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Request[AMA Request] Lord Buckethead, the Independent candidate who ran against Theresa May in the UK general election.

Jun 9th 2017 by ColaMonkey36 • 25 Questions • 123 Points

Hi Reddit, I’m excited to be hosting my first AMA live from E3 2017.

I’ve been working in video games for the last 31 years, and I’ve been lucky enough to work with some of the most talented people in the industry. Not only are video games the fastest growing form of entertainment, they’re beloved by communities of players around the world and we believe that they can enrich peoples’ lives.

Beyond games I’m passionate about new technology, new methods of managing creative talent and new types of transportation… and chocolate!

Yesterday we held our annual E3 conference where we announced what I think is one of our strongest lineups of games in recent years. If you haven’t seen it yet, I won’t spoil it for you, watch it here >> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Q1s3lOzQ1A

Edit 1 - I'll start answering questions at 10:30am PT keep them coming!

Edit 2 - Thanks so much for your questions, I really enjoyed hearing from you all, unfortunately that is all the time I have for today. I hope we can do this again soon!

Proof 1

Proof 2

Q:

this is a request only, not actually lord buckethead himself

A:

Did playing a man so badly bullied by his co-workers have an effect on you IRL?

Also, your dog is awesome.


Q:

[deleted]

A:

When are you upgrading to RGB sandals?


Q:

How do you stay satisfied going over basic material year after year after exploring it in such depth in college?

A:

What does Ticketmaster do with all the pain they harvest from the souls they rip off at the box office?


Q:

How did you choose the kids that were on the show? I was always so jealous of those kids, man.

A:

Whats the deal with the rainbow six siege servers man?


Q:

Or am I...?

No.

A:

Yes. My dog is AWESOME!!! ;) As far as being bullied on the show having an effect on my real life I would say no. The bullying was only on camera. The minute the director yelled cut I was definitely one of the "in crowd". lol


Q:

The most unexpected thing is that we are somehow conditioned to think of North Korea as very simple. As in people are hungry & poor & brianwashed. Then rich are like Kim Jong Un & his friends all partying and eating & drinking. Not true. My students were the sons of elite, the creme de la creme of North Korea, but they were under the most strict control every second of the day. They had not been anywhere, outside their country certainly but also within their country, and they didn't know anything, their education thus far seemed to have been totally bogus and built only around the Great Leader. They had no freedom of any kind. Sure, they were of course better off than the rest of the country that suffers, famine-striken etc., but the elites also live under fear. What I am trying to say is that it's not black and white. The control / abuse happens on all level. Basically they are all victims. The entire country is a ladder / web of abuse and control.

A:

It's a matter of time. We've actually reached out to the brand that makes the sandals I wear about doing an LTT edition sandal. They got back to us saying it "didn't align with their brand values" or something to that effect.

I was like "WHAT?? The ONLY person on EARTH who proudly rocks your dad sandals as a keystone of his image and supporting that is not part of your brand values?? What ARE your brand values??"


Q:

One of the most satisfying aspects of my job is continuously learning new things and new ways of presenting even the most basic material. People don't realize how much room there is for creativity in teaching math at all levels. The curriculum that I teach is quite broad and includes topics such as logic, geometry, combinatorics, and other areas of math. One of my favorite things to do is to take an "advanced" math topic and to come up with ways to give glimpses of it to young children.

I will give you an example. The triangle inequality is something that isn't typically covered in most math classes until high school geometry. I created an activity for 2nd and 3rd graders, in which they were able to not only explore but actually discover this "theorem" for themselves by playing with sticks of many different lengths and seeing which combinations of them can make a triangle and which ones cannot.

A:

So funny story- there's this machine we kept in the back, right, called the Hate Engine. We have these siphons right underneath the desk that suck up all the complaints to add to the Hate Engine, and the Engine converts that hate into more money, which is why they keep adding service fees. More fees = more money = more hate = more more money.

Seriously though, nobody paid me to be a fan of Ticketmaster's practices. This whole ticket monopoly situation is kind of fucked right now. Best lesson I learned at the job was to always buy from the venue directly when I can.


Q:

That was a fun part of the gig, doing the casting. Back then most kid talent in Seattle did modeling or print ads and couldn't really walk and talk on camera. We scoured local school theater programs, talent agencies, friends, relatives, friends of friends....It wasn't past me to dress up my baby as yoda (use the forks Luke for the Structures show) ( http://imgur.com/us2fxSj ) when needed. (EG)

A:

Bonjour… I am very much aware of the issue and it’s a personal priority for me. Whenever the servers go down, I know within about a minute. I am working with many different teams to solve those problems as I know that this is as important to your enjoyment of the game as the gameplay itself. We are already rolling out fixes like Operation Health that is all about improving the core infrastructure and we hope that this is a step in the right direction.


Q:

I love that we eventually find out that he has a beautiful family and has achieved awesome life goals !

A:

How did they feel about learning English? Resentful? Enthusiastic? Indifferent?


Q:

When & how did dropping products become a habit?

A:

What you are doing is inspiring.

One of the reasons I liked organic chemistry so much is because to me, it could be simplified into simple puzzles. I had imagined teaching them to my children when I one day had a family. I forgot about this until I read this.


Q:

Best lesson I learned at the job was to always buy from the venue directly when I can.

One time I had decided to attend a comedy show st the last minute. Bought tickets at the venue, a couple of hours before the show started. Still had Ticketmaster fees.

A:

What do you two think of Bill Nye Saves The World?


Q:

Any word on a splinter cell game in the works. What can we expect ?

A:

When the writers realized that Jerry was going to be the office punching bag they also realized that they had to give him some reason not to blow his head off. lol They decided that ultimately Jerry would have the best life of any one of the characters. Jerry's wife and kids adored him and thought he did no wrong. Don't forget...they also gave him a huge penis. I like when real life and TV life come together. ;)


Q:

They had no choice. This was what they were ordered to do, and they studied so diligently because they were obedient. It is a culture where they have to listen to the authorities. But little by little, they would show some frustrations. They found it hard. Their dictionaries were outdated, which translated Korean words to English, and they didn't like to use English dictionaries for definition. They found different accents by the teachers (many were missionaries from deep South, with the Southern accent, or from New Zealand etc) difficult to understand. But these were just practical difficulties. Their real feelings about having to learn them? They couldn't really show it. They just felt worried that they were spending all their time learning English when their majors were within the field of science and technology

A:

Being in a huge hurry to blitz through booths and see all the coolest stuff then run off to the next one (our first year at CES we did over 50 videos with 3.5 people)

We had no time to do B roll a lot of the time so I would have to manhandle the product to show what I was talking about.

These days it's just part of the fun of doing shows. I love tech and if this "dropping stuff" persona lets me argue to a brand they should let me get up close and personal then I'll keep playing it up!

I'm not actually (usually) that clumsy. Just in a hurry :P


Q:

Thanks. It's always great to hear when someone finds what I'm doing useful and inspiring. I am glad to have triggered this connection.

A:

Makes sense, not all venues work the same way. Can't really speak for the ones I didn't work at.


Q:

We actually haven't yet seen it. I (EG) just saw the documentary Bill Nye: Science Guy and loved it. I laughed, I cried.

A:

Hi! Splinter Cell is a brand we talk about a lot. It's also personally one of my favorite series. We don't have anything specific to share at the moment but teams are working on different things, so stay tuned for more.


Q:

Also was great that when he was at home he was super witty, had great reflexes etc. Honestly I've always considered that to be a master stroke of the show.

A:

What wildly held belief among your students surprised you the most?


Q:

Who's the 0.5 of a person?

A:

Do you scream "It's DOCTOR Fradkin, NOT Miss Fradkin" and then throw an eraser at the offending child?


Q:

My mom goes to a ticketmaster kiosk at Walmart. Never checked it out for myself. There still fees through the kiosk?

A:

We actually haven't yet seen it.

Then it's not too late for you then... I still remember the days back when I still had a faint light of innocence shining in my heart. Bill Nye Saves The World took that from me... he took it from all of us...


Q:

Is there a decision as a CEO that you regret or wish you could've done better?

A:

I completely agree. The episode where Jerry retires and Leslie comes over to talk with him because she felt like they didn't give him a good farewell was one of my favorites. Leslie sees how Jerry is adored by h is family. She also sees that he's awesome around his house. He's funny, smart, quick reflexes. Leslie acts likes she's been thrown to some other dimension. The writers on Parks always knew how to handle each situation. I thought it was a brilliant idea. :)


Q:

There were so many things. They just learn totally upside down information about most things. But one thing I think most people do not realize is that they learn that South Korea & US attacked North Korea in 1950, and that North Korea won the war due to the bravery of their Great Leader Kim Il Sung. So they celebrate Victory Day, which is a huge holiday there. So this complete lie about the past then makes everything quite illogical. Because how do you then explain the fact that Korea is divided still, if actually North Korea "won" the war? One would have to question that strange logic, which they do not. So it's not so much that they get taught lies as education, but that that second step of questioning what does not make sense, in general, does not happen, not because they are stupid but because they are forbidden and also their intelligence is destroyed at young age. There were many many examples of such.

A:

One of Luke's friends who wanted to meet folks in the industry and agreed to help us carry our tripods and stuff in exchange for tagging along


Q:

In our school we actually go by first names and they call me Miss Sasha.

A:

I'd imagine so, yeah. When we sold for other venues we had to charge the full TM fee set.


Q:

Yeah, we understand it didn't go so well.

 

I've been a lurker on Reddit for years, saw the negative comments and it broke my heart. I was concerned it might impact the original series and I'd hate to see the show removed from the curriculum of some school districts because it is still such an effective teaching tool.(jm)

A:

Thanks for the question. I would say we were very strongly investing in MMOs in the late 90's/early 2000s and we stopped that side of the business because it wasn't performing well enough and we should have continued on with that.


Q:

Why else do they bully him? They're jealous

A:

What kind of measures did you have to go through to make sure your notes or any other evidence of your actual work would never be discovered?


Q:

Hi Linus, what was Intel’s response to your video on the i9 and the X299 platform, seeing as you just had a sponsored video with them?

A:

Thank you for what you do. I tutored math for college kids and found so many people who had been traumatized to hate math when they were young.

I remember one student in particular, Beth. Beth was planning to become an elementary teacher. That's very common for strongly mathphobic students like her. An elementary ed student has to take one, single basic math course, and that's all she wanted. She came to me every week to watch and coach her through homework.

At the end of the semester, she got a decent grade (an A or B), and I thought I'd never see her again.

But she turned up once in the next semester, not because she was having trouble in math, but because she'd missed a lecture and wanted to be very sure it was as easy as the book made it sound. I was startled to find she was taking another math course. Calculus even! What's a math avoider doing in Calculus?

It turned out, that my own love for math had caught on. She'd been exposed to a culture of math achievement and independence. I wouldn't hand her homework answers, but instead helped her find them.

That changed Beth's life.
She changed her major to mathematics.
Because of me, Beth changed the whole direction of her life.

Just telling the story brings tears to my eyes.


Q:

Also, check the websites of your local free Alt-Newsweeklies and magazines (the free ones that have local stories and culture, like The Village Voice) they almost all have deals with all of the local venues (it's how they survive) and you can get fee-free tickets!

A:

I wouldn't worry about that too much. It may have hurt Bill's reputation a bit, but the original series will stand for a long time as a standard for getting kids excited about science. You guys did an amazing job.


Q:

Are you the Grand Master of the Templar Order?

A:

Many people have told me that they work without someone who is basically the office punching bag. I seems that every office needs that person to take the fall for everything. Unfortunately for Jerry it was his burden to take on. That being said...I do believe that Jerry truly loved all of his co-workers and knew that deep down they all had his back. As much as family was most important to Jerry he also adored all the people he worked with. Even when they weren't being especially kind.


Q:

I kept them all on USB sticks which I kept on my body at all times. I erased the trace off my computer every single time I signed off. I also created a document within a document so that my notes looked like a school material. I also created a back up copy on SD card which I hid in secret places in the dark, with the light off, just in case there were camera in the room.

A:

I've actually exchanged emails with them already and I have a call with some folks over there sometime this week to discuss my concerns. There was a lot of concern from members of our community that our criticism of Intel would negatively affect our relationship with them or our business moving forward..

But I think that's not giving Intel enough credit. They are big girls and boys and can absolutely take the constructive criticism with the praise.

And in response to the folks who didn't understand why our workstations are using Intel after that video.. Even if I don't agree with their strategy, I respect that they build world class technology and I'm not going to stop recommending their products just because we're having a bit of a spat at the moment.


Q:

That is a wonderful story; thanks for sharing it. My coauthor actually grew up hating math because she found it formulaic and uncreative. Then she took a number theory course her freshman year of college, and was completely converted. Now she is a Computer Science professor at Columbia. I wrote a blog post about her story here: https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/from-math-hater-to-mathematician-and-computer-scientist-the-story-of-allison-bishop/

A:

He was checking out the Village Voice, seeing who was playing where

Pulled his head up out the paper, pushing out a single tear

Five words like a beacon of light in the mist

Ministry Live At The Ritz


Q:

Thank you so much, that means a lot. (jm and eg)

A:

I believe in free will...


Q:

I always figured it was because of his time share in Muncey.

A:

Hi Suki! I read your book this spring - thank you for writing your experiences; truly enlightening, and also, empathy-invoking. Would you ever go back to DPRK? Do you think you'd be allowed to? Any plans for more books?


Q:

How is the adpocalypse affecting you and the broader tech YouTube community?

A:

Presumably you have done a fair amount of teaching at the university level, but now you're doing curriculum development for K-5. My question is: At the university level, did you ever see common misconceptions or prevalent comprehension difficulties that you believe were rooted in educational problems that started as early as K-5? If so, what were they, and how are you addressing this in your curriculum?


Q:

What "insider tips" do you have to get good tickets? Can I bribe a Ticketmaster employee for good seats?? :-)

A:

Were there episode ideas that were refused by Disney because of content matter or the company did not think it would be suitable for their general audience?


Q:

Do you enjoy games other than the ones made by Ubisoft?

A:

Yes. A time share in Muncie can certainly sway a girls head. But Jerry's other "head" is what probably turned her head. lol


Q:

Hi, for now at least, I would not be allowed to go back, but more than that, even if I were allowed, which I could be in the future, I would probably not go because it would be too dangerous (in a different way than when I was there undercover for the book) and also because I would not feel that I would learn anything new, unless it could be under a different setting, which would be nearly impossible to find for the moment. And yes, there are more books at work:) Thanks for reading.

A:

Since our videos are advertiser friendly, it hasn't hit us too hard directly.. but it was part of what prompted us to build Floatplane Club so that we and other creators would have ways to make money in the event that our adsense revenue got ripped away.. so it's definitely costing us money, but only because we're re-investing what we're making.


Q:

In terms of my teaching, there was a big selection bias as they were Princeton math and science majors. However, I have met many adults, including highly successful ones, who've had math anxiety and lack of understanding of fundamental things in math.

One common misconception is that math is about memorizing facts and procedures and there is no creativity to it. Another one is that there is nothing more to math than just arithmetic.

In my curriculum, I show children that math is about looking for patterns, generalizing and problem solving. I also make sure to include many topics such as logic, geometry, and probability. Here are just a few examples of lessons with exploration in non-arithmetic topics: https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/2017/04/25/logical-fun-part-i/ https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/2017/04/07/playing-with-symmetry-in-kindergarten/ https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/2017/03/22/fibonacci-trees/

A:

It doesn't really work that way anymore, unfortunately, at least according to my experience. A lot of it's the usual "get in early and get lucky".

With casino tickets specifically, though, there is the VIP angle to consider. Good casinos reward their players really well, and for us in particular we had presales a day before public sales just for our players. Also, depending on circumstances we'd sometimes get tickets back from our VIP folks for sale if they just weren't doing the numbers they expected, which would lead to some last minute openings- usually in the primo seats too, just because the VIPs get the good stuff to keep them coming back.


Q:

Actually Disney totally left us alone, we did what we wanted. We got one note from Michael Eisner that said "love the show, could use more history" (EG)

A:

I travel a lot for work, but thanks to the Switch I’ve been able to play Zelda. It’s a great game and we can learn a lot about how we make games by looking at what Nintendo has done.

For Ubisoft games, Rayman will always have a place in my heart because of its importance in Ubisoft’s history and because I played it a lot with my kids. I’m still playing From Dust, and I’m excited about all the different motor vehicles you can play with in The Crew 2.


Q:

He also has the largest penis that doctor had ever seen.

A:

Were you ever in a situation where you had to act against your morals/beliefs to maintain your cover?


Q:

Linus, did the "walking in the rain" video have the effect you wanted? Just curious as it's quite out of character from the rest of your content.

A:

Thanks for your AMA, and for saying a number of very sensible things! I have an MS in Math, and I'm about to start my 19th year teaching math in [primarily] public high schools. I usually perk up when people start talking about curricula!

Are you[r students] under the same Common Core mandates as those at a public school? What I'm REALLY asking is whether your curriculum could be successfully applied under the constraints of a public school classroom?

I can't speak for all secondary math teachers everywhere, but my colleagues would LOVE to be able to teach students to love and see math how we love and see math. However, we feel boxed in by outside constraints.


Q:

The best deal I ever got on a ticket was actually not long ago. A few months actually, for an event happening next week. Ticketmaster ran an "official exchange" program (stubhub essentially) for the event since all the wristbands are registered to names and a lot of people got screwed over by other sites since they were relying on the original purchaser to send them the ticket once they got it.

Anyways, someone fucked up... Hard. The seller accidentally fat fingered​ the price and typed 55.55$ instead of 555.50$ (facevalue was 800$). The seller was supposed to have a 24hr period that he could change the pricing, but I bought the ticket before that could happen. I was so shocked by my luck I even called Ticketmaster to make sure it wasn't fake and was told that I was good to go and all tickets are garunteed.

Fast forward to the next day. I receive a call from Ticketmaster and they asked me to give the ticket back. I honestly was a bit pissed at this point because I and already been told that I was good to go and they'd handle the situation. I asked the guy why they suddenly changed their minds and he explained everything I said in the first paragraph. My response was that it seemed like they owed that man a ticket but mine was already garunteed and I didn't see how this was my problem since in multiple places on their website it said it was garunteed and that all purchases were final. I know this because I read everything I could about it the previous night. After telling him this he said he'd talk to his manager and figure it out.

Gotta call 4 hours later saying I could keep the ticket and that they'd be giving that guy a ticket back as well... I felt like an asshole but fuck Ticketmaster even more

A:

You guys seemed to create the genre of E/I television shows at the time. I'm sure budgets were tight. Did you have difficulty getting funding for a series?


Q:

Comment comptez-vous lutter contre Bolloré dans le futur ?

How do you intend to deal with Bolloré/Vivendi (a French industrial group which planned to takeover Ubisoft) ?

Source : https://www.gamespot.com/articles/vivendi-will-reportedly-pursue-a-ubisoft-takeover-/1100-6449572/

A:

True Dat!!!!!! ;)


Q:

The premise of undercover journalism is a difficult one. Because you have to essentially "lie" to keep a cover. That is only used when the traditional methods cannot work, which is the case in some difficult topics such as investigating mafia or dictatorship etc. North Korea is one such place, there, traditional methods can even be collaborating in the regime's lie. So it's one exceptional circumstance where the undercover /embedded method can reveal the truth buried within lies. It was hard to be among the evangelicals however because I had to attend the sunday service (which was kept secret from students) at the dormitory, to keep my evangelical cover. The thing is, you have to set your own parameters of decency and integrity. Within my capability, I tried to remain as truthful as I could. I know it sounds odd to say that, but there is no real rule in this kind of independent investigative journalism where you take all the task / risk of finding sources / pursing it / jumping in there etc all on your own. So for me, I just tried as best as possible to be sincere despite the circumstances. But to be amongst such devout believers of fundamental Christianity, I found it difficult to maintain my pose, but I knew I had to, to be allowed to blend in. But I really struggled with it. It was very hard, I would say.

A:

Yeah Dennis and I were both really pleased with it.


Q:

I'm sure that I have a lot more freedom than public school teachers. That said, certain elements and guiding principles of my curriculum could probably be applied in any classroom setting. I do feel fortunate to have a lot of freedom in what I teach.

It is great that you have a goal of teaching students to love math and I bet that it has a great impact on them.

A:

Hey man, you did nothing wrong there. More power to you.


Q:

YES (both of us)

A:

Freedom and independence are key to what we do – they are what allow us to take risks, try new things, and create games like the ones we showed during E3 this year. We will fight to continue to be able to keep doing that in the future.


Q:

I get the feeling they did this to make it up to the actor for all of the abuse he took. That and his hot wife.

I always wondered how actors with characters like this can compartmentalize the experience of being verbally/psychologically abused. I mean, I know it isn't real but the writers are making fun of their physical representation of the character which is their actual physical appearance IRL.

I am guessing it is easier for adult actors but what about younger ones who are still developing psychologically? For example, Anne from Arrested Development. There were some really cutting comments about her on that show and I have to assume it stung a bit.

A:

Are there any linguistic things/cultural habits that North Koreans do that the rest of us Koreans also do? Like the "aigoo" and the "oh moh moh" when surprised?


Q:

Not sure if you frequent reddit, but there has been huge support and want for a "tech talks with linus" sorta thing where it is just down to earth discussion

A:

Okay, I'll ask the obvious question: Presumably with a PhD from Princeton you had a decent number of opportunities to teach and research at universities. Why did you choose to teach children and develop curriculum for kids in elementary school?


Q:

Interesting! I also worked at a box office at a casino that used Ticketmaster, but we absolutely had control over some of the good seats to an extent. Couldn't be super obvious about it and wouldn't do it on super popular shows. But we held tickets for so many different things - media, community (tribe), artist, giveaways, VIP, business council, etc. with so many good seats on hold, if the community seats weren't selling well it was super easy to just swap out the community holds and get someone tickets in the first 5 rows. We also had the ability to go in and snag tickets before the presale/on sale although that was a huge no no and fire-worthy so people didn't do it very often. I'm also curious if your VIPs were crabs about it haha! I remember so many people feeling so entitled to tix in the first 10 rows, who were not anywhere near our highest level of play. Fun to read your answers though! Thanks for doing this!

A:

Did you think that years after the show was cancelled, kids would still be screaming "BILL BILL BILL BILL" every opportunity they got? That song is like 90s kids national anthem.


Q:

Hi Yves,

what old game would you want to be remastered with today's graphics ?

A:

That's an interesting insight. Yes. When they're making fun of a characters physical attributes they are also making fun of the actors in a way. Personally I've never been bothered by it. I've been a big guy all my life so weight jokes come with the territory. That being said maybe I should get myself some therapy and figure some shit out. lol :)


Q:

Generally it's the same. Yes, the accent is different & they have some phrasings and words that are different or feel quite old fashioned or war-related vocabularies, but in general the difference is almost regional where one has that in South Korea from region to region also, but when you are talking about the basic exclamation you cite, (when bumping into things or surprised) they are pretty much not that different.

A:

duly noted.. It's something we're considering, but we also don't want to force ourselves to create content because it's "popular". There's a fine line between engaging with the community and pandering.

Just trying to stay on the former side of it.


Q:

Here are the few main reasons: 1) I saw as a big area of opportunity. 2) I felt like I could make a bigger difference here than doing research at a university. 3) It is important to me personally because I am raising two daughters. 4) I realized I really enjoy doing it!

A:

Yeah no problem!

We had a bunch of those holds too, definitely. It wasn't at all uncommon to get a handful of holds back here or there, but just as often we would use up all the holds and sell out.


Q:

Never imagined the success of the original show. We talked about the show being relevant for 3-5 years, max. Almost 25 years later, to have so many millennials say they got into science from the series is so amazing to me. And just a shout out to Mike Green, composer of the theme song.-(jm)

A:

I would say Far Cry 3 on the Xbox One X would be amazing :)


Q:

Dammit, I'm only on the 4th season (my own fault).

edit: Dammit Jerry I can't quit, I'm a government employee for a rural city in the North East.

A:

What ESL teaching methods and approaches were favoured by schools in North Korea? Additionally, what kind of resources/texts were available for you to use in the classroom?


Q:

Hey Linus, what's probably the most exciting project that you've done on the channel (LTT)?

A:

Reason 4 is enough by itself. Excellent work forging your own path and making a difference your way. Especially being able to balance enjoying work and feeling purpose in it. I bet you'll change some lives in ways you'll never fully see! Good work miss Sasha. Er, I mean, doctor Fradkin.


Q:

How could you recognize professional ticket scalpers? Did they ever try to bribe you?

A:

What are some funny bloopers or accidents that occurred while filming the show with Bill Nye?


Q:

How does one become a CEO? What was your early life like?

A:

Dammit!!!!! Quit your day job and start binging. No excuses!!!!!! ;) lol


Q:

Only those texts allowed in China. All that was pre-approved by the North Korean authority. I tried to install my own methods of essay writing and letter writing to investigate what they are really thinking, but that was not a part of the official text, but I insisted and got them approved by the North Korean authority called "counterpart".

A:

7 Gamers 1 CPU was one of the most exciting projects I've done. I'll always remember the moment it worked as one of the highlights of my career.

That's really where I get off - spending a TON of time on something, not being sure that it's going to work, and then seeing the end result be awesome.

Scrapyard Wars Season 1 will also hold a special place in my heart forever. That was where we began experimenting with the idea of being a "Tech Top Gear" rather than just a review channel and that path we took continues to shape our content (even our reviews which contain more personalities and funny stuff and more little sketches than ever) to this day.


Q:

Thank you for the kind words. I feel very fortunate for having the opportunity.

A:

A lot of times we didn't really care- once the ticket's been sold we have no way to police what you do with it (and honestly probably shouldn't, there's very little fundamental difference between giving a ticket to a friend and selling it on the internet beyond the exchange of money).

Back when we were able to do outside sales for other venues we'd get a guy coming in every once in awhile around 10am PST, right when shows went on sale. Dude's name was Dave, he scalped and knew TM back to front (he showed me where to find the macro commands and whatnot). Nice guy, we knew what he was doing but as far as our "jurisdiction" went he was a guest buying tickets. We didn't really have the ability to deny him tickets or anything like that.

There's significantly less power to combat scalping at the cashier's end than people seem to think there is. We're not paid to guess what you're going to do with your tickets, we're here to sell you tickets.


Q:

There were a few moments of pure terror that I remember. For the rivers show, we watched as Bill paddled right into some hole in the current and disappeared. He was gone for about 18 seconds and I remember the panic. The safety boat was already below him! Suddenly he popped up and just continued on as if nothing happened.

Another time, for the Forest show, we got lost in the middle of a monster forest fire. Well, we had to shoot something, so Bill jumped out of the van and we started rolling. A huge fir tree exploded into flames right over our heads and started raining a shower of fire. I turned to Jen, our PA and asked her to back the van up and I still can see the pure terror in her eyes. We lived...(JM)

Bill was invited to fly with the Blue Angels. They warned us that the guest usually passes out from the g forces. We decided that Bill should focus on trying to say simple words like "Flight!" and "Science!" They knocked him out three times, once for about 22 seconds. Each time he woke up, he'd yell "Science!"and then pass out again. Here's a picture of him getting strapped in! http://imgur.com/NXrb64r (EG)

A:

To become a CEO I would say pick a fast growing industry you are interested in, surround yourself with the best and work hard!


Q:

Hi Jim!

You sat in front of my friend and I at a performance of Hedwig and the Angry Inch on broadway about two years ago. Not only were you kind enough to introduce yourself and my friend and I stared at you in awe, but you took the time to take a picture with us when the show was over since we weren't allowed to take them in the theater. You were so kind and willing to talk to two awkward 18 year olds so I just wanted to thank you, two years later!

My question is: what's your favorite encounter you've had with a fan?

A:

Was the experience frightening in any way?


Q:

That's awesome! Also, same question regarding Channel Super Fun.

A:

do you make enough money to feed the said daughters and live a comfortable life? Serious question


Q:

Why don't you care about people abusing the system

A:

Were you ever approached about working on the new show? I would think if they were going for a reboot then they would want your opinions. At this point the new show is destroying what you guys helped Bill create, he needs you guys to come back to him and recreate the magic you once had!


Q:

What is it like working with Shigeru Miyamoto?

A:

I remember meeting you at Hedwig (great show by the way).

Because of the popularity of P&R it's changed many things in my life. 99% good...1% not so good. I can honestly say that part of the 99% is the interaction I have with the fans. I know a lot of actors aren't happy to stop and talk with their fans but I'm always happy to take pics and chat a little. There were many MANY years as a working actor that nobody knew who the hell I was. The fact that I was lucky enough to land a show like Parks and get to have an impact on peoples lives is something I will never take for granted. I'm honored (and humbled) that people like my work and want to come up to let me know.

For those wondering what the 1% is that isn't so great...people sneaking pictures. I would rather have someone come up and ask for a pic than sneak around trying to get it. For some reason that seems much more invasive to me. :)


Q:

Yes, frightening every second. Not because I was in Pyongyang, but because I was taking notes / writing the book in secret. For average people who visit Pyongyang for whatever organizational reason (that is not a place for a personal curiosity visit since it's basically a gulag positing as a country), it would not be frightening since everything's so controlled.

A:

Rocket League in Real Life was really exciting at the time. It hadn't really been done and we thought with some more production values Channel Super Fun had the opportunity to go viral.

But it didn't really work out that way.


Q:

I am gainfully employed and we are a dual-income household.

A:

Me specifically? It's not my job.

The venue? We didn't really have a way to easily police it without seriously diminishing the guest experience with some form of check at entry, which would slow down an already glacial process at times. Add to that that it's not a huge venue that gets sold out immediately and there's no real reason to focus on that over other improvements elsewhere.


Q:

Thanks - we were never approached though always happy to help out (eg)

A:

Hello! What is fantastic about working with Nintendo and with Miyamoto in particular is that you are working with the best. It's easy to work with the smartest people in the industry and they have a great understanding of what works and we are very often on the same page about how to solve a problem.


Q:

Hey Jim Gengurch! I love your acting in many shows I've seen, especially P&R.

The finale after special refers to you being the most different from your character. Which other actors are most distant from their characters and most similar?!

Also, how much do you miss P&R?!

A:

What made you want to go undercover in North Korea considering all of the dangers?


Q:

Hi Linus! How much shit do you get for your footwear choice?

A:

Hi Sasha! Fellow math phd here. I find it interesting that people would frame your choices as selfish and wasteful-- to me that says everything about how many people, especially in America, frame math education (and education in general) as a field for people with "not enough" talent.

We should be thrilled that more subject experts are going into education. The potential for added value coming from even one person who really loves their subject is enormous. I'm sure many of us, who have either gotten our phds or work in a math-adjacent field, can credit that one teacher who inspired us along the way. I had teachers like that in 11th and 12th grade who really changed everything for me.


Q:

ive been doing that for almost 3 years! my theater is going dark for 3 months now and i am jobless try as i might.

which ticketmaster did you use? we had an old school version TMWin99

A:

Do you have a favourite episode or project of Bill's that you worked on?


Q:

How do you deal with the negative comments from so many players about your games?

A:

Missing P&R is something I will do the rest of my life. I spent six years (7 seasons) with the greatest cast and crew that has ever been assembled (in my humble opinion). Thankfully the cast are constantly texting each other and staying in touch. I keep in touch with a lot of the crew too. That being said...nothing will ever be like going to work every day to laugh with people you truly loved.

As far as people being different from their characters...As actors I think we all bring a certain part of ourselves to every role. It's just natural. Nick Offerman is a smart man who can build anything. So that's like Ron. On the other hand I think politically they might be at odds.


Q:

You know. . .I don't really know. I could give all the usual answers how I was so tortured by the injustice there - which is true - and how I felt horrified watching so many separation that happened to families, including my own - which is also true. But the answer is a far more complicated one. So I recently wrote a long essay on this very topic for Lapham's Quarterly, which should be coming out any day now. So I will tweet that out when the piece comes out. I think it has something to do with fear. How that society is built on fear, and how fear can dictate us, and how we try to fight that fear in life. . .I know it's maybe a bit nonsensical in this AMA answer format, for which I apologyze. . .but the more accurate answer would be that I jumped in there because it was the most scary place in the world for me. . .if that makes any sense.

A:

Well I'm getting some now, so that should give you some idea :p


Q:

Yes, it is definitely important to have those inspiring teachers. My love of math initiated from my father who is a math and physics high school teacher. He showed me the beauty and elegance of math from an early age by giving me lots of logic puzzles and having math conversations about everyday things. I also had a few really good math teachers in high school and college as well.

My coauthor, on the other hand, had some terrible math teachers in high school and grew up hating math. Luckily, one awesome professor in college made her fall in love with it, and she is now a Computer Science professor at Columbia. More of her story here: https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/from-math-hater-to-mathematician-and-computer-scientist-the-story-of-allison-bishop/

A:

Yeah, we used the old-school DOS-ass TMWin99. When I was training people I always said it's like using a program written in Swahili or something- you can learn a phrase or two and learn your way around to do some basic stuff, but beyond that it's really tough to figure out unless you've been doing it forever. It's a lot of rote memorization and repetition, which takes new guys a while to figure out.


Q:

We did 100 episodes in four years. It was crazy and I really have to say there were so many different moments and episodes.... Wetlands stands out to me, personally. I love swamps. Also, the Watercycle show. The kid in the music video still brings a tear to my eye. We also spent two weeks in Japan in one of the most incredible science adventures one could imagine. Here's a picture of me in Japan on this adventure... they made me stay in the outfit the entire time. http://imgur.com/7nwK8E8 (JM)

 

One of my fave episodes is The Eyeball - great sketch - props - music video, I think it was one of the few times we got a scathing letter about how someone's daughter went running from the room because she saw a glass eye in one of the profiles (EG)

A:

Hi there, first things first I read them! I very often dispatch and share them with our teams with my comments and I think they help us prioritise what we need to fix and get a good insight into the biggest concerns of our communities.


Q:

Please don't say Jeremy Jamm....

A:

Hi Ms. Kim! As someone who is in the middle of “Without You There Is No Us” I am thrilled that you are doing an AMA for us, so thank you! My question is, while you were exhausted by the lies your students had no hesitation in participating in, were there any students in particular whom you felt was less into the shade of the regime? Or any student who has slipped up and revealed something that shouldn’t have been reveal to you? And I might as well: what was one of the most outrageous lies you remember your students telling you? Thank you so much once again!


Q:

So... are you friends?

A:

This so much.

After getting my PhD (Sorbonne) I worked in my industry for a few years. The stress got to me so I quit and - no joke - got a job at the local McDonalds. I was much more happy. I did that for a few years, then started a few companies and retired by the age of 40.

Never underestimate happiness, the feeling of making a true difference, and zero career stress.

You go Sasha! Yeah!


Q:

next??: reclas cff0923/x1/rd/s4-7

A:

What was your favorite moment with Bill?


Q:

What is your personal opinion on Rainbow Six Siege?

A:

You've been JAMMED! ;)


Q:

I guess the boys lying broke my heart because they were always so absurd. What was heartbreaking about it was because there was no logic to any of it. Once a smartest, savviest student pretended to go shopping within the campus (when there was no shop & he could not go outside) but he knew that I knew that there was no shopping happening. So why did he lie? It was the way very little children would lie to avoid the moment, not a 19 year old young man. Also the fact that very same young man was normally so bright & quick witted upset me more. What made it outrageous was not that they were lying but that they continued with these nonsensical lies that would be caught instantly. Why? That was complicated which I discussed in the book. What happens to human mind when you have been brought up inside outrageous lies for generations, where lies are encouraged, where lies have different weight or value, where lies become ways of a survival etc etc. . .I guess it was that disconnect that I found unacceptable and outrageous and horrible, because that disconnect was happening in my boys whom I loved and respected and adored. So I would have to say it was the disconnect that I found to be inhumanely imposed by their regime.

A:

Linus' status was changed to: It's complicated


Q:

I don't know about the "zero" career stress, because I can by no means call my current job "stress-free", but I agree with you on everything else. I think that for many people, one of the hard parts is actually figuring out what it is that would make them happy. I feel fortunate to have found something that I feel so passionate about.

A:

But I wanted the aisle. You have the aisle right?


Q:

There were so many favorite moments. Inside the crater of Mt. St. Helen's comes to mind. Once, while on the road, Bill had fashioned a device for viewing a solar/lunar eclipse. He tells us to stop and we find an open location next to some tennis courts with a bunch of ladies in mid-game. Suddenly, Bill has the box on his head, screaming "It works, it works!" It was pretty awesome, but the ladies found it a little strange.-(jm) Here's a picture from that day! http://imgur.com/QdZXNuY

 

A memorable moment for me (EG) was down in Florida for a space shuttle launch, which I got to see, but Bill had to have his back to it the whole time since he was talking on on camera. (jm) same thing happened at Old Faithful

A:

I love it! It's the first time that we have seen that level of engagement and passion around a game we've created.


Q:

Did you start this AMA by going to alta vista and typing in "Please take me to Reddit?"

A:

Do people in North Korea really see Kim jong un, Kim jong il, and Kim il-sung as essentially a god, or is it an act?

What do the people high in the workers party think of the western world?


Q:

So Linus, what video do you hate the most on all of your channels? And why?

A:

It's strange; I think education is one of the best uses for a math degree, in terms of use to society. Certainly more impactful than theoretical research, and I'm speaking as someone who wants to become a category theorist.


Q:

Sigh... (types in a string of code to release print flag and start all over!)

A:

How important do you think striking a balance between entertaining your audience and informing them is? Was there ever a time or topic where you found it difficult to keep it fun enough for kids to stay glued to the TV but still educate them?


Q:

Proudest moment in your career?

A:

Is there another way? ;)


Q:

The difficulty of this question is that they are also human beings and complex. Sometimes it is possible to believe as well as not believe. They do see him as essentially a god, but some also don't. Sometimes these beliefs co-exist. My students were like this often with me. I was their enemy because I came from the western world as well as South Korea (which is their enemy) but then I was their teacher, the only one they saw everyday they relied on, so they loved me at the same time. And it is that conflict within their humanity vs the inhumanity of their world that makes North Korea exceptionally tragic. Also, imagine, they were brought up in that system for 3 generations. It is a bit like a cult religion, so even if you might have some doubts, it is literally the world they come from, the only world they know and are allowed to see and be in. So it's a bit like hating a father you also grew up to worship. It's as conflicted as that. Because they are not "brainwashed" or robots, the problem becomes far more complex. Yes, they view the western world as their enemy but a part of them might want to see it or feel a bit worshipping of it, but they live in a world that is not allowed so they cannot ever show it. So it's a combination of all those things.

A:

Firetruck unboxing video. I wouldn't even hate it so much if it didn't have more views than all of the GOOD STUFF I've ever done.

If it didn't make so much money in adsense from 5 year olds just watching "the next suggested video about firetrucks" I'd pull it down. It's an embarrassment.


Q:

I think that they both have their value to society. I felt more passionate about teaching children than about doing research, so that's what I pursued. I think that people should pursue their dreams to the extent that they can and then society will benefit from having more happy and satisfied people.

A:

That's why you use the shopping cart in SELL and hold onto that shit until you're SURE they've made up their damn minds.


Q:

Good question. Bill leaned more to education, we leaned more to entertainment, a constant battle so to speak. We always felt if they are not having fun they will tune out. Bill kept us on point with the message. We always tried to present different ways to learn, I (EG) got the most out of the sketch/humor parts, so I always leaned towards that. Bill always had great real world analogies. There were times we felt a show might be a little flat and then it went thru audio post at Bad Animals and we were always cracking up in the final review.

A:

Thanks for the question! I would say the launch of the first Splinter Cell and the first Assassin's Creed were both amazing. They were the culmination of a lot of work and were both great successes. These were both fantastic moments for me as they represent turning points for Ubisoft and a great pay off for big risks that we took. And of course yesterday with Miyamoto was pretty special as well :)


Q:

Do you actually know how to play piano?

A:

What did you enjoy about NK?


Q:

Any recommendations for best cable management practices? Zipties? Velcroes? Twine?

A:

As a kid many people never saw the coolest things math does. Even teachers were not great at explaining the places math could take you. As a math major finishing my degree, I am seeing the amazing connections math has to everything.

Now that you have all this knowledge, how will you demonstrate to kids the wonder and far reaches of math to inspire them?


Q:

when i was first training i wrote a python code that printed and responded to TM commands so i could practice. building it also was super fun and probably helped me learn it faster. wish i still had the code.

A:

How was Bill off camera? How much did he play up his personality?


Q:

What are some of the key things you look for when being presented with a new game idea?

A:

Not a note. lol :)


Q:

"Enjoy" would not be the right word, I think. But I have great empathy for the place because they are suffering. I am American but I am also Korean, and as a Korean, I feel for the less privileged half. Also as a human being, I find the existence of the place and the inhumane treatment of the people there unacceptable. So it's not that I enjoy North Korea -- which I do not, I find the place to be horrifying -- but I am drawn to North Korea. But joy is of course there. My students I met there and fell in love with were all full of joy, because they were young and sweet and adorable and innocent and there were some fun times we shared, but they were also full of darkness, because of their society.

A:

Yes. I highly recommended Linus brand cable ties. They are available in any colour and style you want as long as you want orange with my face on it.


Q:

In the curriculum that i'm developing I make sure to cover a broad range of topics, from logic to probability theory, to geometry. I also make sure to have plenty of activities where they can explore and discover some of the math for themselves.

Here is an example, I recently did a lesson on logic using problems from Smullyan's book "What is the name of this book?" I was amazed at the freedom and depth of my students' thinking. They were really questioning all the assumptions and not just trying to look for "the one right answer."
Here is a post I made about the conversation: https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/2017/04/25/logical-fun-part-i/ and I describe many similar in spirit lessons on my blog.

A:

Yeah, coding's never been my strong suit. Glad you figured out a way to pick it up quickly though, that shit gets complex.


Q:

On camera, Bill played the Science Guy. Off camera, Bill was Bill Nye, human- one that loves, laughs and is passionate about what he does. To be on camera, you have to push that personality.

A:

Thanks for your question. I look for a few important things. I want to know what I’m going to learn about myself and the world by playing this game, is the game rich enough that am I going to want to play for a long time and that it’s engaging enough that I’ll want to progress. I also want to know if I can play with my friends and in a way that each person can bring something unique to the experience. Lastly I look for an innovation brought by the game that has the potential to disrupt the industry.


Q:

Hey Tim,

You've kind of been defined by your role on Parks & Rec, but you've had a long and impressive career. Is there one movie or TV show you've been in -- other than Middle Man -- that you'd recommend to people looking to see a little more of you? A performance you're particularly proud of?

A:

What advice would you have for the general public regarding "how to understand the world, especially the "other" who we have not personally encountered?" Specifically, in the age of infinite information, fake news, and polarized sources, how does the public sift through and make meaning of their world?


Q:

When you created Linus Tech Tips and then Linus Media Group, is that what you envisioned from the beginning or did it take a lot different of a turn then you expected?

A:

I'm in the midst of a math education degree and work as a private tutor for grades 7-12 , it seems like the broad underlying issue for most of my students is that they never really got on the math bandwagon when they were younger and have been playing catch up for years.

From your experiences and research, is this type of hangup as common as it seems in my experiences?

And a follow-up, in the same vein: what are the keys to getting students in the K-5 range genuinely interested in math? Or if not interested in math, at least not scared of it.


Q:

Used to work with Ticketmaster too, but at a venue. I actually sort of enjoyed TMWin99. Autypes ftw.

A:

What did you think of Beakman's World?


Q:

Quick follow-up question to you saying you look for unique multiplayer experience, does that mean you aren't necessarily interested in pursuing any style of single player and or campaign heavy titles? Also thanks for taking time to do an AMA

A:

Great question. I've been blessed to have been working in this crazy business for over twenty years. Because of the popularity of Parks I'll always be best known as Jerry which is a gift. I love when I get to sink my teeth into a dramatic role. Dark comedies are my favorites. It's one of the things that led me to Middle Man. I'm not the "funny" guy in the film yet I get a lot of laughs. I love getting a new script and figuring out what I'm going to do with it.

As far as finding something I did in the past...hmmm...I did an episode of Diagnosis Murder where I got to play a crazed serial killer. I had a lot of fun with that. I would also check out a remake of Harvey I did many years ago with Leslie Nielsen, Swoosie Kurtz and Harry Anderson. It was one of my first films. I look like a baby. It was an amazing experience. :)


Q:

This is really relevant. Fake news seems to dictate our world now, but I do believe due to the rise of fake news (or the method in which they can travel has grown tremendously due to the internet & the ease / speed of the internet publishing), the need for the real in-depth news has also risen. So if you were to look around, you will see so much more information on almost everything. I do think this means we have to just look more. And also I think because of the policing that happens as the result of the surplus of info, we can't get away with bogus information anymore the same way. North Korea is a perfect example of there being so much junk out there posing as info. So then you have to check who is saying that, who is writing it, what do they know etc etc. In the past, the story of the "other" belonged solely to Orientalists, who basically imposed their colonial view of the "other." Much of that still goes on, but I hope with all the policing, we are enforcing more quality control, perhaps. So that you can't just claim yourself "expert" when you don't speak the language, or hardly had been to the place, etc. So in fact, the general public can in fact inform themselves more thoroughly and resposibly these days, if they care to.

A:

It's really different. I imagined that after 5 years we would have 4-5 people and that as long as we could afford to pay everyone a fair salary to do what we loved it would be awesome.

I also had in my mind that I wanted to be a "real company" with things like employee benefits and a dental plan and stuff.

Well if you want to do that you add some administrative overhead unless you want to do everything yourself.

Then you realize part of being a real company is giving people reasonable work/life balance and covering for them when they need vacation time.. so you hire some additional bodies..

Then you realize that now that you've got to manage these extra people and you have no time to work on sales deals with brands anymore.

So you hire a sales guy who manages to use all the extra time he has (because he's not making videos) to double your ad rates and find new buyers for them.

Then you've got more resources to build out the team further and make better videos than ever..

And it continues to snowball from there.

I had this realization at one point that if you're employing world class people they won't want to be in entry level positions making entry level pay forever. You have to give them opportunities to improve their craft and get promotions and raises if you want to retain them.

And the only way to do that is to keep growing and building out a support structure for them.

And I don't think there are many who would argue that we don't have a world class team of YTers here.


Q:

I believe it's quite common.

I think that the key to getting K-5 students interested in math is by making it creative and letting them explore and discover concepts rather than imposing it upon them. You make it visual, you let them play with it.

For example, when we study nets of cubes, we actually build them with magformers and students figure out which ones can actually fold into a cube. When we study functions, they're not abstract but we literally put objects in and out of a "function machine." For example, I describe this activity here https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/2015/05/12/kid-in-the-machine/, and there are many other such examples on my blog.

You also need to show them a wide range of topics. It is generally believed in our society that being good in math means being good at computation. However, there is so much more to math than arithmetic, and children should be shown that. I have students who struggle with arithmetic but are incredible at spacial reasoning or logic puzzles. They need to be shown that this is also math and given an opportunity to be successful at it.

A:

Only ever learned WCPRTDOS, honestly. I still keep in touch with everyone I worked with so if you know any good ones I'll send them their way to mess with.


Q:

Very high production quality. We were so bummed when we first heard about the show actually hitting the airwaves before us, we thought we were doomed. But then we said - hey - there's more than one Oprah, as in talk shows....can there really be too many kid science shows out there. We embraced it. (eg)

A:

One of the things I am proud of is that we have something in our line-up for many types of players and this is something we will continue to develop. We will still make games that are only solo or only multiplayer as long as they provide super rich and engaging experiences.


Q:

What was Jerry's worst day at the office?

A:

Hi! Which do you like writing more? Nonfiction or fiction? Do you consider yourself a writer of "Korean-American" literature or does that tag/category bother you? I thought The Interpreter was a great novel; one of my favorites.


Q:

What a great way to describe how to grow a business. I love that you value the folks that are making your company succeed.

A:

"Okay kids, today I'm going to tell you a story about Hoppity the Math Bunny.

Hoppity was hopping down the lane when he saw a book lying in the road! What sort of book was it? It was a book about math, kids! We love math don't we?

And what do you suppose that Hoppity read in the book, kids? He found out it was a book about graphs! What sort of graphs do you think he read about, kids? CLAW FREE graphs, that's right.

He read all about Dr Hadwiger who was a VERY smart man who lived in Switzerland! We love Switzerland, don't we? That's where they make chocolate and cukoo clocks isn't it?

So anyway, Hoppity read that Hadwiger’s conjecture states that every graph with chromatic number χ has a clique minor of size χ. Let G be a graph on n vertices with chromatic number χ and stability number α. Then since χα ≥ n, Hadwiger’s conjecture implies that G has a clique minor of size n.

And after reading that, Hoppity was so tired he lay down in the road, and fell asleep. Then he got run over by a truck. The End."


Q:

Why did they switch to Ticketmaster?

Did Ticketmaster convince them to through a sales pitch or did they just go out and select the most famous and biggest broker without looking at all the competitors of Ticketmaster?

Why did they no longer sell in house? What reason did they give?

A:

has he flopped his stance on anything he once believed

I can see where that would be an "interesting issue" for a faith based belief, but this is considered a good ability to have in science. If you can't change your views with the advance of scientific discovery, then you're a bad scientist.


Q:

I've heard it said multiple ways. I'd like to know from the source. What is the correct pronunciation of the word Ubisoft?

A:

I think the "mugging" was a pretty bad day for Jerry. He knew that if they found out what really happened (dropped a burrito in the creek) that he would take hell for days. I love how he came up with the mugging story. To think that he thought he could get away with it kills me. :)


Q:

I am always torn between the two genres. But if I really had to choose, I guess my heart is with fiction. But nonfiction makes my brains flow perhaps in a really exciting way. And my nonfiction in general is literary that I get my fiction angst/fill through that way. I don't know which I "like" writing better. Writing is so torturous for me that it's only after finishing it or nearing the end that I can enjoy it:) No, I do not consider myself a Korean-American literature writer. That genre is an odd one for fiction writers. I guess one cannot help that in coming up with genres, but especially fiction, to be limited by my nationality or immigration history is uncomfortable. I guess I just want to be a "writer", period. Yes, The Interpreter -- so many years later, I myself still have a real soft spot for Suzy Park, so thank you.

A:

It's really important to me personally. I believe the wealth gap in 2017 is a big load of bullshit and I don't want anyone working here to feel so far removed from me that we can't relate to each other anymore. No one is so valuable that they should make 100x what their average staff does.

By the same token if someone isn't pulling his or her weight, I'm not slowing down the bus..

We believe in hard work and being rewarded for it.


Q:

This looks familiar :-)

A:

We still sold in house, we just used an in-house ticketing system that worked in tandem with the room reservation system before (I think it was called Showgate) and switched to all Ticketmaster in tandem with a major remodel about two years back. The difference in show quality was noticeable- we were getting good shows before, but we jumped from D-listers on average to B-listers. No Taylor Swift or Metallica or whatever, but still a lot bigger draws that pulled in a lot more sales. I'm willing to bet a lot of them got on board because their agents or record labels or whatever work exclusively through Ticketmaster. Like it or not, they opened doors.


Q:

As far as I know, nothing flip-flopped, if anything he seems to have become more political. We totally support his stance on climate change. (eg)

A:

Hi... we actually made a video about this last year, you can see it here >> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IU61WkEVFWY


Q:

I was watching Star Trek Voyager this week and came accross an episode in which you made a brief appearance playing a character that is the quintessential Jerry/Terry/Larry, and it left me feeling oddly uplifted for the rest of the day.

Is this type of character one you especially enjoy acting, or do you feel that you've been typecasted?

A:

Hello Ms. Kim.

I enjoy your Twitter posts and found your Guardian piece comparing the political chaos in Korea to the U.S. very enlightening. In your experience, what are the biggest misconceptions Americans have about either North or South Korea?


Q:

What's the most expensive thing you have ever broken?

A:

I am sorry I assume you speak Russian but have you heard of Приключения Капитана Нулика? It's a math-based adventure book too. I was raised on it.

Edit: prepositions, or an alternate title Фрегат Капитана Единицы


Q:

Might as well get the obvious out of the way - what's your best and worst customer experience stories?

A:

Why did the show end?


Q:

How do you buff a god?

A:

I love playing a Jerry type character. I'm sure it will be something I'll do forever. The problem in Hollywood is that they can easily put you in a certain box. Typecasting like you mentioned. It's just the nature of the biz. The gift of Middle Man is that I get to step out of that box and really dig into a deeply disturbed character. :)


Q:

I think the biggest misconception goes back to the basic premise. Most Americans have no idea why there are two Koreas, or why there are 30,000 US soldiers in South Korea and why North Korea hates America so much. That very basic fact has been sort of written out of the American consciousness. By repackaging the Korean War as a civil war, it has now created decades of a total misconception. The fact that the US had actually drawn the 38th Parallel that cut up the Korean peninsula, not in 1950 (the start of the war) but in 1945 at the liberation of Korea from Japan is something that no Korean has forgotten -- that was the beginning of the modern Korean tragedy. That the first Great Leader (the grandfather of the current Great Leader) was the creation of the Soviet Union (along with the US participation) is another horrible puzzle piece that Americans have conveniently forgotten.

A:

I think Berkel holds the record for most expensive stuff broken... He got out of his chair, which caused the air shock to spring up, knocking over a 34" LG Ultrawide back when they were brand new (about $1500US iirc).

I was also (somewhat) responsible for taking our Sony FS700 out for a shoot in the rain (Brandon LET me do it, so it's partly on him). It didn't work for a few days and we had to disassemble it to the greatest degree we could to dry it out.. Scary times. That was in the early days when we couldn't have afforded to replace it :p


Q:

I have heard of it but haven't read it. Will check it out!

A:

Best is kinda hard, just because I'm usually pretty happy when a customer is just a normal dude. One that comes to mind is this blind guy that called us every once in awhile to have us read the show schedule to him. He usually called when it was slow so I didn't really mind taking the time to talk, and he was extremely friendly and liked to share stories about shows he'd seen. Normally people who share stories get dull, but I loved talking to him.

Worst is a lot easier- this one guy came up a year or so before we remodeled, when the seat plan was a bunch of tables and booths. The booths seated 4, but there was one at the perfect spot that seated 8. It was the owner's booth, as in The Owner Of The Casino Sits Here So Do Not Fucking Sell This To Anyone.

This guy comes up one day dressed like he was late to his job as an extra for Tom Cruise's character in Tropic Thunder (only with hair) and asks for the owner's booth for a show. I told him no, I'm sorry, we can't sell that booth, and he drops a $100 bill on the countertop like he just unlocked the keys to the kingdom. I told him no again, then he started getting all kinds of huffy with me, trying to bargain and stuff. Eventually he goes "look, just get me your manager", so I turn around to my manager (who's standing right behind me talking to his boss and heard the whole thing) and ask if he can help. The guy tries the same shit again with my manager like five times and eventually, while I'm standing right there, points at me and goes "Come on, I'm trying to show him what it's like to have money."

Obviously not a guest that flung shit at me or threatened me or anything, but that one's really stuck with me. Casinos get a lot of entitled guests, it comes with the VIP rewards program, but that was fucking insulting.


Q:

Funding. We got up to 85 episodes in the can and Disney said no more. Our Exec Elizabeth Brock brilliantly went to PBS and said Disney wants to fund 15 more to get us to 100 episodes. Then she went back to Disney and said PBS wants to fund 15 more episodes...so they both kicked in and we made it to 100 episodes and then money dried up. (eg)

A:

You'll have to ask the team here >> https://www.reddit.com/r/Rainbow6/ ;)


Q:

Hi Jim!

At one point in P&R, it is referenced that your character has a very large penis. Does that take any method acting on your part?

A:

Anyone know where can I find information regarding how the first great leader was a creation of the USA & soviets? I'd love to read about it


Q:

What upcoming product are you and the team most excited to get a review sample on?

A:

What was your go to hoagie from Hoagie Haven?


Q:

"One that comes to mind is this blind guy that called us" -> ".. liked to share stories about shows he'd seen."

i feel terrible but was he always blind or..?

A:

Where did that the idea for Bill Nye The Science Guy come from?


Q:

Obviously a long shot, but would it be possible to meet you at E3?

So excited to see all of Ubisoft's projects at E3!

A:

Great question. From what I understand one of the writers were standing next to me at the urinal and thought it was time to mix real life and TV life. Made perfect sense to me. lol ;)


Q:

That would be taking it out of the context to claim that first Great Leader was "created" by US. He was a soldier (protege of the Soviet), while US participated in that set up handpicking the US educated South Korean first president. US had drawn the 38th Parallel, and that division was trumpeted by the Cold War, two separate gov't formed by 1948 & war broke out in 1950. That is a very simplified version of the history of the two Koreas which most Americans don't remember and now wonder why they are in South Korea today and why is North Korea mad at them. If you are genuinely curious, there are many many books on this topic by serious historians.

A:

Threadripper.

Super stoked.


Q:

This is going to sound blasphemous, but I was a Wawa girl.

A:

No idea. Weird language on my end, my bad. We've gotten blind people coming in before, they just take the cheap seats way in the back since the sound's good through the whole place.


Q:

Bill, Erren and I met at KING-TV, the Seattle NBC affiliate. Bill and I were working on a comedy show called Almost Live! I actually produced Bill's first sketch on the show about why steam rises from the manhole covers in downtown Seattle. He was the "Why Guy" then and did not have the character worked out. Later, when a guest failed to show for an episode, Bill was assigned the title "Science Guy" by our host, Ross Shafer and told to get out there and perform. Next thing we know he shows up at the writer's meeting in almost perfect "Science Guy" uniform.

A few years later, Erren and I are working on an idea to create a show for national distribution out of Seattle. We kept hearing about the need to teach math and science and started working on the concept of a half-hour show starring Bill. There were numerous shorts that we had to do to prove the concept. A six minute piece called Fabulous Wetlands won a gold medal at the New York Festivals and we used that along with another video called "Who is Bill Nye, Anyway?" to pitch the show. That pitching went on for about four years before we found the money for the pilot. (jm)

A:

If you see me on the booth please come say hello!


Q:

Hi!!
Who was the funniest cast member on Parks and Rec and who was the most fun to work with?
Also how similar is Nick Offerman to Ron Swanson? (in my head they're the same person)
Thanks!!

A:

How long did it take between the time you had this idea and actually going through with it? (Apologies if you covered that in the book, it's been a while since I read it.)


Q:

Hi LTT, what's the progress on those 3 computers running behind the walls? Or is it super secret? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5r58fGVaaDQ

A:

That's amazing ! There are not many people like you who are willing to follow what they believe in over making a lot of money! So mad respects for you ! Have you experienced a lot of people who criticised you over your decision/ tried to stop you?


Q:

So what did your boss end up doing to show him what it's like to have money?

Did he take him out back and kneecap him like the good old days of the Casinos?

Did he take him to the high rollers room and let him see thousands of dollars being poured into a single tug on the Helllooooo machines?

Did he show him the vault then kick him out?

I'm burning with questions as to how this ended.

A:

How did you pick Nye?

Were there other candidates with more academic credentials passed over in favor of Nye's stage presence?


Q:

What's your favorite kind of cheese 🧀?

A:

They were all funny. What a lot of people don't know is that after every scene we did a "fun run". That's where we got to play around and do whatever we wanted while telling the same story that was on the page. Most of us had an improv background so it made sense to let us play together. We did that EVERY DAY. I think it's one of the reasons we stayed so close as a cast. That being said...Chris Pratt is so off the cuff funny that it's crazy. Really really funny. I had fun working with each and ever one of them. That's not Hollywood bullshit. I loved them all...and still do. :)


Q:

The whole idea for the literary nonfiction on North Korea came in February 2002 when I first went to Pyongyang for the 60th Birthday celebration of Kim Jong Il & wrote the NYRB cover essay. I realized then that an essay was just not enough, and there was just so much more I felt about this topic, also given my family background etc. From then on, it was trying to study the topic as thoroughly as I could, by literally researching it from afar and close, i.e. following defectors through the defection route, interviewing separated families, and situating myself in places where I could either go to North Korea or learn more in-depth stuff about it. Even my Fulbright research grant which allowed me to live in Seoul for 14 months in 2009 was for this book. As well as each visit that allowed me to get a different perspective. Understanding it from all sides was a key, and I felt that I had exhausted that by the time I lived there in 2011. So all in all, I would say about a decade.

A:

STILL RUNNING!


Q:

Typically, people have been very supportive. Also, people might not realize, I am still gainfully employed, just changed my focus.

A:

Nah, see, that's the old school. These days that kneecapping stuff is, yknow, a crime. Instead we just chucked pennies at him and called him names.

Really though we just kinda kept refusing until he got pissed and asked for the casino manager. Gladly gave him the number so that guy could tell him no too.


Q:

We all worked together at KING-TV in Seattle. There was no picking. It just was. (EG)

A:

I would say Époisses de Bourgogne! You can see it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89poisses_de_Bourgogne


Q:

I was listening to an interview with him and Ron was based off nick but everything is greatly exaggerated.

A:

How much did u make as a teacher? Easy thing to get into (teaching English in N Korea)? Last one - any dangers associated with just teaching in N. Korea?


Q:

will there be a short update video at all or just waiting until its been a year?

A:

Could you be so kind as to explain the pros and/or cons between the former traditional educational model and the rising popularity of "common core"? I want to ride they hype train as it sounds like people love it but gosh darned if my ignorance just makes it look LONGER to do. Thank you!


Q:

Tropic Thunder is still one of the greatest movies of the past few decades

A:

Did you guys get a slice of Saves The World? You deserve, at minimum, a nibble.


Q:

Which chocolate do you prefer?

  1. Swiss
  2. Belgian
  3. Whatever's melting on my tongue
  4. White, because I don't know what I'm talking about ;)
A:

That's pretty much it. Nick is such a great guy and so is Ron. They just took Nick to an nth degree. What he did with that character was something I have never seen on another show. I've always been confused on why he never received an Emmy for his work. :)


Q:

It was an unpaid job. I believe every teacher was sponsored by their church. There is not a danger in teaching in North Korea, but this is a gulag nation, and America is their enemy, and there is no diplomatic relations between them, so if you are a teacher from the US, then, yes you are in danger, as evidenced by the recent hostage crisis where two American detained by North Korea (currently still held there) are from the university where I taught.

A:

We're gonna wait the full year :)


Q:

First, what most people don’t realize is that the Common Core is not a curriculum but rather a set of standards of goals and expectations for the knowledge and skills that a student should obtain. These standards are quite reasonable, but how they’re implemented is another story. The content actually is very similar to what was there before .

And the main problem I believe is with the assessments. For example, the common core may list multiple ways to do simple addition or subtraction. Administrators see this and say, oh we must not only teach all 5 ways, but we must also test all 5 ways, and for that, we also need to give the ways names.

That is not the goal of the 5 ways though. The goal is to give children a choice and flexibility. The main failure of the common core, in my opinion is not giving support to administrators, teachers, and parents for implementing the standards.

A:

Black Dynamite tho


Q:

you're very kind, but no. (eg)

A:
  1. Swiss Dark Chocolate! I always have a stock on my desk for long meetings.

Q:

Hi Jim!

Jerry/Kerry/Larry/Terry/Gary Gengurch was one of my favorite characters. I can relate to being the clumsy one who's always the butt of the jokes. You never failed to make me smile while portraying him.

What are your dog's names, and can you tell me a bit about them?

A:

In '92-93 I taught English in Prague in the Czech Republic. Eastern Europe had just been opened up from the communists. The sense of euphoria among the people was palpable. Hope exuded from everyone.

I taught businessmen and women who for the first time in their lives had freedom for their entrepreneurial spirit. They came to me every day with hopes and bottles of champagne.

I'm curious about the demeanor of your students. I cannot imagine 'hope' was anywhere around. How can one teach without hope? Thx and best wishes.


Q:

How often do you work with other tech YouTubers like Kyle Jay, Paul, and them? Is it more a business relationship or do you all text and talk often?

A:

The way it's been implemented in my school district is by abolishing advanced math classes and putting everyone in the same math class, resulting in some really bored students who would be doing great in a higher math class but instead do poorly in a class that is mind-numbingly boring to them.


Q:

My rule is always accept free money. Never be bribed. I would have pocketed his hundred and asked him if he would like a different seat.

A:

Hey guys, I think we may have a mutual connection with the fellow standing on the far left of that photo you're holding. Spencer McCulloh here. Didn't expect to see you two on Reddit this morning! But anyways here my question haha. How did Bill Nye end up being the science guy for the show?


Q:

Anything interesting on the horizon that most people don't know about yet?

A:

Thanks so much. My dogs names are Chase (the white one) and Stella (the black one). They're both rescues. Last year I lost both of my other dogs to cancer. I don't have kids so the dogs become like children (some people think that's crazy...that's OK). When they passed away I didn't think I could ever go through it again. After nine months my gut was telling me that it was time again. I went to the Linda Blair World Heart Foundation and found Chase. I knew within two minutes of meeting him that he needed to be with me for the rest of his life. A few months later I went to the Amanda Foundation and met Stella. She had obviously been abused and needed some loving. They're brought the smile back to my face after losing my other two pups. :)


Q:

I wasn't there to teach, so that was not what I was looking for. My students were so busy, every hour of their day was mapped out, so it leaves no time for thinking. I found that world to be without hope. That does not mean that there is no joy in moments. There are because human beings are resilient, and my students were very, incredibly humane and lovely and their youthful spirit was sparklingly beautiful. But there was no real time for them to celebrate any of it. They would relax a bit but the immediately hauled off to their many duties that all had to do with regime & great leader. There was no hope there. So I wrote down what I saw. But I do not know about other teachers who were there to teach, but if you read my book, you will see that the other teachers weren't mostly there to teach but there as a part of their fundamental evangelical missionary purpose.

A:

Being up in Western Canada makes collaboration a little tougher.. and I'm pretty asocial by nature so I haven't generally gone out of my way to "collab" - especially because many collabs are just blatant subscriber swaps

"hey sub to me and sub to him/her and get a chance to win"

But I've also known a lot of the people in the tech tuber scene for YEARS and really enjoy spending time with them. So it's nice to have an excuse to hang out and make a video.

I'm not like sending them dick pics on snapchat or whatever though.


Q:

Unfortunately, the mind-numbingly boring classes are not benefiting anyone, advanced or not.

A:

I would absolutely have considered it were it not for the two bosses standing beside me and the cameras covering every square inch of floor space.


Q:

Hey there! To answer your question, he was born into it. (eg)

A:

As video game creators we have the fantastic power to anticipate and build games that allow us to experience what the world could look like in ten years-time. Playing these games is a way to test and learn and this I believe will have a positive impact on the world.


Q:

Tim,

With this being described as a "black comedy", how was this role different for you in comparison to past roles, and how do you feel audiences will react?

A:

How do you balance your personal time with your wife and kid against work time?


Q:

Does your book try to teach math abstractly or traditionally?

When I learned math in school they just told us operations and the rules to use them with.

But my love of math really started when I learned more pure constructs like functions as a means to map from a source set to a destination set.

I realized that all the rules that people found hard to remember came from these abstract principles, where they made sense, and we're not simply arbitrarily defined.

But abstract math also seems much more complex to reason about.

So to ask my question again in a different way, is your book teaching applied mathematics or pure mathematics?

A:

Point taken. That must have been frustrating.


Q:

Hey guys! Big thank you for Bill Nye the Science Guy. I grew up watching it for my middle school science curriculum (I was homeschooled). I probably wouldn't have gotten my degree in Chemistry in college otherwise. Big thank you!

For your new show, have you had pushback in regards to finances being too "adult and boring" to teach kids?

A:

Thank you for hosting this AMA!

Did you ever think that when you first came into video games over 30 years ago, video games would become this big? (esports etc)


Q:

It's totally different than any other role I've played. My character Lenny starts out in the same vein as Jerry from Parks. A sweet, nice guy. Unfortunately for Lenny he makes one terrible mistake and on his way to Las Vegas he picks up a hitch hiker (played by Andrew J. West). This turns his life upside down. From that moment on we slowly watch the mental unravelling of an otherwise normal dude. Playing the character was terrifying because if I didn't make it work the film doesn't work. From what I hear I did it justice. :)

A:

I suck at it :p

But seriously, I have no social life, so it's just work/family, which makes it a bit easier. I get one night a week to go out and play badminton and other than that I go home and spend time wiht the kids. I've also SIGNIFICANTLY cut back on the time I spend working on the weekends. So it's not too bad at this point.


Q:

The book is doesn't teach math per say. It is first and foremost a fantasy with math intertwined. You wouldn't call the Phantom Tollbooth or Alice in Wonderland a math book, but there is certainly some math to be explored in the stories. Similarly with our book, you can make the experience of reading it as mathematical as you want. We also have a mathematical addendum that addresses the math concepts more directly.

There are many more details about this on the kickstarter page https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/419899136/funville-adventures-a-math-inspired-childrens-book

A:

I was too busy being extremely pissed at that guy for being an incredible asshole, honestly.


Q:

You went on to be a scientist because of the show? Thank you! That was the plan.

We were working on the idea of a financial literacy show for years called Financial Genius. We met our Canadian partner, Jeannine Glista, with her idea for a show on kid entrepreneurs called Biz Kid$. Now, we do about five stories on kids and their money per episode, all wrapped around one general theme.

So many kids think they can't do this, but when you see where some of these kids come from and the ways they are building their financial futures, it can be mind blowing. Some have become multi-millionaires. And I think if these kids can do it, anybody can. (JM)

A:

I thought it would be big, but not this big. What is amazing with this industry is that technology is always giving us fantastic new opportunities to disrupt different genres and segments of games and to create new ones. I believe interactive entertainment is the future of entertainment, and we still have huge opportunities in front of us.


Q:

I read somewhere that you initially auditioned for the role of Ron Swanson. Obviously, Nick was the perfect Ron and you were a fantastic Jerry/Garry/Larry/Terry. So, how did that audition go?

A:

Will LTX become a regular yearly thing? (PLEASE? :D)


Q:

What are your favorite books that address math and logic?

A:

liked to share stories about shows he'd seen heard.


Q:

What was it like working with Bill?

A:

How are you doing today?


Q:

When the word came out that Amy Poehler was doing a show it was something everyone wanted to be involved in. Amy had just come off of an amazing run on SNL as well as a couple of awesome films. My agent called and said that I had an audition for the show for the role of Ron Swanson. I found out later that most male actors in LA audition for the role. The thought of anyone playing Ron Swanson other than Nick Offerman is ridiculous. I think Nick was always who they wanted but the studio made them read tons of people. That is what helped me. Though I didn't get the role of Ron they did see something they liked and brought me back in for Jerry. The producers tell the story that after my Jerry read they just said "He's funny. Let's put him at a desk. It'll work itself out".

As far as my audition for Ron Swanson I don't remember exactly what I did but for I do remember being very stern. Probably too stern. As much as Ron was a ballbuster he was also a softy. I should try and see if I could get a copy of my audition. I'm sure it's horribly embarrassing but it would be a great to see. :)

A:

Depends how the first one goes.

If we lose buckets of money, then no.

If we lose a little bit of money, then probably.

If we break even or make money, then GAME ON!


Q:

A few of my favorites are: The Number Devil, Cat in Numberland, What is the Name of this book? (and others by Smullyan), The Greedy Triangle, How big is a million?, How big is a foot?, books by Martin Gardner. I have more on a slightly outdated list on my blog: https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/kid-oriented-math-reads/

A:

There we go.


Q:

He was an excellent talent, did anything we asked, took direction well. And like the energizer bunny...he kept going and going.It was the perfect team. We all felt we had a mission (to nudge the world as Bill would say) it was a very passionate group, over worked and under paid. (EG)

A:

I'm doing well, a little tired after yesterday's conference but very happy with the response what we've received!


Q:

Was it difficult playing such a wholesome and naive character, when a lot of your other work is so dark and twisted? It's great you have such a wide range.

A:

Hey Linus, I'm a long time fan! I've got your Noctua fans in my system and I'm a floatplane pilot. It's been mesmerising seeing you jump from height to height, going from NCIX to where you are today and it's truly inspiring.

My question to you is, how do you unwind and relax at the end of the day after working so hard for so long?


Q:

Hi Sasha! I had the pleasure of having your father Boris as my teacher throughout my years in high school (from Algebra I MG to BC Calculus). I really admire him for influencing my future and nurturing my love for mathematics, eventually guiding me to pursue a degree in Electrical Engineering.

So my question is, how has your father influenced you to the position you are in right now?

A:

blind guy

shows he’s seen

( ಡ ﹏ ಡ)


Q:

I have been wanting to ask this for YEARS: Who is responsible for the Drew Barrymore sketch? That was absolutely brilliant.

A:

What do you see as the next big leap in gaming technology?


Q:

I love when I get to different types of characters. That's what actors do. Like I mentioned earlier it's hard not to be typecast but it's part of the challenge of being an actor. :)

A:

reading positive, supportive comments like this one.

I also love spending time reading stories to my kids and playing with them and playing badminton.


Q:

My father had a HUGE influence on where I am right now. First, he was the one initiated and then nurtured my love of math. He gave me logic puzzles and had math conversations with me from a very young age. His love of teaching was also a great inspiration, and the fact that he was so respected and loved by his students.

A:

i cri everytim


Q:

It was very impromptu. There was a script Jim can't remember if he wrote it, or Bill, or one of our writers.... but here is an old photo of Drew and Jim together! http://imgur.com/ExAfApD (EG)

A:

I think streaming will be the next big thing, but it will take time before it is ready. Streaming will totally change the way we create and play games, and will again positively disrupt how we think about gaming.


Q:

Have you been able to keep any interesting props or memorabilia from any of your roles?

A:

What are the reasons for sock and sandals?


Q:

For parents of young children out there, what are some things you can do as a parent to encourage math literacy at a young age?

A:

I'm sure it was that guy personally pocketing your after tax dollars and laughing maniacally.


Q:

Are there any statistics that detail the effects the Bill Nye show has had on young people? Is there any hard evidence that suggests there could be a trend between the amount of millennials pursuing science based degrees and professions and the original airing of your show?

A:

Hi Yves What's your favorite flavour of ice cream?


Q:

I try to keep something from every shoot I'm on. Most of it just sits in a box. I figure someday when I'm old (well...older) I'll want to take a trip down memory lane. I have the Jerry Gergich Conference Room RIP plaque on my desk. I see it every day. :)

A:

they're the ulltimate.


Q:

First, make sure to do things that you yourself enjoy. Games and puzzles are a great way to inspire interest in mathematics. One of my favorites for young children is Tiny Polka Dot from Math4Love. Other favorites include SET, SWISH, Blokus, and puzzle from ThinkFun.

Also, read fun stories with math content. Two of my favorites that you can enjoy with fairly young children is The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns and How Big is a Foot by Rolf Muller. Funville Adventures, the book that I coauthored, could be enjoyed by children as young as 5: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/419899136/funville-adventures-a-math-inspired-childrens-book

Also, I would encourage you to have math conversations with your children if you feel comfortable doing so. These don't have to be forced, but can just build on things they say or ask naturally. Here are some from my blog, which I had with my children at various ages (starting at around 4 with my older one and 2 with my younger one): https://aofradkin.wordpress.com/tag/tmwyk/

A:

That was basically my job description for the casino, yeah. Also the toilet clogging in your room was my fault, I spent the service fee money on six gallons of chili the night before.


Q:

I would absolutely love to see some statistics on the effects of the show. We hear from someone almost daily about how the show impacted their lives and they made a decision to go into a field of science because of it. That is very gratifying. (JM)

A:

Chocolate!


Q:

First Aubrey played a character named Lenny in 'Legion' and now you're playing Lenny in 'Middle Man'.

Who do you think the next one from Parks and Recreation to play a Lenny...?

Personally, I'm hoping it is Li'l Sebastian.

A:

Given unlimited Budget, what would be a video that you would like to shoot? Most interested in answers from Linus and Brandon.


Q:

oh, even if it's true, you really shouldn't say things like that on the internet. That just encourages even more people to be assholes acting entitled to something.

A:

Scientists like to debate almost everything. How did you deal with members of the scientiffic community taking issue with certain subjects that were covered on Bills show?


Q:

What's the first game you've ever played?

A:

You nailed it. Li'l Sebastian will be starring as Lenny in "Of Mice and Men". Can't wait to see it. :)


Q:

I want to make a movie trailer.

Not a movie.

Just a trailer.

But with BADASS high production values so it would be a TON of fun to shoot. It'd be basically a bunch of sketches back to back without having to deal with the boring parts of making a movie like real dialogue and a story arc and character development.

I just can't figure out how to fund it other than stealing $100,000+ from the LMG coffers and putting it in a firepit...

A:

I said it in the other response to this, it doesn't really change what I offer (I'm always out to find people the best seats possible), just the level of customer service I provide. For assholes, it's pretty much just "polite and to the point" to get it over with faster.


Q:

The original Disney Presents Bill Nye the Science Guy series had very little negative comments from the scientific community. At the time, we tried to do the best research our budget allowed. We had a team of qualified young science researchers and a broad based science advisory board. We did our best with the information available at the time. Now, of course, there is this thing called the internet... (JM)

A:

The first game I played was a Space Invaders arcade machine, which I loved!


Q:

Nick Offerman as Lenny in "Of Mice and Men" would be interesting

A:

Hi Linus, how much of your time actually goes into making content nowadays, compared to how much of it is needed for managing the business?


Q:

paid less in service fees buying it in person ($2.50 per as of the time I left)

BO wasn't service-fee-free? I've always figured box office was always the baseline "inconvenient" option to justify "convenience fees" for all the rest. Where I am it is-- no fees on buying at the venue.

A:

What were your first reactions when you met Bill in person?


Q:

Damn. Should have read this before my previous comment. I guess Nick and Lil' Sebastian are going to have to fight this one out. :)

A:

It's not that I'm not spending time making content, it's just that I'm involved in OVERSEEING the process rather than actually DOING it.


Q:

The $2.50 "facilities fee" was a very recent change. A month ago you'd have been right on the money. Dunno the thought process behind it.

A:

I thought he was cute (eg)


Q:

Hey Jim! Big fan of your work, my dad was actually one of the people that invested enough to be an extra in Middle Man so we are super excited to see it in theatres! My question to you is, who has been your all time favorite actor/actress to work with? Thanks so much!

A:

Can you make one more computer with your son?? The earlier one was really cute


Q:

What about for a really popular show? My fear with going in person is that if you aren't at the front of the line at the box office when tickets go on sale that you'll end up with nothing. For a show that's likely to be a quick sell out is there any advantage to going to the box office or are you better off on the website?

A:

What was the original goal you had in mind when forming the idea of the show? Was it just to educate?

Also, why was it created? Was there a something else in television that you were trying to contrast? Or was it just mandated educational material from higher ups?

What was something you wanted to include—science-wise—that couldn't make it for whatever reason?


Q:

Tell you dad thanks from me. Without our Kickstarter campaign we would not have been able to make the film that we did. I'm still blown away that strangers gave us their hard earned money to help us make our dream project. It's very humbling.

I mentioned earlier that I have too many all time favorite actors to mention. I'm been blessed by being around not only amazingly talented people but also amazing good people. For me that's more important.

Getting to work with Andrew J. West, Josh McDermott and Anne Dudek on Middle Man was an unexpected treat. I didn't know any of them and they came with their A games. Really amazing people and actors. :)

A:

Got a father-daughter build planned :)


Q:

You're usually better off on the website. It's generally the fastest, even if you pay more.

A:

We just really wanted to do production from Seattle, where we lived. And I guess the stars were aligned with 1) we were out of work 2) Newsweek just came out with a cover title "US kids 17th in Math and Science around the World" 3) there was an educational mandate for math and science So we thought hey lets do a science show with Bill....and 4 years later an overnight success. (eg)


Q:

Was the cast of Parks and Rec overly nice to you off camera to make up for how Jerry was treated on camera?

A:

What is the one video you regret making?


Q:

Did you primarily do business in sports or theater sales where you were located? Always wondered what these jobs entailed, to be honest.

A:

"Eat your crust Richie" is still one of my favorite quotes of all time.

How do you feel knowing that whenever the big tube tv was rolled into a science classroom, everyone in the room knew that we were going to watch the Science Guy, and we were all over the moon?


Q:

I wouldn't say overly nice. We were all just good friends doing good work and laughing our asses off every day. :)

A:

I don't regret making the video where we simulated Ryzen 5 performance, but I regret titling it in a deceptive manner..

Other than that the only video I've ever actually taken down was a detailed tour of my house. I was trying to show the reception issues with some early ASUS tablet and had inadvertently shown a lot of personal details that didn't belong on the Internet.

I'm also still not sure how I feel about some of the videos that feature my kids. They LOVE making videos with Daddy (especially my son) and they only appear once in a while so I don't think I'm going to be destroying their lives or anything, but they're also too young to really understand what it means to be on the Internet, so I don't know how they'll feel about that down the line.


Q:

Our venue did music and comedians mostly. Before we renovated a few years back we'd have amateur MMA live, which was interesting, but also tricky to handle since the theater wasn't designed for that sort of setup (since all the seats are on one side and whatnot).

The stage was actually enormous, which gives a lot of room for some of the real showmen that have come through (Alice Cooper, Empire of the Sun, and KISS come to mind) to work with cool set designs.

A:

Like a proud momma! That is one of my favorite quotes as well as is "keeping shaking science guy the sapphires fall to the bottom" (eg)


Q:

Who smells better, Chris Pratt or Rob Lowe?

A:

Is there something that you have always wanted to do on YouTube (maybe as a fun challenge) but didn't really fit on any of your channels so you decided against it?


Q:

That's pretty cool...sounds like a neat venue for specialty events. Amateur MMA? That must have taken some logistics to get right as you alluded to...wonder how the turnout was.

A:
  1. How did you guys meet Bill?
  2. What is something you enjoyed during your two week stay in Japan? (Awesome pic by the way!)
  3. How tricky was it to incorporate and properly balance humor into the show without it getting in the way of educating?
  4. Who or what would you say have had the most influence on you and what you do?

Thanks for the ama, guys. And thanks so much for co-creating such a wonderful and informative show.


Q:

This is definitely the most important question I will answer today. The answer is Rob Lowe. I only say that because he has his own fragrance line and it would make sense that he smells better than the rest of us. :)

A:

LOTS of things... If I ever stop making tech videos, you'll see them.


Q:

The turnout was alright for awhile, although they stopped working with us after the renovation. Dunno if they found a better place or what, but I don't mind. Those shows went on for hours and someone had to stick around till the last fight started so I was usually getting out after midnight.

A:
  1. At KING-TV, we worked together.
  2. The food. Jim went to one of the baths with one of our hosts and enjoyed it so much he went back the next morning and didn't realize (couldn't read the sign in Japanese) that they switched the male and female areas and next thing I hear are ladies' screams....
  3. Yes, it was an effort to not have the education overwhelmed by the humor/entertainment. We did have one rule of the road that the science was always the science and no faking/drama.
  4. Probably my parents, even if I didn't want to admit it. (eg)

Q:

Who was your favourite director and actor that you've worked with?

A:

What was the average "convenience fee" for tickets there?


Q:

My favorite director was a guy who started as our editor on Parks. He had also worked on The Office. His name is Dean Holland. He really understood all of our characters and knew how to get the best out of us.

My favorite actor that I've worked with is too broad of a question. I've fallen in love with so many people I've worked with over the years. By "love" I mean I loved being around them. :)

A:

In person it was free, $3 extra per over the phone. Recently they added a $2.50 fee on top of that to everything, no clue why. Still dirt cheap in person.


Q:

How often do you pull a classic Jerry move?

Also: I remember seeing you in a Castle episode, and I swear it was the most amazing thing I've ever seen, as I decided that your character (who was a butcher with anger management issues, if I recall correctly) was Jerry Gergich trying to process everything he was put through in Parks and Rec.

A:

How do companies feel about scalpers?


Q:

LOL That's a great analogy. I'm not sure that's what I was thinking at the time but who knows?

As far as pulling classic Jerry moves....every day. We all do.

I won an Emmy last month and as I was walking up the steps to get the award I just kept thinking "don't fall...don't fall". If I had fallen it would have been another "Jerry" moment that I would hear about forever even though I won the award for a different show. lol :)

A:

I really don't know anything from the legal side of things, but from a sales side we can't really do much about it beyond saying "hey don't scalp around us". Once you bought a ticket from us, we were hands-off: what you do with it after that is up to you. When people asked me I would always always always recommend against buying from them since I only ever saw it when it went south and someone got scammed, but that's as much influence as we had on it. We're not just gonna not sell to someone, no matter what we think they might do with the tickets.


Q:

Would you rather fight 100 Aziz-sized Li'l Sebastians or 1 Li'l Sebastian-sized Aziz?

Credit to /u/GodDamnNameDoesNotFi for the tweak to my original question

A:

Have you ever done the water driving range at the GSR?


Q:

I've thought about this question many many times so credit for the question goes to me. ;) The answer is ... 1 Li'l Sebastian-sized Aziz. :)

A:

I haven't, golf was never really my thing. Went to the arcade as a kid and tried a bunch of the restaurants during my time there, though.


Q:

Hi Jim!

If you could be anything other than an actor, what would you be?

A:

What was the busiest day of the week at work?

What was the slowest hour of the week?

What was the busiest hour of the day at work?

What was the slowest hour of the day?


Q:

I thank God every day that the acting thing worked out. Otherwise I have no idea what I'd be doing. I guess because I'm a talker and a bit gregarious that I could have gone into sales but honestly I don't know. A lot of my family around me are in the trades...like pipe coverers and fitters. I'm too damn uncoordinated and lazy to do that so again...THANK YOU GOD FOR LETTING THIS WORK OUT!!!!! :)

A:

It varied a lot- show days were almost universally busy, whereas any day that wasn't within a few days of a show was slow as hell.

I had days where I didn't speak to another person all day long, and then I had show nights where I sold nonstop for hours straight and on-sales where we didn't stop selling until we closed.


Q:

Was the makeout-fest on Late Night planned between you and Aubrey or just improvisation?

A:

Was the turnover at the box office as bad as it was everywhere else at the GSR? Also, how did you feel about the horrible management?


Q:

Totally thought up by Aubrey during the last commercial break. My favorite part when watching the video is how the other cast members reacted when they realized what was happening.

Aubrey is a super funny person. She knew it wouldn't be funny to make out with Pratt or Scott. She knew it had to be with the old fat guy to get the real laugh. I was happy to oblige. :)

A:

Turnover at the box office isn't as bad as something like the front desk, which was nonstop and dealt with complaints and was high-visibility. As far as management, I liked my direct superiors a lot, but more than a couple steps up the chain I didn't really hear from anyone. That could be a whole lot worse, but it wasn't great either.


Q:

Hey Larry, what did you type into Altavista to get here?

A:

How often are you on Reddit and what are your favorite subreddits?


Q:

I typed "please bring me to a site on the interwebs called reddit that will let me answer questions". ;)

A:

Allllll the time, dude. This is a throwaway so I don't wanna be specific, but a lot of gaming subs.


Q:

What is your favorite pizza topping?

A:

Hey there fellow Reno area guy. What happened to the prop airplane from Hello Hollywood, Hello?


Q:

I get my pizza with sausage, onion, extra sauce and crispy. mmmmm Now I've got to have pizza today. :)

A:

It's still there, dude. Saw it a few days ago when we ate backstage for my little going away party.


Q:

Ask you anything, eh?

Okay. Let's put this question to bed: Is the reason that Gayle was with Jerry/Terry/Larry/etc., was because of his massive penis?

According to Dr. Harris (whom Chris Traeger said was literally the meanest person he's ever met), it's the biggest penis he's ever seen. I mean, he didn't even know if you had mumps. He forgot to look. He was distracted. By the largest penis. He had ever seen.

A:

Haha have any other acts used the plane in your tenure there?


Q:

YES! Put it to bed. ;)

A:

I think David Copperfield vanished it once, but that was before my time. These days it just sits backstage with some other old sets and stuff.


Q:

So how did GSR feel after Amy Schumer spent the first 15 minutes of her act talking shit about the venue?

For background: she was originally booked for their Grand Theater, which is one of the best venues in town. Then they decided to do renovations on the theater and they moved her to a convention room with ziptied dining chairs and a temporary stage.

A:

I can't speak for anyone but myself of course but man, I think she can go fuck herself. Heard from one of my bosses at the time that she was being an asshole to the people working at wardrobe and all that too.

I'm sure she's probably nice to some people but that was a pretty dickish thing to say.


Q:

Why?

A:

College.


Q:

What is/was your college major?

A:

Graphic design. Left this job for one in my field.


Q:

Before tickets go on sale to the public, what percentage of tickets are already sold off?

A:

It varies wildly depending on the show, location, venue, all sorts of stuff like that. I'm sure you don't need me to tell you that super popular acts sell out instantly.

From the angle of this specific venue, the casino and presales are what take the lion's share. Casino gets a couple hundred tickets at various price levels to offer their players based on their play rate (and I've seen players with an average daily wager rate from the single digits to the thousands), sometimes five or six hundred if it's a big show. Beyond that, our presales were pretty open so a lot of times the a good chunk of the front half would go before the on sale. At a guess, that means about thirty percent of a theater seating about 2500-2700.


Q:

When does the buffet have crab legs? I forget.

A:

Fridays iirc


Q:

Hey man, thanks for doing this. I'm a little late to the party but hoping you see this.. have a couple of questions.

1) What's to prevent people from using Ticketmaster as a "showroom" of sorts then converting to the venue's website and purchasing from there to avoid the Ticketmaster fees? Does Ticketmaster own the inventory or do they have exclusivity via the contract, etc. Could you shed some light here?

2) What's Ticketmasters opinion of the secondary market (stubhub, seatgeek, etc.)?

2a) Does Ticketmaster price to discourage resale? Or are they in collusion with the secondary market to maximize value to each channel?

3) Do you have an opinion of Nathan Hubbard? Think he probably predates you but he seems to understand the pain consumers go through when acquiring tickets (although he didn't really do too much about it).

4) Final request - give me your insider's-opinion on how we fix this market for the consumer.

A:

Hey! I can't really comment on too much of this since I worked for a venue, not for Ticketmaster themselves, but I'll answer what I can.

1) Back when we were using our own in-house system we recommended doing this. Their online map looked better than ours in some cases so we'd tell them to look at the map on Ticketmaster and then come to our site and buy them cheaper. Since we went to 100% Ticketmaster sales there's no difference except fees. As far as I was aware we still owned the inventory the whole time, they just worked as a third party for us early on and later became our distribution mechanism. Our contracts and promotions were (again as far as I was aware) between us and the talent, unless they had an outside promoter like JMAX or Another Planet or something.

2) No clue. My own personal opinion is that the whole system is pretty fucked, but I wouldn't know the first thing to do to fix it.

2a) No clue, I never really got insight into why prices were set to what they were.

3) Never heard of him before now, to be honest.

4) See 2, I'd much rather leave that issue to people with more passion and expertise in the subject than myself.


Q:

So I read that the whole idea of Ticketmaster is to throw extra fees on and take the pressure off of the artist or venue. For example. Better for your favorite singer to charge $50 a ticket with Ticketmaster throwing on $20 in fees as compared to $65 for the ticket and $5 for the fees. Their whole model is to take the ire of the fans off of the artist/venue. That is why they don't have competition. Have you heard this, do you know if it is true?

A:

I have heard that, yeah, but it wasn't really true for our venue (max fee total outside of online was $5.50) so I don't really know how accurate it is, sorry.


Q:

What hours of the day did you work?

How many hours did you work per week?

A:

Swing/night shift for three years, then morning for the last year. Given that my new job is normal business hours, I'm glad I had time to adapt.

I was part time, but for awhile we were really understaffed, so I did more hours including a lot of overtime pretty frequently.


Q:

How often do you get to Lake Tahoe and the Ski Slopes nearby?

A:

Not at all, honestly. I'm not a very outdoorsy person. Tons of people come through the casinos for that stuff, though.