dead unfortunately.


Q:

Big fan. What is your favorite place to eat in Chicago?

A:

I love Girl & the Goat, I love Avec, I really like that restaurant. Who is it, Johnnie's Beef? Good stuff. Any Chicago hot dog is the finest in the land, love that product.

I dunno, Girl & the Goat I really love.