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Q:

Hi Brandon - I love you.

You're great at painting dudes with weird faces. Who has the best weird face?

Also, do you ever get mistaken for Brad Bird? How about Big Bird?

Those are my questions.

A:

How does it work, is the film's digital image stretcheed to surround a 360° space? If so, does that affect image quality? :~)


Q:

Hi Michael, thank you for doing this !

I am a huge fan of The Shield, must of watched the whole series 4 times so far, def my favourite Cop Show, if not Tv show period.

I just wanted your take on what happens to Vic after the show ends ? Does he turn around in the elevator and think Nah man, 3 years desk job is better than Prison, or does he think Fuck it and go full Punisher ? Edit : or any other scenario of course !

Thanks again !

A:

Was going to say Jerry Orbach but changing my reply to Colm Meaney.

When I was a teen looking at art schools the Cal Arts people kept asking if I was related to Brad Bird. I am not tall enough to be Big Bird or even Average Size Bird.


Q:

The film was shot as a standard film production. For the VR experience we did two things. We shot an original 360º video production with some of the same crew and cast. This became an original prequel for VR headsets. Then we used the original movie and placed it into a an infected zombie lair.

We also give you a ton of weapons that you can use in the lair. So if a zombie attacks you, you can blow them away,

  • Dan
A:

I wouldn't say because the possibility still remains to do more with Vic.


Q:

Hi Brandon. How do you feel about fans getting tattoos of your art? Has this happened yet, or would I potentially become the first?

A:

That sounds very cool!


Q:

Michael, now that you are starting to turn into a metahuman on Gotham, when can we expect you to yell ITS CLOBBERIN TIME!?

A:

People have done it, which is cool, but I'm weirded out when they ask for my permission. Like, I don't wanna be responsible for someone else's skin, ya know?


Q:

As for crewing up if you don't have film relationships I suggest going to local film groups and finding like minded film lovers looking to make movies. :)

A:

Not going to happen... but I will have another iconic catch phrase to say and it's so much fun to have helped invent and introduce a new character into the DC pantheon that you will all soon meet! BOOM!


Q:

you've explained this before, and for the life of me i can't find it, but can you tell us more about how you use your art to critique pop culture or society? obviously your work is funny and wonderful, but can you tell us more about the layers and depth to it?

maybe i'm missing the point by needing to have it explained, but it would be a big help nonetheless, thanks.

A:

"stumbled across an investor"

Could you explain in more detail? We'd love to hear about it.


Q:

Did you do anything after that?

A:

Apologies if this turns into a lengthy reply, but first and foremost I don't feel that art needs to have any sort of critique or broader social statement (I think the notion that it does mutated out of the academic scene, where art as a discipline was being taught alongside analytical writing in fields where social critique was the point). I think it's enough for art to have an emotional response; in fact I think that is the exact function and purpose of art. So, for me it's enough to make something that's funny. That said, I try not to make dumb jokes... if the humor can be layered on top of something, like making fun of certain artistic forms and conventions (like coloring books), or making fun of a certain type of masculine figure (Michael Bay, Guy Fieri), then it becomes a deeper and better joke. Humor that is "about" something is usually better than humor that is just trying to be "random."


Q:

haha I guess you're right that was a bit vague... but thats the problem with filmmaking. There is no "right way" or specific path to follow. Every film has been different. What I meant by that was we chased every lead we had to people that had equity to invest and right about the time we thought we had run out of options we meet our executive producer by sheer luck. We were showing the promo trailer to a friend and another buddy of his happened to be there at the time... He saw it and loved it and asked how he could be involved.

A:

On Seinfeld? Nope, just that guest star turn. Little story about that... It was shot on the day the first Gulf War started! We were all watching SKUD missiles landing in Tel Aviv backstage and if I remember correctly, Jerry's parents were there! So we were all very tense and then suddenly they called "places!" and we were off to shoot the show. I think the stress made for a funnier show actually.


Q:

What sound, if any, do you imagine a platypus might make?

A:

How does someone who is interested in VR get into the industry?


Q:

He sure was!

A:

"A-do-do-doooot-doooooooooooo."


Q:

Are you referring 360 videos or interactive?

For 360 video I'd invest in the Samsung 360 camera and start shooting. Production in this format is VERY different that normal 2d film.

For interactive I'd suggest you download unicy or unreal to start learning how to code -Dan Groove Jones

A:

So I want you all to know that I will be appearing on Harry (Harry Connick Jr.'s new show) on Monday 10/24 on Fox! I sing one of the songs from my new album INFLUENCE with his incredible band! Check it out!!!


Q:

What is the title of the 1981 Gus Levy film in which Orbach played an NYPD detective prior to his iconic role in L&O?

Bonus points: what was that detctive's name?

No googling!

A:

I was wondering that also!


Q:

Now that it’s been a few years since your portrayal of The Thing, how would you critique your performance as this fan-favorite character?

A:

Prince of the City. I know this because when he got the L&O part they told him, "Just do 'Prince of the City.'"


Q:

The short answer is no... Several studies out there but nothing on concrete on the long term effects. But it looks awesome :)

A:

I'm very proud of the F4 films that we made. It's true they skew a little younger but they are well made and in keeping with the spirit of the F4. I'm particularly happy that I was able to impart the emotions necessary through all that latex rubber! Not easy at all!


Q:

How'd you come up with the idea to do a Law and Order coloring book?

A:

Do you have any advice on set control? :~) I'm not sure if Datlight's End was done this way? Just wondering is all. :~P


Q:

Who was your role model growing up?

A:

I was watching A LOT of Law & Order (this was the days when TNT would have 3 - 5 hours a night) and being that deep into the rhythm / structure of the show made me think, "Oh this would be really funny if I turned it into a coloring book." Also, the juxtaposition of "dead bodies & banal courtroom procedure" + "something made for kids."


Q:

Are you referring to normal films or 360?

A:

My mother and father. They are great people and I have tremendous respect for them.


Q:

What are your thoughts on “Sonny” Carisi? I've found that he's a very polarizing figure for SVU fans, and I would love your thoughts.

A:

Not really, there are a handful but they are modded by outside parties. :~)


Q:

What is the best/funniest practical joke you have seen happen on the set?

A:

I think he's... fine? No one can ever be as bad as Detective Chester Lake.


Q:

Can you clarify what you mean by set control?

A:

On The Shield we were pranksters. The prop guys especially... Anyway, one day I went into my trailer and all my personal clothes were missing. Had to go home in costume. They still haven't given them back.


Q:

You are fucking awesome sir. I remember seeing your Law and Order coloring books a little while back and was floored by how awesome it was! Very inspiring! Can you tell me more about your Sears paintings? What inspired you to paint them? What have you seen traveling the country and going to Sears? Do you think they're as doomed as folks say?

A:

Haha yeah, sorry for the broad question. One of my bad points lol. How to keep enough order on set without looking like a tyrant?


Q:

As a bald man, what is your hat philosophy? I am also a beautiful bald man. I want to protect my dome from the sun, but don't want to look like a douche. What should I do?

A:

Here are all the Searses I've painted so far: http://brandonbird.com/searses.html

The Sears thing sort of started as a joke when I was first learning how to use oils. I thought, "What would be the most unexciting thing to do an impressionist landscape of?" And then I thought it would be funny to do a whole series of them ("America's Greatest Sears Stores") with the joke being that they were all kinda the same, just beige boxes. As a lark I used to Kickstarter to fund a Sears trip, and I found that they were actually not all beige boxes, and there is quite a lot of variety to the Sears stores of this great land. I'm not totally sure what the fate of Sears will be, but I was recently contacted by a Sears investor interested in sponsoring a Sears art show... so some people are still out there fighting for it.


Q:

Haha... No worries. I think the secret is hiring a great assistant director and let him be the tyrant. Haha

A:

Hats are great but you have to find the ones that work on your head. That can be tricky so it's good if your significant other has a good eye that you trust!


Q:

Brandon, I love your pop culture art because it builds these upbeat and positive worlds. One of my favorite ideas was creating a Phillip Seymour Hoffman halloween costume for children without it being an insult. Do any of you ideas ever start out with the audience laughing at the person more than with the person? If so, could you name an example?

A:

Love you Mike. Huge Fan. Do you ever keep in touch with Detective Scrotes?


Q:

Yes, but I'm trying to think of an example of an idea I scrapped for being too cruel... I suppose the Val Kilmer collector plate is right on the edge and that bothers me a bit.

A:

Ha ha... smh


Q:

I met you back during your time at Cornell, and I think you're still awesome. How do you decide if a particular work of yours is worth showing off, or is everything you do just that good?

A:

Hi Michael, how did you feel about your role in American Horror Story?


Q:

I will throw plenty of things away and start over (I think more than a few Risleyites got proto-Searses that would have gone in the trash). If I mess up it's usually in the early stages--the wrong color base coat or something like that--where I'd spend more time fighting the paint and correcting than just starting over.

A:

Very dark and difficult to live in from day to day.


Q:

Hey Michael. Obviously, you work closely on DC Television. What do you think about the other DC shows like Arrow, Flash and Legends of Tomorrow? What would your thoughts be on a potential crossover with The Flash for example? He can travel to alternate earths and through time, so it could be possible :-)

A:

I love crossovers in comic book universes in general. It's a shame that rights issues so often preclude them from happening.


Q:

The Commish! Would be the best cop show ever. Oh man they'd always be butting heads.

A:

Thanks for all your questions! Go check out my new solo album INFLUENCE on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon or any streaming and digital download sites!


Q:

How do you feel about the pipeline situation, and the apparent media cover-up?

A:

Not really in the know about this.


Q:

What do you look for in a script?

A:

A compelling story, beautifully told with strong three dimensional characters.


Q:

What do you think of Vancouver?

A:

Love that city! Many wonderful memories for me there!


Q:

What is your favourite Number and why?

A:

3... don't know why.


Q:

What is your favorite pizza?

A:

Pepperoni. No question.


Q:

Ben and Jerry's or HagenDaas?

A:

All of the above!


Q:

Alright. Now for my real question. The Shield is one of my all-time favorite shows. Bar none it is some of the best television ever made, in my opinion.

When you spend years developing a character as complex as as dark as Mackie...well...do you find yourself becoming darker, or is it easy to put that away and say "that's not me," at the end of the day?

A:

It can be very challenging but as part of my training as an actor I was taught to make those lines very clear and distinguishable. ACTING IS MAKE BELIEVE.


Q:

It can be very challenging but as part of my training as an actor I was taught to make those lines very clear and distinguishable. ACTING IS MAKE BELIEVE.

Well, let me be one of the many thousands out there to say that you play make believe very well. You are one of Those Actors that literally if you are in it, I will watch it.

A:

Many thanks. That's everything to me!


Q:

My girlfriend loves Gotham more then I do, and she is pumped because she has it in her head that Jerome will be returning, is there any truth to that?

A:

I can't confirm or deny that.


Q:

[deleted]

A:

TB is my friend and it's true, we New Englanders love him but it's because he's a class act and he's led us to 6 SB's and 4 championships, not cause he's handsome... although that doesn't hurt. Ha!


Q:

[deleted]

A:

I'm going to keep it positive here today.