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Specialized Profession10 years ago on this day I inadvertently shut down the city of Boston with a marketing stunt on behalf of Cartoon Network. AMA!

Jan 31st 2017 by SamEwen • 8 Questions • 129 Points

I am a filmmaker and the son of renowned drug-policy activist Amanda Feilding. My latest feature documentary, The Sunshine Makers, is out now on select US cinemas and VOD. It's about Nick Sand and Tim Scully, two underground chemists united in a mission to save the planet with the consciousness-raising power of LSD. Together they manufactured industrial quantities of Orange Sunshine, the most famous LSD ever made - with the Fed hot on their tails... I am here with Tim Scully, the science genius behind the Orange Sunshine who changed his mind about the ultimate use for LSD. Ask us anything!

Prroof:

https://i.redd.it/gxju6eurubby.jpg https://i.redd.it/vuhktwvuubby.jpg

Q:

First off, thank you for that! I enjoyed every second of the hilarity.

Have you worked with CN/Adult Swim since? If so what projects?

A:

Yes, with hindsight 300ug was more than necessary. The high dose led to many emergency room admissions because people got frightened.


Q:

Hi, how was it to be a prisoner during that time? How did you deal with everything mentally when the war was over?

A:

What is your favorite memory from your time with Guns N' Roses?


Q:

Why do you think the food service industry is more willing to give people a second chance? I feel like many other industries are not as open to hiring people who are trying to get back in the workforce.

A:

did you make eye contact with him?


Q:

Why did they cancel Red Road?

A:

Yes, with hindsight 300ug was more than necessary. The high dose led to many emergency room admissions because people got frightened.


Q:

HA, oh no. They wanted NOTHING to do with us after that. But we did a lot of work for other companies after that, while not as attention getting, still made me proud.

A:

The science suggests that LSD could have amazing potential for treating serious psychiatric conditions such as depression and anxiety, but there is still a lot of research to be done.

We don't want people running out and thinking they can cure their mental illness on their own with acid from the street. This has to be taken extremely seriously. The scientists leading this research into LSD have gone to great lengths to insure safety. The studies are done in hospitals and there is always a medical professional there along with many other safety measures.

THere is a lot of room for LSD to be abused, and if too much of that happens it will hinder the scientific research again just as it did in the 60s.

I hope in the next 5-10 years there will be enough science for LSD to be approved as a medicine under very strict regulations


Q:

"I went through everything. Hunger, thirst, cold, heat. Th worst thing was home sickness, with 17 1/2. Only after two years were we allowed to write our parents. They didn't know where I was for two years. I had to work for what the Germans did to the Russian people. We worked four years for that without receiving the pay that they told us we'd get after we would be released. The Russians told us at least that it would be kept for what the Germans did to the Russian people."

"I didn't talk about it at all afterwards. Only some rare times." (Nowadays he talks about it some more though).

A:

Steven: The whole five years that we were together. Every moment. It was magic. It was really magic. We couldn't do wrong and it was excitement 25 hours, 8 days a week. So, just being a part of those guys was great. It was like I was part of the cool kids in school.

Deanna: That was his family. When he was in a band, that was his family. And that was okay.

Steven: Assholes.

[laughter]


Q:

This industry is more forgiving, they are looking for people who work hard, they want people who show up and they are hiring. Its the perfect opportunity for people to have a second chance

A:

He made eye contact with me, and with the spine.


Q:

Hmmm. Sadly it was too good for this world...

A:

The science suggests that LSD could have amazing potential for treating serious psychiatric conditions such as depression and anxiety, but there is still a lot of research to be done.

We don't want people running out and thinking they can cure their mental illness on their own with acid from the street. This has to be taken extremely seriously. The scientists leading this research into LSD have gone to great lengths to insure safety. The studies are done in hospitals and there is always a medical professional there along with many other safety measures.

THere is a lot of room for LSD to be abused, and if too much of that happens it will hinder the scientific research again just as it did in the 60s.

I hope in the next 5-10 years there will be enough science for LSD to be approved as a medicine under very strict regulations


Q:

Zebbler seemed to be the face of this scandal but my memory is fuzzy, how much were you involved in legally after the fact?

A:

What would be your preferred process for reintroducing LSD into society? Do you feel the main priority is to reduce restrictions on, and enable state funding for, research so that we can treat people with certain illnesses?

Are you in favour of making it accessible to the whole of society? If not, why not? If so, do you feel there needs to be an informational campaign to debunk decades of misinformation about LSD and educate people about its most suitable application – as a ‘tool for introverted spiritual growth’?


Q:

Was the news of Hitler's alleged suicide a feeling of relief or despair?

You say that you believed in the war effort, but at the same time you had to see the momentum shifting in the waning months of the war toward the Allied powers. I'm curious if German soldiers were starting to lose their morale and wanted the war to just be over, knowing that Hitler's death or a Wunderwaffe was the only way to achieve this.

A:

What's a crazy story about raising Steven and the Guns N Roses?


Q:

Can you serve alcohol at your restaurant? If so, are there any challenges w/ your employees?

A:

Did it send chills down his sp.......wait, he doesn't have one.


Q:

What do you like most about what you do?

A:

What would be your preferred process for reintroducing LSD into society? Do you feel the main priority is to reduce restrictions on, and enable state funding for, research so that we can treat people with certain illnesses?

Are you in favour of making it accessible to the whole of society? If not, why not? If so, do you feel there needs to be an informational campaign to debunk decades of misinformation about LSD and educate people about its most suitable application – as a ‘tool for introverted spiritual growth’?


Q:

I paid for he and his partner's entire legal case and guided them along the way. CN was going to pay for it all until the hair style press conference and then they walked away.

A:

Good questions...

I think first and foremost the focus should be on getting psychedelics approved as medicines for very particular medical conditions which will be heavily regulated by the government.

In the long run I think people should be allowed to experiment with these substances in very controlled and safe environments - just as psychedelics have been used in most ancient cultures for millennia.

But as you say, I think a lot of education is needed to prepare society for this kind of wider societal use.

Psychedelics are certainly not for everyone, but they can clearly be of great benefit to some people and some of those people have been a great benefit to society as a whole: e.g. Steve Jobs, Jimmi Hendrix, the Beatles, and Nobel Prize winning scientist Francis Crick


Q:

About Hitlers suicide he says: "Then we knew that the war was over and that we had lost it. It was more of a feeling relief." He mentions the assassination attempt of Stauffenberg and says: "It was really a shame that it didn't work. If that assassination had worked, then a lot of things would have been better." It was his opinion back then already as well.

Him and the other soldiers believed in the war until the last days. THey believed in the Wunderwaffe, there was not a loss of morale in a way.

A:

Deanna: One of the most exciting times for us is the first time we saw him play.. We went in and we saw Steven and he says "stand over here so you won't get hurt." So he leaves us and all of a sudden the light goes down, pitch black, and then all of a sudden we hear Steven bang on the drums, the guitar, and it was so loud, I actually thought a 747 landed on my head. That's how loud it was, I immediately got deaf, I lost my hearing. My head was going boom boom boom! There was so much weed in that place!

Steven: And that was just from me! That was just me smoking!

Deanna: I was high, I had a headache, I mean my brain was going crazy, I couldn't hear nothing. So I lasted about 3 songs and then we left. On the way home, don't even ask me what was going on in the car, I couldn't hear anything, Jamie fell asleep, he was probably stoned already and he passed out. On the way home I got scared. I said What's going on? What's this all about? What's happening? I never in my wildest dreams thought that they were gonna make it big, that they were going to be the number 1 band in the country at that time.


Q:

Yes, we can definitely serve alcohol. If someone is doing a 12-step program or something similar they don't necessarily have to work behind the bar. They are required to know the spirits but they don't have to be around the spirits.

A:

He looked confused, and then mildly alarmed.


Q:

I love that I work for myself, or rather I get to work for the common unconscious. This is what makes me happy! I get to work in the land of the dreams we do not even know we are having- that is where I like to spend my time and I have a life that lets me do it. Who knows how long it will last but it is pretty cool now. I love docs because you get to enter worlds. If I were smarter or more courageous I would probably be a busker or a surfer. (but I don't have the chops!)

A:

Good questions...

I think first and foremost the focus should be on getting psychedelics approved as medicines for very particular medical conditions which will be heavily regulated by the government.

In the long run I think people should be allowed to experiment with these substances in very controlled and safe environments - just as psychedelics have been used in most ancient cultures for millennia.

But as you say, I think a lot of education is needed to prepare society for this kind of wider societal use.

Psychedelics are certainly not for everyone, but they can clearly be of great benefit to some people and some of those people have been a great benefit to society as a whole: e.g. Steve Jobs, Jimmi Hendrix, the Beatles, and Nobel Prize winning scientist Francis Crick


Q:

[deleted]

A:

Hi and thanks for doing this AMA. NYT recently ran a story on micro-dosing, do you feel stories like these hint at a growing awareness or push for further study? Do you ever see LSD being legalized recreationally like marijuana?


Q:

What does he believe would have happened if they won?

How does he view his time serving his country now?

A:

Steven - what advice would you give to someone just entering into recovery after most of a lifetime of drug addiction?

Deanna - what advice would you give to the friends and loved ones of someone just entering recovery?


Q:

Have you ever had a problem with the people you have employed. If not, have you had a problem with customers viewing your restaurant?

A:

How many detainees did you personally speak with?


Q:

what inspire you to make alive inside? how did this idea come to you? was it like one morning in the shower?

A:

Hi and thanks for doing this AMA. NYT recently ran a story on micro-dosing, do you feel stories like these hint at a growing awareness or push for further study? Do you ever see LSD being legalized recreationally like marijuana?


Q:

It pissed me off because we all had been cooperating with lawyers and the city. Then that happened and nobody took it seriously and they wanted to go after those two.

A:

I think we are a very long way away from legalization of psychedelics. The best we can hope for is that they might be rescheduled so that it becomes easier to do scientific research

At the moment they are classed along with the most dangerous and addictive drugs which is actually crazy because they are extremely non-toxic and non-addictive and very little social damage has come from them

There are so many more cannabis users that it will be hard for there to ever be enough popular support to force psychedelic legalization, but if enough convincing science comes out that shows the potential benefits of these substances then who knows? It's hard to argue with science.

I believe there is a very long way to go in terms of changing the public image around psychedelics, but I believe Silicon Valley are a very powerful influence on the whole world, so maybe they can bring about change faster than one might expect


Q:

"Many more soldiers would have had to stay in combat and in Russia." He doesn't talk about other things that would or could have happened in Germany.

"I wasted five years of my youth there." He is very negative about it now, obviously.

A:

Steven: Be patient. Just live your life one second, one day at a time. Hang around with people who are not addicts. You are who you hang around with. If you hang around with junkies, you are going to be a junkie. If you hang out with nice, happy, good loving, caring people, you're going to be good, happy, loving, caring person. Definitely go to meetings and listen, and talk. One thing that is really cool about my mom writing her book and then me writing me book was that you should take a pen and paper and write down your life. Be completely honest, it's yourself, you can't lie to yourself, even though people do. Be completely honest and write down your life, everything that was good and bad, and read it, and then burn it and move forward.

Deanna: I am so glad that Steven is back with me, he's back on top, He knows what he's doing. To make sure that everyone out there can find strength and inspiration from this book and hopefully free themselves from addiction.

Deanna: I would also say the same thing, go to these meetings. You can go to Al-Anon, you could go to AA, talk to your friends, talk to your minister, talk to your Rabbi, just don't keep it inside. Don't be like me, where I kept everything inside and denied everything. When I finished writing this book, it was so cathartic for me, because all of a sudden I don't care if anyone knew what was going on in my life. It was wonderful. I'm not ashamed anymore that my son is called a "drug addict" and "alcoholic. “it’s okay I'm not alone. I want people to realize this, that they are not alone.

Steven: Don't give up on this person that you love and just realize that it's a disease. Just like if you had asthma or cancer, you're not going to give up on that person because they need an inhaler. It's a disease. When I was doing drugs and I was hurting my mom, my family, my wife, people around me, I wasn't doing it on purpose. I wasn't waking up like "I'm gonna get high just so I can fuck with my family and piss them off and hurt them." It's a disease and you have to be patient. Don't give up.

Deanna: The book "Sweet Child of Mine" has everything that I went through. I never gave up on my son. He'll tell you, he can stop calling me for a year, and as soon as he called me, I was there in five minutes. I never gave up on him and these parents should never give up on their children because they're babies! They're children.


Q:

Nothing outside of what you would encounter in a normal restaurant, in fact we probably have less. Our biggest issues are more finding ways to help our students overcome their issues more then incidents taking place at the restaurant.

A:

Customs and Border Patrol is refusing to allow attorneys to speak with detainees. In violation of the court order.


Q:

I got hired to make a website for a guy. He took me into a nursing home. It was like Dante's Inferno!

Henry was in a wheelchair, parked in the hallway. He spent every day for the last 10 years like that. We gave him some Cab Calloway and he woke up- as you may know- the clip of Henry from "Alive Inside" first went viral on Reddit! https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/1h50hy/old_man_in_nursing_home_reacts_to_hearing_music/

I knew in that moment I had to make "Alive Inside"- it took me 3 years.

A:

I think we are a very long way away from legalization of psychedelics. The best we can hope for is that they might be rescheduled so that it becomes easier to do scientific research

At the moment they are classed along with the most dangerous and addictive drugs which is actually crazy because they are extremely non-toxic and non-addictive and very little social damage has come from them

There are so many more cannabis users that it will be hard for there to ever be enough popular support to force psychedelic legalization, but if enough convincing science comes out that shows the potential benefits of these substances then who knows? It's hard to argue with science.

I believe there is a very long way to go in terms of changing the public image around psychedelics, but I believe Silicon Valley are a very powerful influence on the whole world, so maybe they can bring about change faster than one might expect


Q:

The text was removed. What did you place in Boston that they thought was a bomb?

A:

thanks for the idea, but will the PDF be of a high enough resolution? I'll give it a try!


Q:

Good morning! Thanks for taking your time to answer questions. What was your daily routine as a POW? Do you remember ever feeling a sense of "normalcy" during your time as a POW?

A:

Hi Steven! Thanks for doing this AMA!

Which was the first "hooooooly shit we're huge" moment while on GNR?


Q:

How do you find former inmates for your staff—do they come to you through a referral program or do you post the jobs online, or...something else?

Also, congratulations! Rehabilitation and restoration of people who have criminal backgrounds is a special passion of mine and I love stories like yours!

A:

What do you do day to day in your job as an attorney?


Q:

What was your favorite movie from last year and your most Anticipated movie for this year?

A:

thanks for the idea, but will the PDF be of a high enough resolution? I'll give it a try!


Q:

Working on getting the text back. But here you go for the overview.

A:

Thanks. I love it too

I just got my print, I'm so proud of it. I'm not sure if you can get prints - maybe get in touch with Film Rise (our distributors) directly or ask them on facebook/twitter


Q:

"We had to work for 8 hours a day in 3 shifts. We couldn't do much in our free time and were just happy to lay down and rest. From time to time i could help out at the theatre in the camp and moved the backgrounds. There were also some real actors.

Especially Paul Streckfuß (Note: who became an actor in the GDR after the war) was a good friend of mine during that time, but he was more of a regisseur director in the camp and he was a true communist. He also was the negotiator for the german prisoners, despite being a prisoner himself. When the actors practiced or had a show, they would get extra food from the kitchen afterwards, which i got too, as i was helping them.

The food was basically the same every day for months. It was mainly white cabbage soup.

We got loose tobaco once a week which was smoked with the "Pravda", the russian newspaper. I always exchanged it for bread though and i didn't smoke a single cigarette in my life"

A:

Steven: When we played the street scene in 1986, downtown LA. There were 100,000 people in the streets, outside, and we started playing. Literally not 10s, or 100s, thousands of people were spitting on the stage at us. I was in the back, so I wasn't getting hit. The coolest thing was, nobody in the band got pissed off , they started spitting back at them. It was one of those moments like "holy shit! What am I doing here? How did I get here? and Why is this so awesome!"

Deanna: I'm so glad I wasn't there.

Steven: That and playing with The Rolling Stones at the coliseum was pretty fucking cool!


Q:

There are a number of different routes. We teach in prison, have connections with local judges, parole officers, etc. We also get good responses from our stories and features in the media.

A:

I have a law degree but I am a campaigner here with a broad portfolio of responsibilities. Sometimes it's holding a spine behind a senator who needs one; sometimes it's analyzing policy.


Q:

Not sure I have a faborite but I really liked The Big Short

You?

A:

Thanks. I love it too

I just got my print, I'm so proud of it. I'm not sure if you can get prints - maybe get in touch with Film Rise (our distributors) directly or ask them on facebook/twitter


Q:

To us in "the industry" your a hero.

A:

I actually did ask them--as they responded to a FB message as I was exiting the theater last week--they said there was no way :(


Q:

I congratulate you on not ever smoking especially in a time where it was basically deemed healthy, thats a huge accomplishment and, this might sound offensive, but it is probably the main reason you are still so active today compared to others your age. Not to mention you probably got made fun of for it/peer pressured into it all the time in the military, since thats about all there was to do on your down time. My grandfather died after 10 years mostly stuck in the house on oxygen and my father (60) has COPD, so I've always decided against cigarettes.

A:

Hey Steven, First off I'd like to say thank you for all the work thag you've done with GnR, Adler's Appetite, and Adler. Your drumming inspired me to become a drummer myself. My question is: Do you have any advice for up and coming musicians?


Q:

What has been the reaction around Cleveland with you hiring convicts at an upscale restaurant?

A:

A T-Rex?


Q:

What was your favorite movie from last year and your most Anticipated movie for this year?

A:

I actually did ask them--as they responded to a FB message as I was exiting the theater last week--they said there was no way :(


Q:

Thanks! Not sure what cape to wear.

A:

really? That's kind of stupid. I'll ask them too


Q:

He thinks the same way "Many of the smokers died because they did trade in their food for tobaco. Thank you for your answer"

A:

Steven: Practice, practice, practice. Repetition makes the master. Stay away from alcohol and drugs and you can't lose.

Deanna: I agree with Steven, especially about staying away from alcohol and drugs. He practices every single day.

Steven: Alcohol and drugs are a waste of time.

Deanna: 3-4 hours a day he practices, even now.

Steven: That is because I love to play. Always practice and play with everybody and anybody you can.


Q:

Very positive. We're the pride of #CLE. People have really embraced it and they're quite proud of what we've accomplished. We've received national recognition, which highlights how proud CLE is. More than $8 million has come through the doors. It's been a smashing success.

A:

The plastic spine I held up.


Q:

Dear Reddit,

I'm going to dinner now and will come back one last time to answer any last questions! Thanks for all the support today.

A:

really? That's kind of stupid. I'll ask them too


Q:

Why was one place near/at New England Medical Center ( now Tufts Medical center)? I couldn't understand at the time why your company/contacters would place one at a Hospital.

A:

Why are people more vocal about drug freedom than they are about Healthcare, gun control and other issues that plague the US?


Q:

Hello,

Could he tell us more about the propaganda that went around the time that made him believe it was the right thing to do? Also what gave the soldiers hope towards the end of the war? How was it to come back in Germany? How much did it all change?

A:

I Steve, big fan here, missed you in the Chile show a couple of months ago. Do you think that your stroke, affected in someway your actual drums play? Also, I think your the most resilient rock star ever, you're an example to a lot of people


Q:

Do you have any favorite stories to share about people who have worked at Edwin's and have now moved on to other things?

A:

Are you going to now start following him around with a pair of truck nuts?


Q:

Hi Brian, when you wrote your songs, what where the bands that inspired you?

A:

Why are people more vocal about drug freedom than they are about Healthcare, gun control and other issues that plague the US?


Q:

I don't remember which locations were done for what reason. Perhaps there were a bunch of medical students or we were looking at the Tufts crowd? Sorry there was not a huge amount of strategy around location except to be in general areas where people who watch the show hung out or lived. Clearly we made a mistake being near a hospital.

A:

Are they?

I think it just depends on who you're hanging around with


Q:

About the Propaganda he says: " As a 16 year old, you can believe in a lot. I was in the Hitlerjugend, in the Jungvolk. We did excercises on training grounds. Also when we got a new gymnasium, Göring was there for the inauguration and we all had to attend there. Back then we found it great, it gave us hope.".

About the hope of soldiers at the end of the war, he talked about it in another comment. There was a rumour of a secret weapon that would turn around the odds for the Germans in the war again."

About coming back and the drive back from the prisoners camp in Russia he says: "We were brought to Friedland. There was a camp for us where we got registered. From there we could take the train back home. All of it took a couple of days. I traveled with people from other camps as well. We were all very happy to be on the way back."

A:

Steven: Hi u/f3lip3, thank you very much. And no, I had a mild stroke when I was shooting cocaine. The only thing that it affected was my speech. I basically had to go back to Kindergarten and learn how to speak again. Dr. Drew, when I did that celebrity rehab, he had a special speech therapist come in and actually teach me how to speak again. I mean I can barely speak fucking English, as it is, but it's much better than it was in 1994.

Deanna: When I found out he was in the hospital because nobody would tell me when he would have an overdose. Nobody would tell me because they didn't want me to know because he has numerous times he's had an overdose, but I never knew. Well, this time, I found out because the nurse from the Century City Hospital calls me up on the phone and says, "Your son needs dialysis". I said, "What do you mean?". And she says, "Well, he came in yesterday from a drug overdose". I said, "So, give him dialysis. What's the big thing?". Well, I had to sign a paper for him to have it. So, she faxed me over a paper. I signed the paper. He had dialysis. So, then I went to the hospital to see him. I walk into this room and he is attached to so many tubes. And I said, "Oh my god, I've never seen anything like this before". So, I sat down next to him. I says, "Steven", cause I heard that people in a coma they can hear you, so I sat down next to him and said, "Steven, Steven, please wake up. Everything's going to be alright". And then what happened was, he opened one eye and a single tear came out of that one eye. A single tear. And then he closed his eye again. And then, of course, I burst out crying. I mean, it was so horrible. I told the doctors. When I was at the hospital, that day, his lawyer came over. Former lawyer, came over to see him.

Steven: His name was Satan.

Deanna: His name was Satan.

Steven: Louis Cypher, I recall. Louis Cypher. Lu-ci-fer. Louis Cypher. Yea.

Deanna: I said thank you for coming over, but he's in a coma. He said, "I just wanted to check up on him". I said, "Fine". A few weeks later, I got a bill. He charged us for going to the hospital to look at Steven when he was in a coma.

Steven: For 30 seconds.

Deanna: 30 seconds!

Steven: He just looked in at the door and went, "Okay".

Deanna: That's how people take advantage of people that are drug addicts and alcohol abusers. They take advantage of you and it's not right. So, I called up the lawyer. I says, "What it this? I see you're charging him for him for you coming to visit him in the hospital. Are you nuts?". I said, "You better take that off the bill". And he took it off the bill. But, can you imagine going to the hospital to check on a client, just to say hello and see how you're doing and he charges for that? That was sick.


Q:

They're all favorites because our graduates have shown great courage. But Lynn graduated in 2016, and has since bought his own hot dog cart, Udi Dogs. He comes by the restaurant every few weeks so the staff and students get to enjoy his food. I loved being able to send Darwin, our current sous chef, to France, too.

A:

ALSO: the Senate is about to hold a debate on confirming Rex Tillerson. Senate Democrats are trying to hold it up. Call your Senators and tell them to Reject Rex!


Q:

Townes Van Zandt Muddy Waters Guy Clark Hendrix Dylan Beatles Steve Earle Jerry Garcia John Prime Clapton and Townes Van Zandt

A:

Are they?

I think it just depends on who you're hanging around with


Q:

Why do you think Boston authorities were the only ones stupid enough to think Mooninites were bombs?

A:

Here are a few more - Wilmar H. Shiras - "Children of the Atom"; Frank Herbert - "The Santroga Barrier"; Eric Frank Russell - "Wasp" & "And Then There Were None"; Chester Anderson - "The Butterfly Kid"; John Brunner - "Dreaming Earth"; Aldous Huxley - "Island"

nonfiction Steve Silberman - "Neurotribes"


Q:

What was the education in Jungvolk, HJ, etc...about? Did they ever focus so much on race theory and how Germans were the master-race, as is often said today by historians?

Did they push people to have kids very soon with girls, be promiscuous, with the idea of a Germany with high population? (Considering he had many kids, that may have had a part in it)

A:

Hey Steven! I have a few, hopefully simple, quick questions.

  1. Why do they call you Steven 'Popcorn' Adler? Is it cause you're energetic, and bounce up and down when you're beating on the drums?

And

  1. Will you be joining GNR for a larger portion of the NITL Tour? Rather than a few appearances here and there?

Those are my two questions that I had to ask. Ps you fucking rock dude much love ❤️


Q:

Is Darwin going to a culinary school? That sounds amazing.

A:

Why is Rex Tillerson bad for the planet?


Q:

Do you have any directorial advice?

A:

Here are a few more - Wilmar H. Shiras - "Children of the Atom"; Frank Herbert - "The Santroga Barrier"; Eric Frank Russell - "Wasp" & "And Then There Were None"; Chester Anderson - "The Butterfly Kid"; John Brunner - "Dreaming Earth"; Aldous Huxley - "Island"

nonfiction Steve Silberman - "Neurotribes"


Q:

It was a bit of a dangerous feeling time, even though it was 6 years post 9/11. We were up in 9 other markets without incident. When I met with the police and Homeland Security in NY, the cops here said 'of course the Boston cops would freak out.'

A:

Have you seen Arrival?

I didn't see it on LSD, but it's an amazing movie I think


Q:

They did talk about race theory and such things in the Hitlerjugend.

He went to a Wehrertüchtigungslager (paramilitary training camp) with 15. They had to learn how great the war is and had to crawl through a field with gas masks on, while it was raining. When they would come back to the shack which you were living in with 10 people, all their clothes were thrown on the floor from their lockers. Then they had to sort through all their clothes and after half an hour there was roll call and everything had to be clean. The supervisor came in with white gloves with which he checked all the doors and stuff for dust.

When he was a soldier there was this thing called Selbsterziehung (self-discipline). If someone stole, then everyone had to suffer from that. In the night the Holy spirit would come into the shack and the person who stole didn't know about it. He would get a blanket over his head and then his trousers would get dragged down. Then he'd get hit by the leather of a belt and afterwards get black boot polish rubbed on it. In the morning for the Roll call he had to be clean again then. This was called self-discipline.

A:

Steven: I think that's what Axl was thinking. We played that show at the Ritz that was live on MTV one night and he introduced me as Steven Popcorn Adler. That one and only time. He would always introduce me as Steven California Indica Bud Adler. I'm a big pot smoker. So, that one night that it happened to be live on TV, out of nowhere he just called me popcorn and it just stuck. I think it was like when I play my hair bounces up and down. Like popcorn popping in a machine. I don't know. He's insane. I don't know why the hell he did it. It just happened. He just called me that.

Deanna: I never like that, by the way. I never liked that.

Steven: I had a great time last year doing the couple shows that I got to do with them, but it was everything that I thought it was going to be. It was the complete opposite. If it was going be just the five original guys with Dizzy and Axl, Slash, and Duff and myself, then yes I will, but otherwise, it's not the magic and it's not fair to the fans. Me and Dizzy actually really do wanna be a part of it.


Q:

Our goal is to help our graduates get jobs in other restaurants to broaden their experience and leadership skills, but Darwin was so strong that, after graduation, we hired him as a sous chef. Now he's able to mentor and teach while he's also learning himself.

I told Darwin, like I tell all of our graduates, never stop learning but if you're set on going to culinary school, make sure you spend a few years in the industry first. You'll be surprised at how much you know and can learn just by doing.

A:

Rex Tillerson spent his entire career at ExxonMobil. His job was to find, extract, and burn carbon. Which, as everyone but this administration knows, causes climate change. Which is really bad for the planet. That's the short answer. There are many more reasons, ask away!


Q:

Yes.

Act. Write. Shovel dirt. Read. Doubt. Watch films more than once.

Don't cross the line. Unless it is cool.

A:

Have you seen Arrival?

I didn't see it on LSD, but it's an amazing movie I think


Q:

What is some of your other bigger works that we would recognize?

A:

You hear a lot of propoganda about LSD but you also hear from past users who did a lot of LSD and now struggle to think clearly and rationally and refer to themselves as acid casualties. Do you believe that LSD can have such a negative effect (apart from causing psychotic breaks in the already mentally ill)?


Q:

Good afternoon :-). I would like to know if your grandfather knew anything about the extermination camps and what was his response too it?

I know it is a emotionally difficult question. I am a Dutch guy living on the border with Germany and know many German people. The German side is often forgotten.. indoctrination is a thing that many people should read more about. And thank you for this AmA

A:

Hi Steven, have any crazy stories from touring in Canada?


Q:

What were the most difficult obstacles to overcome in getting your business off the ground, and successful?

A:

Also, what was the airport like last night?


Q:

What was it like touring the festival circuit? How did you get there?

A:

You hear a lot of propoganda about LSD but you also hear from past users who did a lot of LSD and now struggle to think clearly and rationally and refer to themselves as acid casualties. Do you believe that LSD can have such a negative effect (apart from causing psychotic breaks in the already mentally ill)?


Q:

I infiltrated the USOpen on behalf of the Le Tigre clothing brand. I also launched the first cellphone with a camera on behalf of SONY Ericsson with 300 fake tourists. I made the world's largest hashtag made out of ice for Showtime. I had the internet destroy a sculpture for a make-up brand.

A:

I think you're right. A lot of the scare stories are just plain fabrications that were part of a huge propaganda campaign against LSD - like the idea that LSD causes deformed babies!

That said, LSD is the most powerful drug to act on the brain ever invented and people have used the substance very recklessly - especially in the 60s when everything was so new and there was so little guidance on offer, but even today.

Set and setting is extremely important for psychedelics - as Mike Randal says: "waves, not raves". A lot of people make the mistake of taking LSD at a rave when they are already wasted and it's a very intense situation that can lead to some pretty unpleasant experiences.

I can believe that people have done real damage to themselves by taking excessive amounts of LSD with the wrong set and setting. But that said, you can do damage to yourself with pretty much anything. As Prof David Nutt pointed out, you are statistically much more likely to damage yourself riding a horse than taking MDMA or LSD.

There are risks involved in everything, but LSD is an obvious substance that people should treat with great respect and caution.


Q:

"We didn't know about it before and during the war. Even in Russia we didn't know about concentration camps. Only after the war we got informations about it." He is laughing a bit about the question what his response to it was since it is clear to him how wrong such things are.

A:

Steven: I love Canada. You're so lucky that you live there. Yes, we were touring with "Iron Maiden" and one night me and Nicko McBrain went out to this bar. We were in Quebec, French Canada, and it was just a beautiful town and it was snowing. Me and Nicko, we were hanging in a bar and we were doing shots. We did like maybe 8, 9 shots and then the 10th shot he did, everything was going great between us, we were having a good time, and then once he took that 10th shot, he got so crazy and turned into a different person and was going to kick my ass. All we were doing was just sitting there talking and that one drink just was the one that broke him. And you've seen this guy. This is one ugly motherfucker, okay. He'll kick your ass just by you looking at his face. So, I was all whooah, one second, one moment here, I'm gonna go outside for a second and I'm gonna come back in and we'll try this again. I walked outside and I left. I remember walking through the snow on these cobblestone streets, freezing my ass off, going what the fuck just happened? What the hell just happened?


Q:

All the obstacles have been great opportunities. The one in particular was raising capital. It took years but made great relationships.

A:

Answered in another thread:

By last evening, things weren't chaotic because lawyers weren't allowed to see detainees and CBP still refused to speak to us or the elected officials that came to the airport. Not lawyers could do while CBP is still violating the court order and information on those detained and deported is not yet available. We are working our hardest to get that information!


Q:

OMG, the Festival circuit is so much fun! Really- I can't wait to do it again!

A:

I think you're right. A lot of the scare stories are just plain fabrications that were part of a huge propaganda campaign against LSD - like the idea that LSD causes deformed babies!

That said, LSD is the most powerful drug to act on the brain ever invented and people have used the substance very recklessly - especially in the 60s when everything was so new and there was so little guidance on offer, but even today.

Set and setting is extremely important for psychedelics - as Mike Randal says: "waves, not raves". A lot of people make the mistake of taking LSD at a rave when they are already wasted and it's a very intense situation that can lead to some pretty unpleasant experiences.

I can believe that people have done real damage to themselves by taking excessive amounts of LSD with the wrong set and setting. But that said, you can do damage to yourself with pretty much anything. As Prof David Nutt pointed out, you are statistically much more likely to damage yourself riding a horse than taking MDMA or LSD.

There are risks involved in everything, but LSD is an obvious substance that people should treat with great respect and caution.


Q:

What is the next big thing for marketing?

A:

Hi, what was your opinion of the war during that time? Like who did you think was right or wrong?


Q:

What do you miss most about the rock n roll scene from the 80s compared to today?

A:

What has been the most negative experience you have had with an employee or applicant?


Q:

In your opinion, how effective is a viral photo/video in bringing about actual change? My worry is that this was a Buzzfeed laugh of the day and no more. But my hope is that Marco Rubio is stewing and plotting for the day when he will rise up and say, "Let's dispel with this fiction that Marco Rubio doesn't have a backbone..."

A:

Do you have any advice on set control?


Q:

There is a bit of fatigue with creating FOMO for those viewing on social media networks, so the more you can create opportunities for people to engage with a brand, either digitally or in person, the better chance you have for that person to be a brand evangelist for you. This is a vague statement but also the driving theme of much of current marketing.

A:

"It was wrong but we did believe in it. Back then though, we didn't find it wrong. Back then there was the hope of a Wunderwaffe (wonder weapon) that would still win us the war. That was a rumour going around. My view changed when I was a prisoner of war. Then I realized that it was wrong."


Q:

Steven: It was more exciting back then 'cause you didn't find out everything like you do now. Everything is instantly over people's phones and everything. It was like exciting to read magazines and read about your bands and what's going on and it's just a completely different world now. I think I got to catch the end of when rock was really rock. That's what I miss. I miss going to record stores and hanging out. I miss going to magazine stands and reading magazines and looking at pictures. I miss looking at record albums and reading all the liner notes and looking at the pictures in the sleeves and reading how they did the record and what happened. That was exciting. Nowadays, it's nothing. You just push a button and you're on the computer. There's no liner notes. There's maybe one goofy picture that's been photoshopped. I like the real stuff. I like real instruments. Reality. Real. People practicing. I've never known one person that practices as a teenager and looked in the mirror and was air guitar playing practice to see how they look and thinking in their head, "Oh, I just wanna play for myself". No, it's that I wanna play for the world. And I miss that whole real kinda rock thing, ya know. Music.

Deanna: I miss him. That's it.

Steven: She misses me practicing my drums in the bedroom. Oh god, please stop! Pleeease!

Deanna: That's exactly right.

Steven: When he goes to school, I'm throwing these out.

A:

Attitudes, mostly poor attitudes, coming in with a sense of entitlement.


Q:

Us too. Trolling is fun but I think you effectively answered your question. Rest assured, carrying a spine around is not all we're doing.

A:

Not really, I am a doc filmmaker.

With docs- no babies or pets.

or crazy people. Well, you can't avoid crazy people- so no advice.


Q:

any chance I might be able to donate some money for a replica?

A:

What was it specifically about being a prisoner of war that made you change your view? Were you just given the bigger picture by the guards etc.?


Q:

What music are you listening to these days?

A:

What reaction did you usually got when you told someone about your idea of starting this program?


Q:

Anything to help with the fact that I always feel like a nuisance asking for favours or calling in chits? Anything like this happen to you when you first started?

A:

I do get this request a lot. Sadly part of the settlement was them taking the remainder of stock. Tho one of each character (ignignokt and err) may have made it to my wall.


Q:

" We got political education during my time as a prisoner of war. But there we were educated on the great things that communism does. I did everything that was asked from me. Hitler and the dictatorship, communism as a prisoner of war and afterwards democracy. Only when I came back from Russia did I see the good of democracy." He's having difficulties being able to describe what made him change his views and understanding the question. But he says: "First of all we lost the war. And then we saw how everything got better here in westgermany." So I guess that gave him a change of heart?

He became a prisoner of war on the day that Germany lost the war, so during his time in Russia he was always aware of that fact.

A:

These days, I still listen to the same music I did when I was growing up.


Q:

You are a fucking idiot, or something similar to that.

A:

You must serve people! You gotta remember your project does not matter. How you are helping the other is what allows you to ask people to help you!!!


Q:

Oh man I totally remember this happening, being your typical teenage stoner who loved Aqua Teen, and finding it the funniest thing in the world.

Were there any legal or negative ramifications to the whole incident? Or just a bunch of federal agents pissed off for having their time wasted?

Are you a fan of the show? Damn shame how they were cancelled like they were.

A:

Thank you for posting those pictures.

I had a good friend who was a German about your Opa's age during the war and was drafted into the labor army and later the anti-air auxiliary in Eastern Germany operating 20mm cannons. I like to imagine that somewhere in your pictures he might be there. Ever meet a man named Vern Morrow? He would have been about mid/late teens during the war like yourself and with a similar vocation, he was also a troublemaker :P worth a shot!

My actual questions:

  1. My friend told me that their gun crew was mainly captured Russians overseen by a couple young Germans. Was this the case for your crew as well? If so can you tell us a little about them or your gun crew's situation? My friend seemed to have forged quite a bond with his fellow crew members (despite obvious barriers to friendship) and was very sad to tell me that most fled the advancing Red Army as the war went on, fearing reprisals.

  2. What's your funniest personal story from that time? I know this sounds strange, with the war being such a heavy topic, but you were a young man and young men always try to have fun despite the circumstances. Soldiers tend to be a bit of a goofy bunch at times. My friend's memoirs are dotted with funny experiences during the war, mostly having to do with his many run ins with authority.


Q:

Hey Steven and Deanna! Thanks for doing this AMA. Question: is rock & roll dead once your generation is gone? If not, who is going to keep it going?

A:

Do you take reservations? I'll bring my clients next time I visit Cleveland for business.


Q:

After I said it I looked up the movie and you are gong to be alright i think. That movie was made so long ago. Not that many people can know of it.

A:

I did like the show. It as a fun brand to work on. I think the whole marketing team got cut as well after this which was a shame. There were actually pretty serious ramifications. Turner paid over 2Million in fines to Boston, some lessor amounts to other cities once they saw it was payment time. I personally spent over 6 figures on legal expenses. Luckily nothing criminal came out of it.


Q:
  1. He says that they had captured Russians for their crew. They had to carry the ammunition. In times of of bombardment, they would hide in the bunker and the german officers forced them to go outside again using their guns. They also had Russian gun carriages which had 8,5 caliber. They were extended to fit the German 8,8 caliber and after around 100 shots the pipes got so warm that they couldn't use them anymore.

His crew was mostly people from his class and from his village and from around the other villages.

  1. He can't remember anything in particular unfortunately. That weren't the times for it, he says.
A:

Steven: All I know is that the gods of rock are pissed! I think I am afraid Rock and Roll might be dead. There are just no great bands out there. The last great band that I know of was the Foo Fighters, and that was 25 years ago.

Deanna: I don't believe it will ever die. When he was playing in the 80s, we would go on sunset blvd and see all these guys with the black leather jackets

Steven: But that was the 80s, this is 2017. Music is completely different now. It sucks!

Deanna: a few weeks ago we were going down sunset blvd. There are so many young people. I don't think it will ever die. What goes around comes around, it's always gonna be there. I still listen to oldies but goodies. Good music comes back.


Q:

Always, give us a call at 216.921.3333 or visit our website edwinsrestaurant.org

A:

I agree. I even like the idea that I'm doing a nod to it!

But I do appreciate your analysis


Q:

Do you feel any kinship with the mooninites?

A:

It's always amazing to me that people find goodness, friendship and bright moments in the middle of terrible events and circumstances. Do you have any good memories from your time as a prisoner of war? What helped you get through that time?


Q:

Hi Steven, how surreal was it to be in a band with your friend growing up and make it big? Does your mom have any funny/interesting stories about Slash from when he was younger?

A:

How have you mastered fine dining, breathing, AND remembered your name?


Q:

Well I have the advantage of starting this in my forties, I have tried to get my sixteen year old daughter to read the Art of Communication to try and get her to quiet her mind and take some time away from her iPhone and being connected. Just left Sundance and spent stayed with a legit hip hop star and he and his wife are working on TM. You work really hard and then you start to wonder why, divorce, stress etc... and you look around out how messed up everyone is so you try and find something that makes sense....

A:

I feel we share a special hand gesture.


Q:

"We were allowed to write short cards/messages home, that gave hope. He also says that "the Russians that worked with us Germans in that factory had it worse than us. We were treated less worse than them." I am not sure if that was a bit of hope for him (as macabre as it is), if he sees it positive. He mentioned it though. He also says that helping with the theater in the Camp helped.

A:

Steven: It was a dream come true. Every musician that I can imagine, having a friend that was as talented as Slash was and being able to be a part of him and his life and us doing it together was just so fun and so magical. Everything in our lives just fell into place. It's not like we had to do anything extraordinary. We just woke up in the morning and did what we did and it just worked. It was magic.

Deanna: I didn't really know Slash when he was young because Steven was living with his Grandmother and so they hung out together, of course. But I don't really have any stories about him.

Steven: It's funny, I was the bad influence on Slash. I'm the one who got him to start ditching school. And turned him onto Rock 'n Roll.


Q:

It's just life. It's the world in which I exist and the world in which we exist. It's like asking a boy, "How do you become a man?" It's just the way it is.

But isolation from the outside helps. Keeping clarity.

A:

Yeah man, it's really interesting journey this thing called life. And the twist of it all is the truth of it is nothing like what "they" say it is! 40 is a great time to master this stuff, actually it's about the time most people do.


Q:

So, is this some thing that graces your resume or other wise comes up in a positive light? Do you hide it from Employers as far as some thing so infamous is possible to conceal?

A:

How do you feel about neo-Nazism and what would you like to say to someone who believes in it?
Thank you for answering these questions. Have a nice day!


Q:

Hi Steven, If you had the choice to play any Guns tune other than Appetite/Lies material, which one would you choose?

A:

The concept of the business, is a great stepping stone btw. What is he hiring process like? Do you recruit or do people come to you seeking work?


Q:

Google sort of reveals all. And I basically ran my company for 15 years so I didn't mind talking about it as I was not looking for a job. In fact many potential partners or employers want to know the story.

A:

"They should go to Russia and see what happened there." He does not like people like that at all. Also I have to say that I don't think he met a lot of Neo-Nazis in his time. Our village thankfully doesn't have any, as far as I know.


Q:

Steven: Back Off Bitch, Don't Cry, You Can Be Mine, Coma, Civil War.

A:

Process is simple. Sign up, interview, GO. We don't recruit, its all about word of mouth. The difficult part is the first three weeks, which is like a boot camp, a lot of people don't make it out.


Q:

What is the very best cheese?

A:

How do you feel when young people say things like "___ is literally Hitler"?

How do you feel about comparisons drawn between modern politics and those of Germany in the 30s and 40s?

You were young when Hitler came to power and still young when the war broke out. How involved we're you in politics? How much did you understand?

Thank you for doing this AmA. I agree with your grandchildren that it is important to preserve the memories of our elders, regardless of whether we agree with what they did, or not.

EDIT: I didn't allow for Germany having different social norms. It makes sense that they don't refer to Hitler in such flippant ways.


Q:

What is your biggest regret about the years you lost to the hard drugs you took?

A:

I can imagine it is tough maybe adjusting. Like the work in the culinary area is demanding. Mental toughness


Q:

Might I recommend this?

A:
  1. "In itself I don't like it if people do this comparison. But with the new american president it is difficult not to draw the parallels" (He had some difficulties really grasping what you meant with this question, I think. I don't think he meets a lot of people who throw these comparisons around so easily (maybe it is more of an internet thing)).

  2. He doesn't see the comparison between modern politics and those of germany in the 30s and 40s. At least not in Germany itself. Other places might be different though.

  3. "We were raised to believe in it. I was in the Hitlerjugend and afterwards we had to join the party. I was 16 when I joined the party. But I was too young for politics. We only believed in what they told us."


Q:

Steven: Losing those years to the hard drugs and alcohol! It was a waste of time.

A:

You nailed it, toughness, especially mental toughness is what you need to succeed in life


Q:

Are you or your company involved in ARGs? I expected that if there ever was confusion regarding an advertising campaign (and ARGs are that, too, I think?) it would have been something other than what transpired here.

A:

What is your opinion on the many European (and American) far-right populist movements that have become so popular in the last year - do you have concerns that what you went through may happen to your children's or grandchildren's generations?


Q:

What's the worst experience you ever had with a fan?

A:

So we have the restaurant boom in Cleveland, but it's threatened by lack of good staff. How is the institute responding to this issue and how in demand are the students?


Q:

We dabbled in ARGs and I knew some of the initial companies jumping into that space. The real issue is that virtually every municipality has different rules for what you can and can't do and it literally makes it impossible to do a multi-city public experience that does not fall into the small buckets of what is 'allowed.' Most companies just find other ways to execute the idea.

A:

He doesn't like these movements at all. There was a recent comment from Höcke, an AfD politician about the Holocaust memorial which my grandfather found awful. He says that Höcke should be send to Russia to a prisoners camp to experience what he experienced and then he wouldn't say these things. He says that these populists have no idea what they are talking about.


Q:

Steven: Hi u/fuck_you_in_the_valley

This one girl, right after a show, I was walking to the bus and this one girl got so excited to see me that she jumped on me and pulled my back out. I had to miss like 10 shows because she hurt my back.

A:

The restaurant boom is, in fact, true, but the general idea of lack of good staff is not the problem; it's a lack of training. It's restaurant owners who don't know how to train or don't want to train because they expanded into too many restaurants too rapidly.

We don't have a difficult time running a fine dining restaurant. We have a waiting list of people who want to be involved. And it's not the staff, it's the training. We get people in here with no experience, and we train them to be the best.

We respond by training to the top and training leaders. Currently, there are 40 restaurants who are on a list waiting to hire, so the demand is high.


Q:

I think I talked to you at the Aqua Teen Hunger Force premier at the Lowes Boston Common. What drugs were you on that day?

A:

Hi Deanna. How did you deal with noise from your son when he was growing up?


Q:

What's your favorite meal to cook at home?

A:

I wasn't at the premier so it must have been another marketer.


Q:

Steven: You tell ‘em the truth. You threw my drums right on the sidewalk.

Deanna: I didn't deal well with it.

Steven: I went to school, the drums were on the sidewalk.

Deanna: When he was a baby, he was 2 years old, he would sit on the kitchen floor, while I was cooking and he would take out the Tupperware and the wooden spoons and he would be pounding on the Tupperware. I would play oldies but goodies!

Steven: 50's. Frankie Valli, Frankie Avalon, Veronica.

Deanna: Yea, that's what I listened to.

Steven: Frankie Valli is god.

Deanna: So, when he would get the drums, yeah, it was very hard because the neighbors would complain. I would go to work and I'd come home and the neighbor would say, "He's been playing the drums all day. How much can I take?". No, it wasn't good. I don't suggest getting the drums.

Steven: It wasn't just that. It was just he's playing the drums all day. He's playing the drums and he stinks! If he played good, it wouldn't be so bad. Tell him to take lessons. That goddamn loud Rock 'n Roll he keeps playing.

Deanna: I don't advise any parents to buy their children a drumset.

Steven: Nowadays, you have electric drums, so you can wear headphones, so you don't bother anybody. Me personally, I love fucking with my neighbors.

A:

I'll be honest, I don't get a lot of time to cook at home, when I do its something like cereal, or a simple breakfast with my wife and kid


Q:

Damn I miss ATHF. What was Adult Swim's initial reaction to what happened?

A:

Did you fall in love with any groupies?


Q:

Any info on the butcher shop or is it still in the planning stages?

A:

To be honest? Shock. Nobody expected this, ever. After the first day I never spoke to the marketing team again, it all went through lawyers.


Q:

Steven: Everyone of them. For the 3 minutes I was with them. Yes. If you got 4 out of me, god bless you. You lucked out that day.

Deanna: One time he told me that he had sex with over 2,000 women.

Steven: I was on drugs.

Deanna: I says, "What kind of talk is that? I'm your mother. Stop it".

Steven: I remember telling my grandfather, my grandparents. I brought a gold record to each my grandma and grandpa one day and I said, "Here grandma and grandpa. Look. I'm famous now". And my grandpa says," Yeah, that and 50 cents will get you a cup of coffee". And he's right.

A:

Plans being drafted and roof being fixed now. Construction should start in May 2016.


Q:

Oh, you were that guy huh? Oh man, thank you for that.

A:

My father has been a huge fan of yours as long as I can remember. You two are around the same age, so I'd like to ask you a question for my father, if I may. Over the years, have you developed any changes to your technique, due to aging, that I can pass on that may assist him? Edit: feel free to use whatever lingo you want.. I'll be passing it on verbatim (I'm a bass guy and don't understand the shit you silly head beaters talk about)


Q:

Time travel or 2017? :)

A:

¯_(ツ)_/¯


Q:

Steven: u/Mafiya_chlenom_K I owe no money to you. No money.

Well, yes. I've gotten better. The more you practice, you know. Like I said in the past, the repetition makes the master. When I first started doing "Appetite for Destruction", the timing on that, you cannot use a metronome to that record. It will not work. It was all feel. Back when I was younger, I didn't have that much of a grasp on what timing really is. It was more about just having fun and kicking ass. And now, I'm more into learning a lot of style and perfecting myself. So, I'm practicing a lot more and watching more like Buddy Rich. I watch a lot of him playing and I'm just practicing that song. I'm definitely a lot better. I'm way more comfortable and repetition makes the master.

A:

2017, I get my years confused from time to time


Q:

What's your favorite dessert?

A:

How have members of the Cuyahoga County justice system treated you and the restaurant in the community? How have they reacted to the project, whether that be personally or within the context of policy and government?

In my experience, the Cuyahoga County judicial system seems a bit harsh toward offenders, both on a case-by-case basis and systemically. I wonder if that's your experience, and if so, how that has affected Edwin's, or how Edwin's has affected the system.

Thanks for all you do and keep up the amazing work.


Q:

Steven: Cheesecake with whip cream. Plain New York cheesecake with whip cream in the microwave for 6 seconds.

Deanna: And my favorite dessert is chocolate cream pie with whip cream. Lots of whip cream.

A:

They've been extremely receptive to it. Not only do they dine here, support us in public forums, but they've even gone so far as to set up a culinary club inside the county jail that we helped with, and they have put resources behind it.

Understand their justice system accommodates many municipalities.

We have a strong re-entry court and, if you look at the state of Ohio, we have more than double the amount of people coming home after prison than that of the second-largest county, yet our recidivism is lower than they state average by half a percent.

It may be a tough system, but it's a good system.


Q:

Hi Steven your an amazing artist and your work with GNR is awesome! Really good to hear that you were able to get clean, and that your mother helped you. Mothers are the best, what do you think was the most important thing she did that helped you? Also what are you listening to now in terms of music?

A:

Thank you for what you are doing! The system makes it so hard for ex convicts to make a living and avoid reverting to crime once they are out of prison. You are doing an awesome thing giving these folks a second chance at life. How passionate are the employees? Do you look into what they were in prison for, if so whats some of the common crimes they did time for?


Q:

Steven: The most important was love, support, and not giving up on me. No matter what an asshole I was, she didn't give up on me.

Deanna: I'm so happy that Steven is clean and happy now and that's a miracle. You can never give up on your child. I want people to read the book "Sweet Child of Mine," I think it will inspire people never to give up on their child.

A:

Our students are here 50 hours a week for little pay, the have homework and papers due weekly, if that's not passion I don't know what is.


Q:

Hey Steven! Love ya, man! What's your favorite GnR song to play?

A:

What drove you to start this program?


Q:

Steven: Every single one of them. I still play the ones that I recorded the demo tapes I helped write on "Use Your Illusion". At least 12, 13 of those. I'll still practice to those because I love them so much, but obviously, I play em my way, which is the right way.

Deanna: Steven is the greatest drummer in the world. He is my king. He is the best.

Steven: I'm the biggest asshole you're ever gonna fuckin meet.

[laughter]

Deanna: No son, don't say that.

A:

I got arrested and found a mentor who taught me about perfect practice.

Here's some more color: http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/17/us/cnnheroes-brandon-chrostowski-edwins-cleveland/


Q:

What songs did you play to when starting out as a drummer?

A:

Did you ever felt like giving up and what did you do in such situations?


Q:

Steven: My favorite songs, like I said earlier, were Kiss, Queen. I loved Disco. I loved Jazz. I love 70's Rock. I love 60's Rock. Just music that made me feel good, that I still listen to today and I still practice today. It's so cool. You just go on the Internet and get 70's hits, ya know, a collection of all these different 70's songs. And I went this one, this one this one, and I picked all these different ones, so I got all these great songs I practice to and they're such great songs 'cause they're stories about something that's meaningful. Nowadays, I listen to these bands and for one, you can't understand what they're saying, two it doesn't mean anything. I just like a good story and something that makes my heart feel good. And then 30, 40 years later I listen to it and I still get that euphoria. I love Rock.

A:

No, its been tough at times, but in tight or difficult times its about pushing through and fighting for the cause


Q:

Hi Deanna

Could you tell us when and why you decided to write this book?

Thank you!

A:

As a Frenchman, I wanted to know, what is served in French Restaurants? Since you're fine dining, I can't imagine it being things like Pot au Feu or Potée Bretonne, but except Foie Gras, nothing comes to mind when I think of fine dining which is very French.


Q:

Deanna: I decided to write the book after the time I first saw him perform. I couldn't sleep, I was so wound up, so I just wrote down my thoughts. Eventually every time I would see him, whether it was a good time or a bad time, I would just write down my thoughts on a piece of paper, on an envelope, on a-

Steven: Like a diary!

Deanna: Like a diary! So I never thought about writing a book per say, it just happened.

Steven: Writing things down that go on in your life, it's so helpful to be able to get it out of your head, put it down on paper or talk to someone about it to someone who understands. In my book I talk about when I was 13, I used to hang out at clubs, with grown ups, and drugs. I got taken advantage of, I was drugged and sexually abused by an older teenager and an older guy. I couldn't talk about that for decades but once I talked to someone who understood and I got it out of my head, I can move forward, I have closure. Writing shit down is just closure. My mom doing these diaries was closure so that she could sleep at night. If you don't write, you're just thinking about it, it will drive you crazy and you can never move forward in your life. It's the best thing in the word, just write your crap down. If you have an addict in your life, video tape it. everyone has videos on their phone. Videos don't lie. When an addict sees themselves in denial and actually see the truth, it's an eye opener and a heart breaker.


Q:

Hey Steven, I'm such a big fan of yours!!!

I think you are the best drummer in the world and you are one of my biggest idols!! You are so inspirational to me as you have kept on going, no matter what! You are the type of guy that people will always admire.

I love what you did for Guns N' Roses and the work that you've done since, my question for you is:

What bands and/or artists are you a fan of???

Love from Saffron (17), UK xxx

A:

Where do you see Edwin's in the next 10, 20 years? How do you hope to expand your mission and brand?


Q:

Steven: Hi Saffron, Thank you very much! I appreciates that. My favorite bands and my influential drummers were Roger Taylor from Queen, Peter Criss from Kiss. Pretty much any 60's, 70's drummers because in the 60's is first when they started using Jazz drumming and started turning ti into rock drumming and then the 70s just took it to another level. In the 80s it just went completely out of style until I came around and changed that.

Deanna: Because you are the king!

Steven: It's good to be king.

A:

By having the best culinary school in the country and being a civil rights leader for returning citizens. By also continuing to do what we're doing already. The campus was first, the building for the butcher shop is ready, after that it will be a bakery, cheese shop, etc. We're isolating each one of the skills in the school and teaching in a real world environment. We are affecting every aspect - the culinary aspect and the school aspect. We're also teaching a culinary program in all state prisons. The fact can not be denied that every human being deserves a fair and equal second chance.


Q:

Hi Steven, thank you for doing this! Was there a drummer who inspired you to play while growing up? Did you ever try to emulate that person?

A:

I love the wraparound model of offering training, employment and housing. By investing in the properties that house students or new business ventures, you are also making our communtity a better place. I am really excited to see things unfold. Edwin's is my favorite restaurant in Cleveland...I can't wait for the butcher shop and bakery to open!


Q:

Steven: Piano because Freddie Mercury is God! If I could do anything, I would do anything close to being Freddie Mercury. Even if I had to be gay. In fact, I wish I was gay but I just don't have it in me!

A:

Thanks, appreciate the support!


Q:

I had lunch in a restaurant with a similar MO in Charlotte, probably about 8 years ago, and loved it.

Do you keep in touch with similar businesses, e.g. To discuss business strategies and experiences, or collaborate in any other way such as marketing?

A:

Good q. We try to reach out to other players in this space but pretty buried in what we have going on. Please send me info about the restaurant in Charlotte as I would love to check out.


Q:

I've been diagnosed with Antisocial Personality Disorder and have a PCL-R score of 33/40. Meaning I'm a psychopath.

A lot of people like me end up going through the prison system, would you/have you hired someone like me (knowingly)? If so then what pros/cons do you think there would be/have you noticed?

A:

Yes, you could be part of our program. We have a tough first 3 weeks to see if you can handle the intensity of the the industry. We have come across many people with different issues and we make sure there is a strong network to support all of them. Your honesty about the situation can make it better and easier, if you are willing to understand the issues you face we will be there to help you through them.


Q:

your most memorable worker(s)?

A:

Kelvin Bailey, from where he started to where he is now.

You can see a little more about him on life after edwins here http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/17/us/cnnheroes-brandon-chrostowski-edwins-cleveland/


Q:

Live in Cleveland and shared your story on Facebook a few weeks ago when it made the front page. I could only hope to have an impact like you in the community. Do you guys have volunteer opportunities?

A:

Thanks for the kind words! We depend on volunteers for lots of things - you can reach out to our volunteer coordinator, Marie, at volunteer (at) edwinsrestaurant.org who can share more.


Q:

How long does it usually take for one of your workers to do a complete turn around? From being a convict to a total success?

Do a lot of them come in with a "me against the world" attitude or do they come in knowing it's time to turn things around

A:

I think the better question is how long does it take a human being to achieve their goals? We've all made past mistakes, so we're always striving to be better, we're always striving to improve as individuals.

I do think that someone who's done a long stretch, it takes at least a good six months to become more human because a length of time in prison affects someone's self-esteem and morale.


Q:

Is the business model viable? Could someone do the same thing without the 501 status?

A:

Yes and No, you would have to cut out a lot of the extras such as housing, case management and other perks our students have. If you work had enough its possible.


Q:

I have worked with former inmates in the past and I know it can be difficult adjusting to life in the real world after their release from prison.

Could you tell me about some of the support services that you provide members of your program with outside of your restaurant?

A:

You're right, its a big transition. We offer whatever someone needs to accomplish their goal. If we don't have it in house we go to our strong network of supporters, diners, etc., most of whom are highly rated int their field of work. We have a case manager that helps with any social needs, connects them with child care, social services, etc. We also have attorney that helps with legal woes (driver's license reinstatement, child support, custody battles, etc.). We also offer a family class to build stronger families. We have a handwriting analysis expert who has become more of a counselor. We also offer housing for students and alumni. On top of that we have a staff that cares about each student as if they were a member of the family.


Q:

Brandon, I think this is awesome. This is the only way we're going to help people turn their lives around. We can't throw them in a cage for 5 or 10 or 12 years, then turn them loose and expect them to succeed in a world that left them behind.

I love what amount to grassroots efforts like this. Rachel's House in Columbus does some of the same support stuff it sounds like you're doing, aimed at women returning to society after drug and prostitution offenses.

Can you talk a little more about the beginnings of your work, or point us to more writings? What kind of support or pushback did you get from the Parole Authority in the beginning? Was there a lot of doubt on their end? How difficult was it to get into the prisons for classes?

And a last q, if you want: care to comment on the ODRC decision to get rid of the system's farmland and that decisions's effects on diets and such?

A:

Here's a link to a few of my recent op-eds: http://www.clevescene.com/scene-and-heard/archives/2016/06/02/op-ed-heeding-the-humanity-of-former-prisoners http://www.cleveland.com/opinion/index.ssf/2014/07/prison_gave_me_a_recipe_for_fr.html

We didn't get any push back, we got support. Parole officers don't want to see people fail. They want solutions for success. We also had zero resistance from prisons for our classes. Re: the ODRC decision, its unfortunate but I understand there is a cost associated with that. I thought it was great opportunity for them to learn valuable skills and where food comes from.


Q:

having 2 felons in my family I certainly would say thank you for what you do, its certainly hard for them to find gainful employment at this point. I have had the idea of doing something similar but with something similar to a thrift store or habitat for humanity type store, what advice would you give me?

A:

in spirit, don't stop working towards your goal. Don't EVER stop. After that, six things: one, write business plan; get it out of your head and make it vulnerable.

Two, incorporate. Take up space in our world.

Three, get your team together.

Four, develop a brand.

Five, start doing it.

And, six, and now you're ready to start raising capital.


Q:

You mentioned the 3 week boot camp a lot...I'm curious, what does that entail?

A:

Gastronomy, Culinary Math, ServSafe, Menu Knowledge, and a number of other things all very intense training.


Q:

Do your employees ever suggest recipes and if so, what was the weirdest recipe and what was the best recipe?

A:

Yes, they do. The weirdest was bleu cheese ice cream. They come up with recipes for our specials all the time, so come in for dinner to try the best ones.


Q:

Yo who's the biggest Cleveland celeb you guys have served?

I'm originally from Cleveland and I'm really excited to see people like you helping to revitalize the community. Keep up the great work!

A:

For food Michael Symon Michael Rhulman

Politics Senators Sherrod Brown

entertainment Al Roker (cleveland native)

Sports: Joe Jurevicius


Q:

Are you aware if any of the employees did time together?

Do they talk about prison at all during casual conversation? More specificallly, have you ever heard "prison rules!", jokingly or not?

And just from your viewpoint, what's the ratio of ethnicities in your employees?

A:

Yeah, there have been people who did some time together.

To your second question, not really, but you do hear students recall some moments, particularly as it relates to cooking techniques inside.

In an average class, it's 90% African American and 10% white, and there are certainly more men than women.


Q:

Were you ever afraid to fire anyone?

A:

No. There are certain issues that we have 0 tolerance for and are easy calls to make. The other times we have to let someone go are because of effort and we give many opportunities to succeed so it is an easy call to make. No fear when being fair and doing the right thing.


Q:

Oh shit, I live right down the road from this! Anyway, my question is this: Do you have problems promoting the business sometimes? I would expect a restaurant run by reformed convicts wouldn't have the most popular ad campaign...


Q:

How much extra does your insurance cost?

A:

No extra cost. At the beginning there was a bit of difficulty finding insurance, but the rate is the same as a typical restaurant. The greater difficulty was more about finding the travelers insurance ( coverage for visits to prison). Liquor and all that wasn't too difficult.


Q:

Hi Brandon! I work at a nonprofit in Nashville that helps formerly incarcerated people find employment so I love what you're doing. Employment and job training is absolutely the biggest factor in reducing recidivism. Also, a big fan of the wrap-around services you offer. Have you had any trouble with finding interested employees or with retention? And have you had any trouble with community support and fund development?

A:

We have close to 100 restaurant in the city who have hired our students, and a list of about 40 who are waiting for students to graduate. We are trying to make the community better and they are behind us fully!


Q:

Hi Brandon, I just want to say that as someone who lives 5-10 minutes away from your place, it's been a real pleasure. My parents brought me up there last fall, and I really didn't know what to expect. However, I was absolutely blown away by the service and hospitality. My question is, what is the most memorable instance of a former worker leaving to do something else?

A:

To many to mention, I do love when a student comes back to talk about his experiences somewhere else though


Q:

It's my understanding that many kitchens develop quirks or rituals that become a part of the kitchen's culture. Have any of these kinds of peculiarities emerged in the kitchen at EDWINS?

A:

Long running joke, our director of culinary arts, Gerry Grim, been with us from the start. Any word, say like Cherry or Blueberry becomes Gerryies or bluegerries


Q:

I work with inmates working in Correctional Industries. We also run a cafe, staffed by female inmates, which is open to the public.

Do you find a good deal of your business is for the novelty factor?

We get a ton of people that drop by because getting served by inmates is a weird and strange experience. It's amazing how often people say, "Oh, they're just like normal people."

Thank you for the work you do, I sincerely believe giving someone a purpose and a chance is the best way to keep recidivism rates down and make a real change in someone's life.

A:

No, we do not, we are charging $34 for a french hamburger, the novelty wears off if the quality isn't there.


Q:

Are there any aspects of your training programme that are different to other restaurants' training programmes which are designed to educate your workers on the cons of reoffending/show them the pros of employment?

A:

We are more aggressive, each student works every position in the restaurant. To the second part of your question, there are no lessons on why not to re-offend the trick is to provide more powerful yes. If we can keep a student more focused on accomplishing their goals the temptation to return to there old way becomes a less powerful yes.


Q:

Im assuming the customers know the fame around the restaurant. But do you ever still get a shitty customer?

A:

A majority do know about what we do but many still do not. This restaurant is no different than others and we still get our share of the shit. I will tell you that we are not a cheap restaurant and if we do not deliver then we reap what we sow!


Q:

My fiancée and I are going to EDWINS for valentines day this year. Any suggestions?

A:

Oysters, Paupiette, Venison, Chocolate Pyramid!


Q:

Would ever branch out?

A:

We want to build deeper not wider, that why we have done the butcher shop and campus, we want to expand on our neighborhood and where we are. We have 166 graduates, they are our expansion.

http://www.clevescene.com/scene-and-heard/archives/2017/01/09/edwins-to-open-butcher-shop-in-buckeye-neighborhood-in-mission-to-better-lives-of-many

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2015/09/edwins_second_chance_campus_co.html