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Politics-LiveMy name is Caleb Q. Dyer and I am a NH State Representative who just became the second Libertarian state legislator in the United States. AMA!

Feb 10th 2017 by cqdyer • 23 Questions • 1557 Points

My short bio: I am a NH native, a redditor, and a representative to the NH General Court. I was elected as a Republican but switched to the Libertarian Party out of frustration with some of the policy priorities of the Republican majority.

My Proof: http://imgur.com/a/b1THc https://www.facebook.com/repcqdyer/

Q:

What are your thoughts about the 9th Circut Court's decision handed down a few minutes ago regarding the President's travel ban?

A:

I think the travel ban is ridiculous. I find it interesting that travel bans of a similar nature have previously been unchallenged by the courts.


Q:

Do you believe that other members of the house will specifically seek you out to cosponsor their bills which libertarians agree with to show that a bill has multi-party support?

A:

This will likely be the case. I do not plan to just go around co-sponsoring bills willy-nilly. I plan to do the same as I have this year next year; picking just a handful of bill ideas and making sure they are submitted to the legislature.


Q:

As a democratic leaning NH resident why should I vote for you?

My wife would like to know your opinion on Edelbut.

A:

I am a firm opponent of Republicans on a great many social issues. I support the decriminalization of sex work with Rep. Elizabeth Edwards (D-Manchester). I am a co-sponsor on HB656, the primary bill for the legalization of recreational cannabis. I am also fervently against the death penalty.

As far as Frank is concerned, I supported his candidacy for Governor because I found him to be a very honorable, truthful man. I didn't agree with some of his policy (namely that he was very pro-life) but I could respect him for being a genuine person.


Q:

Could you elaborate on the policy priorities of the state Republicans that caused you to switch?

Kudos for following your conscience.

A:

Republicans in New Hampshire do not seem very focused on reducing expenditures but rather focused on finding ways spend a surplus that we realistically don't have. Apart from this I also question the Republican party's commitment to the accountability of executive agents including police. Also I part ways with many Republicans in that I heartily oppose the death penalty.


Q:

Rep Dyer, assuming HB384 is adopted, will you be requesting inclusion on the proposed Committee to Study Ballot Access?

A:

I will speak with Rep. Pearson soon. I will most certainly request a seat on this study committee. However, who the Speaker appoints is out of my control.


Q:

Are you aware of the typo in the description on your Facebook page?

A:

Well now I am :P


Q:

It's gonna bother you until your social media guys fix it, isn't it?

Also, I'm a law student. Any jobs I can apply to with you?

A:

I make $100/year in the New Hampshire legislature. I'm not really in any position to be hiring staff.


Q:

I grew up in NH and found out that salary when I was 14. Still like to bring it up in conversation to shock people.

Actually on that note how the heck does anyone have time to be in the NH legislation and work? Or is everyone just independently wealthy?

A:

No, I have to work a normal job. Some of us just do our very best to make the time to do the job.


Q:

Are you planning to seek higher office?

A:

No, I do not have any plans to seek higher offices. I have decided that I would never run for a federal office but have not necessarily ruled out higher state offices.


Q:

Do you think this will significantly hurt your chances of being re-elected?

A:

Perhaps. I'm not too concerned. I'm here to work. When I've done the work I will leave it to the voters to decide if it is representative of their interests. I would hope that they can vote for someone for a better reason than just their party label.


Q:

It's awesome to see a State politician moving to the libertarian side!

Now I read further down in a response to another question that you feel taxation is theft. Is there any form of taxation that you would approve of?

If not how would you suggest that we fund departments like the NH DOT, Fire Departments and The local/state Police?

A:

While I do believe that taxation is theft I realize that the system of taxation will not magically cease to exist. Therefore I will be focusing more on more prudent, efficient uses of those tax dollars and refunding them whenever possible. I have no problem with the state having a budget I just want to make sure we are not constantly growing that budget.


Q:

I am of the belief that the country's duty is to take care of our most vulnerable citizens. In what way do you believe libertarianism provides a stable social safety net for those at the bottom of the economic food chain?

A:

"Libertarianism" provides nothing. People provide things, and they usually provide them better and cheaper in a free market.


Q:

Caleb, why switch to the Libertarian Party instead of the Democrats or some other party?

A:

I see you Rodger ;)


Q:

Tax , of course, is being abused but it's also helping vulnerable people - you're going pretty right wing aren't you?

A:

I think you'd find that I'm only fiscally conservative. I am very socially liberal. Many on the left won't even take as extreme positions as I do with regards to social liberties.


Q:

Will you be submitting legislation to abolish personal income, corporate income, sales taxes, or registration fees in your state?

A:

We have no income or sales tax in New Hampshire. I recently introduced a bill on behalf of Eric Schleien (R-Hudson) to reduce the BET/BPT which together constitute the business tax in the state. I do not plan to file any bill to abolish any of these taxes as it would never receive enough votes to pass. I do not like to waste my work time.


Q:

Have you received any negative messages from republicans in the general court?

A:

Not yet. I'm sure I'll get some eventually.


Q:

[deleted]

A:

I do not know Pat Soutter. I have been to the Quill a few times.


Q:

How do you propose to decrease cost of living in this country? What do you think we should do to help the homeless and those living in poverty?

A:

You know I'd really love to bring up to the Speaker of the House resurrecting the policy of allowing the homeless in Concord to sleep in the State House over night. It's a public building after all. If we have the problem of homelessness we should be using every last resource we have to combat it including opening up public buildings.


Q:

If someone doesn't have health insurance and can not afford to pay then gets sick, should we let them die in the street? If not who should pay for them?

A:

While I normally wouldn't answer such a loaded question I'll entertain this one. I do not believe people would have a hard time affording medical procedures or insurance policies if there was not so much market distortion by government at all levels. We should not be letting people "die in the street" but I fail to see how government intervention or even monopolization of the healthcare market would solve the problem of people dying in the street. If anything we have many examples where heavy government intervention or monopolization has led to more people dying in the streets because of shortages of medical professionals and increased wait times for procedures. As for who should pay for someone who cannot afford their treatment: anyone who is willing. I think you underestimate the good things people can do when left to figure out their own solutions. We're doing a lot of this in New Hampshire.


Q:

How on earth can you call that a loaded question? It's a question! Should we help vulnerable people or not? From your answer it appears to be the voluntary charity of the rich? Come on man...

A:

We should help the poor and destitute, voluntarily.


Q:

Do you expect to have a better relationship with Democrats regarding some issues, now that you are not a Republican?

A:

Actually I do expect to have a slightly better relationship with some Democrats. Just today I went to a luncheon put on by Planned Parenthood and the ACLU where the majority of the representatives in attendance were Democrats. They were happy to see people looking to hear a different perspective on some issues.


Q:

Do you see the Libertarian party growing a lot in the near future?

I feel a lot of voters, both Democrat and Republican, feel very disenfranchised, and historically, that seems to be good for smaller parties to grow.

A:

I absolutely see the Libertarians on the rise. You are absolutely correct that there are many disenfranchised voters out there that we are hoping to expose to the ideas of limited government and maximum natural liberty.


Q:

Were you a straight A student? How did you start off on your path to become a legislator and what were some major points?

A:

I was not a straight A student. I was actually very unhappy in public school. I am grateful that I had several very good teachers over the years who encouraged me to learn about things I was interested in. Despite less than stellar performance I was still often recommended to take AP and honors classes because I was genuinely inquisitive and productive student. My path to becoming a legislator actually had a lot to do with my dissatisfaction with public education and figuring out how the market could provide better, cheap alternatives.