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Request[AMA Request] Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the Labour Party

Jun 14th 2017 by swirlyglasses1 • 35 Questions • 1369 Points

Dr. Hynek spent some 20 years debunking UFO reports for the Air Force, until he realized that there was something real going on, and that UFOs were worthy of serious scientific study. I’ve spent the past five years researching Dr. Hynek’s dual careers as a prominent astronomer and pioneer in celestial imaging and as a world-renowned UFO researcher, and have come to share his beliefs that the UFO phenomenon represents a new aspect of reality, and needs to be studied.

Proof: https://i.redd.it/2fvpv49zmiyy.jpg

Q:

"Hi Chris - huge fan of your book! I am interviewing for a few different companies and was wondering if you have any good questions/advice for salary negotiation?

A:

Do you spend an inordinate amount of time explaining to people that UFOs are not necessarily space ships from planet x and that they are actually, in fact unidentified flying objects?


Q:

2 questions you've GOT to ask.

1 - "What does it take to be successful here?" 2 - "How can I be guaranteed to involved in projects critical to the strategic future of the company?"

These are both "success" questions that set you up for more salary now, but even more importantly, in the future.

For #1 - You want to hear from the insiders (your interview panel) how to best get ahead. This will also recruit them as unofficial mentors as they will want to see you succeed as a result of their advice.

For #2 - The sets you apart as being a team player who want to make everyone succeed, therefore making you worth more, not just now but in the future. If you get this term it will also give you visibility at the highest levels of the company.

These both put you in a position to not only ask form more, but politely turn them down when they don't give you enough, and makes them waht to come up to your salary needs.

A:

Yes, that is pretty much unavoidable! People always ask the wrong questions.


Q:

Thank you. Great advice...if you have time, I've noticed companies always asking me what I currently make or what I am comfortable with - do you recommend "forcing" them to offer/describe compensation first? Curious on your thoughts.

A:

Lol, myself included! Thank you for your work and open mind.


Q:

Wow, that is THE question that everyone dreads in every salary negotiation.

There's an old saying in negotiation that "He or she who names price 1st loses" and salary is the price term in a job negotiation. The real saying is that "He or she who names price before gathering any information from the other side loses".

You've got to gather more information 1st. How? Several ways.

"Are you fishing or making me an offer?" "It sounds like you have a range in mind?" "Before I answer that, I'm sure you have criteria for determining salary ranges?" "How am I supposed to answer that?" "I can answer that, but before I do, that's not what I'm worth now and I would never switch jobs without a significant raise."

ALL of these need to be said with deference and respect. You can choose one or all of them depending on what suits your style and the context.

Please bear in mind the salary question is part of a larger test of how you handle pressure and may be intentionally low to see how you react.

It may also be immovable. It's still a test of whether or not you can respectfully explore an issue without cutting off the negotiation.

There is always space and time to clarify. You may need to name a number first, but not until after you're had a chance to ask more questions and gather more information, as long as you do it respectfully.

A:

Really, that deserves a more thoughtful reply! It's not that the question is so wrong, it's that it sometimes elicits the wrong kind of answer! Does that make more sense?


Q:

What are one or two easy bits of negotiating advice you'd recommend everyone employ in their day-to-day interactions?

A:

Absolutely!


Q:

1 - Let the other person go 1st!

There's a decent chance they'll say something you like. If they don't they'll at least appreciate the chance to have their say.

Then, make sure you summarize what they've said back to them. You know you've said it right when they say "That's right". Don't try to make your points until after they've said "That's right".

If they say "You're right" - that's actually code for "Please stop talking & leave me alone". You're on the wrong track.

You get a "That's right" out of someone you will ALWAYS get something you want out of the deal. You may need to add in "What do you want to do?" or "How can we proceed from here?" but something good will always happen. You've just got to let the process work for you.

A:

Even the subtitle of my book, "How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOS" commits that sin, but it's worded in a way that seems to make the most sense to the most people. It's a trap!


Q:

Did anyone asked for pizza during hostage situation like TV taught us? Can you tell us about some really tough hostage situation with a good ending?

A:

So sneaky its almost wrong.


Q:

Yep! As nuts as it sounds, sometimes they do. Not a bad sign as it may likely show they are giving some rational thought to their actions and may be engaged in some sort of predictable planning thought process.

I negotiated a bank robbery with hostages in Brooklyn. Though it happens on TV all the time, in real life, where there's actually a negotiation, it's pretty rare (usually, even if they take hostages, they get out of there before the police arrive).

Anytime people are help a gunpoint in a bank, you never know if the bank robber is actually orchestrating a deadly outcome. The negotiation team was comprised of both FBI Agents and NYPD Hostage Negotiators. It was like an All-star team and the NYPD guys were really, really good.

Because we played a strong "team game" - everyone helping everyone else listen - in any conversation there's just too much for 1 person to take in - we got everyone out safely.

During the course of the negotiation, I was handed notes 2 different times that gave me clues to prefect things to say. Both of those notes were right-on and were picked up by me colleagues who were listening intently.

That was a cool day.

A:

When ppl asked Hynek if he believed "UFOs were real", he would say, "I know UFO reports are real!"


Q:

Do you have any "non-hostage rescue" related negotiating advice?

A:

What is the strangest thing you discovered in your research?


Q:

Lots of them! Mostly with me negotiating myself out of a jam!

I’m about to miss a flight out of Malaysia on my way to Australia. I’m facing an immigration line to leave the country that looks every bit of 40 minutes long and my flight boards in 20 minutes. The breakdowns that have caused me to get in this position were all under my control or oversight.

I cut the line (of 40 people) to the Malaysian government bureaucrat who is taking his time and likely not impressed with the selfish concerns of an American who’s failed to get out in front of his schedule.

Me: “I am so sorry. I’m afraid I’m late. My flight boards in 20 minutes and if you don’t let me through I’m going to miss my flight.”

Him: “Why were you late?” (Unsmiling – He is also looking at the next guy in line that I have jumped in front of and clearly thinking about sending me to the back.)

Me: “It was completely my fault. I’m probably going to be the stupidest person you talk to today.” (What do you think he was thinking at that moment? FBI Empathy /Tactical empathy to the rescue.)

Him: (What is he now thinking? “That’s right.” He smiles, reaches for my passport and ticket – stamps them) “Have a nice flight.”

Later that week I’m delayed in the TSA security checkpoint at Newark Airport. They’ve snagged me because I’ve left a few ounces of water in my “Voss” water bottle in my carry-on shoulder bag. I want to keep the bottle because it’s “Voss”! (and it also has a larger opening to pour in the bizarre vitamins I take.)

The TSA guy is giving me sideways glare/glances as he’s got several bags to check & would clearly rather be doing something else. I smile. No smile in return.

He walks over to get my bag, and when he picks it up I say, “Bless me father for I have sinned.”

His expression remains unamused.

He takes 3 steps towards me to walk me to the table where he’ll open the bag and says. “How long since your last confession my son?”

“An hour. I do a lot of things wrong.”

He lets me drink the rest of the water in front of him (they’re supposed to throw it out), personally walks me back to the front of the security line (once again cutting in front of 40 people – they’re just supposed to expel you back outside the secure area) and makes sure I get on my way with only momentary delay.

This FBI empathy stuff works!

A:

That Steven Spielberg accidentally stole the title of "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" from Dr. Hynek


Q:

I loved the book. There is an audiobook format for those who are interested.

Questions:

  • Does Al Pacino impersonate you, or do you impersonate him?
  • Which negotiation by you, or others went the most sideways? The airline hijacking in the book comes to mind, but I'm interested to hear others.
A:

What is the strangest thing you discovered in your research?


Q:

Al Pacino?! "Heat" was awesome right? What about Christopher Walken?

The Burnham/Sobero case in the Philippines (I talk about it in the book). 2 out of our 3 Americans and several Filipinos died. Terrible tragedy. But we didn't let any of those deaths be in vain. We learned, we got better. Lives were saved in later cases because of how we got better there.

We used the intel we gathered in the case to bring justice to the kidnappers. The US system of justice has a long memory. That's why we have indictments and that's what the FBI does best.

A:

The info is on P. 81. The photo analysts discounted birds because of the illumination of the objects. They were light sources!


Q:

In a situation where you and your counterpart are aware there is no urgency to make a decision (specifically in sales when prices won't change) how do you create urgency to get your customer to make a decision?

A:

Thanks for doing this AMA. Most people think UFOs actually are identifiable and belong to the US government. What is something about UFOs that most of us would be shocked to find out?


Q:

That's a cool question! It speaks to not only what motivates people, but what holds them back when they're indecisive. People hold themselves back when they imagine outcomes of things not working out. They compare several possible "imagined" futures.

The real comparison if what will happen if they do nothing. That's what you use the negotiation skills, whether you use labels or calibrated questions (open-ended - usually "what" or "how") questions to get them to see the results of their inaction. And they need to see it over longer term and not just the immediate.

"What will happen if you don't do (or buy) this?" "Will the issue you're addressing go away or will in slowly increase?" "How will your inaction affect you long term?" "What will you lose by not doing (or buying) this?"

People are also much more motivated by loss avoidance, then by the prospect of gain (This is "Prospect Theory" and it won a Nobel Prize for Behavioral Economics it's so true). So they are more likely to buy something if it will keep them from a loss, as opposed to technically making them better off.

A:

That many UFOs seem to be both physical and non-physical at the same time


Q:

How DO men and women negotiate differently? Do women need to approach negotiation differently? As a woman, I feel like I do.

A:

Can you expand on that a little? When you say non-physical, you mean like those beams of light that car dealerships shine at the night sky?


Q:

Are you kidding me?!

I think women are naturally BETTER negotiators!!!

Men are perceived by the business world to be more willing to ask for what they want, to set limits on what they'll accept or to say "no" and walk away.

Women are perceived by they business world to be more relationship focused which tends to allow more tolerance for the sake of the relationship when the negotiation is perceive to be putting the relationship at stake.

I think all elements mentioned above are necessary and I think women show more inclination to the tactical empathy based negotiation I teach. I've got a number of very strong success stories of women being successful as a result of using what I and my company teaches and the success stories are in greater percentages that the percentage of women we've taught.

A:

It's like how light behaves both as a wave and a particle simultaneously... It can't be but it is. I can't describe it much better than that.


Q:

What are your thoughts on Trump?

A:

This didn't sound weird to me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdFdpR4JsnQ


Q:

Wow! That's a potentially "hot-button" question!

President Trump is the classic example of the openly aggressive and assertive negotiator.

He may be the best, if not the most well known example of this type.

There are 3 types (if my opinion as well as my colleagues in my company and most of my Harvard Law School teaching colleagues).

The other 2 types are Analyst (Harvard calls them "Avoiders") and Accommodators. These are essentially fight, flight or make friends.

The Assertives as a type tend to roll up a number of big successes and then people get worn out by being attacked all the time and feeling like everything is a fight, and stop making deals with them.

I'm a natural born assertive and have had this same problem.

It's been a very long time since Donald Trump did anything in New York City that rivals the scale of his successes from the 1980's and 1990's. He owned the westside rail yards in Manhattan for years and wanted to put of the world's tallest building there. It never happened.

Privately (as opposed to publicly) when he sits down with people, he seems to work things out. Currently the level of cooperation with the US & China regarding North Korea is unprecedented.

There are some real shortcomings in negotiation for all of us, not matter which one of the types we are naturally. Each type has attributes that are necessary t make great deals. If we can learn them, we've all got tremendous upside potential.

A:

Watch it all, it's truly awesome!


Q:

A "what" question.

A:

share his beliefs that the UFO phenomenon represents a new aspect of reality, and needs to be studied

What do you mean? Can you expand on this statement pls?


Q:

Ahhhh! Good observation grasshopper!

You think they wanted me to say President Trump is a big scardy-cat?

A:

It can encompass psychic aspects, or aspects of physical reality that are at present beyond our ability to comprehend


Q:

Do you miss the hostage negotiation days with the FBI? I'm sure it was very rewarding although extremely stressful...

A:

Favorite Star Trek episode?


Q:

I don't miss it because I love this so much now. Putting this stuff to work in the business world and in people's everyday lives is awesome! I'm helping people make their lives better and helping them bring better lives to their families.

As far as the stress back then? I felt it was a privilege to do the work. It was my mission at the time. My purpose. Read Daniel Pink's book "Drive". He talks about that kind of thing.

Among the things I've been doing lately is working with real estate agents. They are doing so much more to support their clients in the sale of their homes, one of the most stressful things you can go through (short of a kidnapping). It's very cool. A new purpose for me.

A:

Outside the ones I wrote, you mean?


Q:

Cool, thanks for doing this.

In one of the finest movies to ever grace a screen, 1998's poignant 'The Negotiator', who was the better negotiator in your opinion: Keven Spacey or Samuel L Jackson?

A:

Yes


Q:

The character as written overall for Kevin Spacey was better (with a couple of exceptions - negotiators are never in charge - decisions don't go through them). Samuel Jackson as a good guy backed into a corner was a better hostage taker!

We used to use several clips from that movie as teaching points. One we always loved was where the Samuel Jackson character is "schooling" the less talented hostage negotiator to not say "no" as an outright rejection. If you google it, it's hysterical!

A:

From the original series, The Changeling and The Doomsday Machine


Q:

What negotiating tactics can I use to convince my girlfriend that having 5 house cats is enough, and we don't need to add anymore?

Bonus points if she will still talk to me after said negotiation.

A:

Good choices


Q:

My friend, the most dangerous negotiation is the one you don't know you're in!

This isn't about house cats. It's about her security and how she see's the world. There are things that are driving her that she is afraid to share with you (hidden) and there are things driving her that are so far in the past she may have forgotten them (blind).

You're dig into this with labels: "It seems like what the cats give you is important to you." "It seems you had cats growing up?" "It feels to you lke there's something missing in your life?" "It feels like having the cats helps you control things in the world that are otherwise out of control."

If you can dig into what's driving her, you may be able to diffuse it, or find another way to address it.

If you are really trying to understand, she won't only be speaking to you afterward, she's likely to feel much closer to you as well.

Good luck!

A:

Thanks. What's your fave?


Q:

Can anybody learn to be a negotiator or are specific aptitudes required?

A:

Is there anyone presently in the UFO related field who you feel is doing particularly excellent scientific work?


Q:

ANYBODY can learn it if they want to. The most important attribute is what's called "openness" just because you are more "open" to learning. But if you're working at it and trying, you're "open" right? At lease enough to put in the effort.

Great negotiation is about great emotional intelligence or EQ. We've all got it and the good news, unlike IQ, is that EQ can be built and improved on until your mid 80's at least.

IQ is like your height. There is only so tall you are ever going to get and not matter how much chess you play, or rubics cubes you spin around, you're never going to lift you IQ past a certain point. As a kid I wanted to be 6'7" tall and be a pro-basketball player. my dad was 5'10" (he lied to me when I was little and always told me he was 6'0 - he told my son the same story but I think he told him he was 6'2"). Not matter have many gallons of milk I drank (lots) I only got to 6'.

Anyway, with practice, effort and openness you can become a great negotiator. A real key is listening for motivations and one of the best ways to get really good at that is volunteering on a suicide hotline. You'll be amazed at the EQ you can pick up doing that!

Buy a couple of different negotiation books, besides mine, Stuart Diamond's book "Getting More" is really good and so is Jim Camp's book "Start With No".

Get some practice in lots of little day-to-day conversations and you can get really good.

Good luck!

A:

Well, that's a trick question you see... I'm not sure if "scientific" work applies to UFO research anymore!


Q:

Would you rather fight 1 horse sized duck or 100 duck sized horses?

A:

If we can get a person on Mars, how do you think we'll do it?


Q:

Are you crackers?

A:

Didn't we already send Matt Damon? Seriously check out the work of Robert Zubrin. He's got it all figured out!


Q:

Its a question everyone on reddit who does an ama gets asked

A:

Do you suspect any one on Earth is an extraterrestrial?


Q:

Then I should have said "Are you quackers?!?"

A:

If extraterrestrials are as worried about us as they probably should be, it would make sense for them to have some moles infiltrating our society. I certainly don't think they'd be here by choice.


Q:

Chris, how do I get past a bouncer at a busy club?

A:

What if one had a last name that rhymes w/ Busk?


Q:

Tip included. As you're walking up to him, say "I am so sorry. I found this."

You're either holding up a $20 or a $100, depending on the club. Tear it in half right in front of him. Hand him half. Don't say another word.

He feels respected and in control. It's his option to let you in, or fail to collaborate & you both lose equally. Given that amount of control, if he was EVER going to let you in, that will do it.

Peace!

A:

Hmmm... if the name begins with "M" that would be a likely candidate. He would fit the profile of the God-like benevolent alien.


Q:

Chris, what items for sale and services can people negotiate the price for that 95% of people have no idea that those prices are negotiable and could you give us a short example on what to say to negotiate the price?

A:

you're picking up what I'm putting down, my man.


Q:

Nearly everything is negotiable, if the person you're dealing with just feels like it. Consider this phrase - "Never be mean to someone who could hurt you by doing nothing". That pretty much covers everyone you deal with right?

If everyone could hurt you, then by the same token, they can help you if they just feel like it. The trick is how to get them there? How to get them to give you the "employee" discount that they give to their friends ALL the time.

I (we) call this "The Chris Price". It the "(Your name) Price". Here some examples and what's behind it:

As a hostage negotiator, I know that getting a hostage taker to use the hostage’s name humanizes the hostage and makes it less likely they will come to harm. This process is what we in The Black Swan Group now refer to as “forced empathy.” It makes the other side see you, and see you as a person.

A few years ago I was in a bar in Kansas with a number of other FBI hostage negotiators. The bar is really packed with lots of people having a good time. There’s an empty chair at the bar. As I get ready to sit in there the guy next to it says “Don’t even think about it”.

So...I say “Why?” He says “Because I’ll kick your ass.” I hesitate a moment, sort of shrug and scratch my head and say “Well...I don’t need that.”

I hold out my hand to shake his. “My name is Chris.” He freezes.

The hostage negotiators with me quickly move in, pat him on the shoulders, greet him warmly and offer to buy him a drink.

Conversation ensues and we find out he’s a Vietnam veteran at a particularly low point in his life. He’s sitting there in misery while he “perceives” that everyone around him is having a wonderful time. The only thing he can think of is to fight someone.

When I was some unnamed person he was ready to hit me. As soon as I became “Chris” everything changed.

Getting a Discount in an Outlet Mall

Flash forward in time, I’m in an outlet mall. I pick out some shirts in one of the stores. I go to the front counter and the young lady behind the counter asks me if I want to join their frequent buyer program. (This is of course, I think, a way for them to get my e-mail address so they can spam my inbox.) I ask her if it costs me anything. She says “no”.

I ask her if I get a discount for joining. She says “no”. So I say in a friendly manner “My name is “Chris”. What’s the “Chris” discount?”

She says “I’ll have to ask my manager.” She turns to the other woman who’s been standing next to her the whole time and says “Kathy, he wants to know if there is a “Chris” discount.”

Kathy says “The best I can do is 10%.”

Another Discount

A couple of weeks later I’m in a clothing store shopping for a cummerbund (I know how it sounds, okay? I’m sorry but I needed one.) I also try on a bunch of shirts and don’t buy any of them (which always makes me feel guilty). I check out the price for the cummerbund and it looks a little high to my unsophisticated eye. So I tell the guy I’ll be back, and I walk out the front door. (I feel lame doing that, especially since I figure the sales guy thinks “That’s nonsense. That guy’s not coming back”.)

I shop every other store in the mall and find all prices higher than the first. I know I have to go back there. I hate it every step of the way, because I know soon as I walk in the front door they know they’ve got me. I walk in and both of the salesmen are standing right there and they say “Yes, we’ve got your cummerbund right here.”

Now of course there is a sign in front of this clothing store saying “Buy 1 Shirt, Suit or Sport coat and get 3 free!”. This tells my consumer mind that maybe there’s some leeway here in the pricing. I say “Hey, buy 1 get 3 free?”

They say “No, no, no, that’s not on cummerbunds, that’s shirts, suits and sport coats.” I say “Yeah, because what am I going to do with 3 cummerbunds?

So there’s no discount on cummerbunds?”

And they say, “No. No discounts on cummerbunds.” I then playfully say...“But I’m “Chris”, there has to be a “Chris” discount. What’s the “Chris” price?”

And the manager says... “The best I can do is 20%.”

Use your name to introduce yourself. Say it in a fun, friendly way. Let them enjoy the interaction too. Get the “Chris” price. Get the “(your name)” price.

A:

I wish he'd share cooler tech with us, though. What's he saving the good stuff for? I'm talking limitless clean energy, immortality, the works!


Q:

Are you going to write any more books? If so, what would they cover?

A:

I think it is fair to say that UFO research as a field has a credibility problem in many people's minds. Is there something you feel people should or shouldn't be doing to attract the right/avoid the wrong kind of attention?


Q:

Not yet but here are some ways to both get some free stuff and stay ahead of anything we publish!

My colleagues and I in The Black Swan Group (Derek Gaunt and Brandon Voss) keep putting out articles in our weekly newsletter "The Edge". Both Derek & Brandon write powerful stuff (and the newsletter is free).

At some point, both Derek and Brandon will probably publish e-books under our company's umbrella.

In a couple of years, we'll likely update "Never Split the Difference" but in the meantime, most of the ideas that would be in that update will come up in some way or another in our newsletter "The Edge". If you're interested you can find it on our website www.blackswanltd.com or you can text message the number 22828 with the message "FBIEmpathy" (all one word - don't let your autocorrect change it - under upper or lower case letters don't matter).

Much of the newer stuff we're writing about now focuses on what we refer to as "cold-reads", other aspects of tactical empathy and "proof-of-life of the deal" and it's not just proof-of-life of the deal, but proof-of-life of the deal with YOU. Not the same thing.

A:

Stop going to UFO conferences and events that feature the same tired old UFO "experts" talking about the same tired old topics. Avoid anyone who claims to have a "smoking gun."


Q:

How did find your career path, and how did you find the confidence to negotiate?

A:

Thanks for taking the time to do this.

Do you have any reading recommendations for these different "vibrations" or dimensions?

"Spaceships" have always seemed silly to me just because space is too vast - but if you can step outside of space/time, that opens a lot of possibilities. But it seems to me those possibilities wouldn't involve complex machinery so much as a methodology to step outside of space-time since that's the real thing holding real "travel" back.

Who are current authors/books that have explored these ideas?

I'm not familiar with ufology so forgive me if this is common knowledge but it seems like we have very little recent footage of unusual flying objects and when we do get footage it's often sorted out. With all of the cameras out there today it would seem that phenomena should follow the same pattern as the weather. For example, there aren't really more tornadoes than in the past, but we see a LOT more because there are more people - with more cameras, in more areas. Are you aware of any resources that show high quality videos that are recent - and "unexplainable"? (I know people are tricky and have access to lots of editing tools). I've seen more recent videos of strange lights over cities - from a distance but honestly - they just aren't that good. I would expect something.... more with all of the people/cameras out there these days

The Tremonton movie is interesting but still old and poor quality.

Thanks again for taking the time - and your great writing!


Q:

Cop - FBI Agent - FBI Agent Swat - FBI Terrorism Investigator - FBI Hostage Negotiator.

I had an old knee injury that was flaring back up when I was with FBI SWAT. I knew we had negotiators, I didn't really know what they did or how complex it might be, but I figured "I talk to people all the time. I can talk to terrorists!"

It ended up being more amazing than SWAT ever was. I was told if I wanted to to it, I needed to go volunteer at a suicide hotline. I did it. That was the best piece of advise I ever got for any kind of negotiation.

The training is great and your EQ if you pay attention of through-the-roof. It's also a perishable skill.

Once you know how this stuff works, you've got all the confidence you need. All you have to do is practice. And you can try it at home!

A:

All good questions. Again, my reading pics would start with "The Edge of Reality" by Hynek and Vallee, and then Jung's UFO book. We're really dealing with the formation of mythology before our very eyes, I think, so it's hard to know where and when to begin examining the phenonenon and how and where to end. It's being formed as we speak, in a sense.


Q:

Whats the best thing I can do to get a job with the FBI in the future?

A:

what convinced you that there was more to sci-fi?


Q:

There's a couple of simple things...DON'T GET ARRESTED! Don't use any drugs. (Maybe smoke a joint ONCE.) Stay clean, don't break the law.

It doesn't take any guts to break the law anyway. Outlaw?! Really. Boring. Going you own way legally, being totally your own person? That takes guts.

After that, you can give yourself an edge with military service (quick and easy way to already have a security clearance - shortens the time the FBI's got to do a background on you) go to law school, become an accountant or become fluent (reading and writing) in a couple of key languages (Arabic, Farsi, Spanish, Chinese, Russian to name some important ones).

The FBI is a cool job and it's got the perfect place for you somewhere no matter what type of person you are. Just work hard, show up and have fun!

A:

I think the fact that science fiction concepts and images have always exerted such a strong pull on world culture (and modern science) suggests that there's some basic urge among us humans to believe in weird, inexplicable things in the sky.


Q:

Another question: How do you detach yourself from the outcome of a negotiation?

Even in business scenarios, I find that I tie a certain amount of self-worth to the outcome of a negotiation and that tends to hinder me more often than not. I imagine that feeling is much more amplified when the stakes are higher in hostage scenarios. How would you emotionally remove yourself from the scenario and free yourself to focus on only the best outcome for everyone?

A:

What's your favorite kind of cheese 🧀?


Q:

Ah! Interesting question also!

Please allow me to shift your focus?

Focusing on the outcome gives you blinders. You'll miss better opportunities.

It's also a little like walking a tightrope. If the tightrope walker looks at her/his destination she/he falls off the rope. If they focus on each step they stay on.

Focus on the process. Have a "sense" of the outcome and then you will sense it as a better outcome begins to hint it's there.

Focus on how the other side is seeing things. There's an interesting thing that happens when you really turn your radar on to pick up where the other side is coming from. You get out of your own head and pick up their clues better. You read between the lines better. You "hack" their true meaning and motivators.

Then the deal emerges. Since it's impossible to know everything the other side is hiding (unless you discover it in the process) you can never know in advance what the best deal is.

Learn a great process, let yourself be imperfect and you'll make great deals.

A:

The kind the moon is made of, of course.


Q:

Looking forward to playing with this idea and frame of mind!

Thank you for your thoughtful responses. Would be happy to spring for a cocktail the next time you find yourself in Chicago!

A:

This is he best answer I have ever gotten to this question, hands down!


Q:

Thank you!

A:

it's the only answer there could possibly be!


Q:

What is your favourite dinosaur?

A:

Hi Mark, thanks for taking the time to do this ama. I will definitely check out Close Encounters Man. Sounds awesome! Thanks again. Onto the questions:

  1. What would you say has been the most hair raising thing you or Dr. Hynek found out while researching UFOs or reports?

  2. Do you believe in the Men in Black stories or think they're just made up to add fuel to the whole UFO / aliens phenomenon?


Q:

Vossaraptor!

A:

I love Men In Black stories! Not the Will & Tommy Lee kind of MIB, but the creepy, terrifying, strangely inhuman kind that harass and threaten UFO witnesses. The best account of those I've seen is John Keel's awesome book The Mothman Prophecies. I can't speak for Dr. Hynek, but the most hair-raising thing I've come across as a UFO investigator was a local family with a history of paranormal experiences and a very real, inexplicable link to one of the famous "saucer crash" myths that was very likely an Army psyops scam. That one still gives me goosebumps!


Q:

Who is your favourite Beatle?

A:

Where did you get that thing on your shoulder? If I remember correctly, it's from an episode of Twilight Zone (though it may have been Outer Limits). That scared the bejeezus out of me as a kid.


Q:

Me!

No seriously...Paul. Super cool guy. Pops up in LA now & then (where I'm at now). He pulled a super-cool "negotiation" move with a friend of mine.

My buddy (who's also a musician) see's Paul jogging in a park in the Hollywood Hills. My friend tries not to be a giddy fan, but can't help it & runs after him & catches up. My buddy is almost beside himself that he actually standing there talking to Paul McCartney. He's so excited he can't hardly speak & Paul reaches over to him & puts his hands on his shoulders. Then his says "Yeah, I say that TV show too. It was cool" My buddy had mentioned a Beatles related show that had just been on.

With that touch, Paul then turned & went back to his jog. Totally cool way to give a great fan an amazing moment with complete class & then get back to his day!

A:

My brother Matt & best sister-in-law Casey got for that for me for my birthday a while back. It is a "Zanti Misfit" from The Outer Limits, and it's scary as hell!


Q:

Ha! I knew it! I was actually a little upset at Matt for buying it. He was so excited, though.

A:

You broke cover!


Q:

Have you been inspired while writing this book to do some UFO hunting yourself??

A:

Yes, I worked as an investigator for the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) from 2011 to just recently. I've investigated about 150 sightings, and of those about 25 were just too weird and perplexing to be explained. At least by me.


Q:

Who actually does mourn for Morn?

A:

Everyone!


Q:

I love the books by Sergej lukianenko. Apart from that I think Metro 2033 is pretty amazing.

A:

I don't know much about video games, but the author sure looks interesting. I'll have to check out his work.


Q:

The game you found is an Adaption of the book. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metro_2033

A:

That looks cool.


Q:

A question to another topic: How did you come to write for startrek?

A:

I had a good agent and I got lucky! In the early 1990s, the producers of Star Trek: The Next Generation were pretty liberal about looking at scrips from outside writers, so I wrote a script, my agent got it in the door, and in time they called me in to pitch story ideas. It took about 2 years of trying, but they kept inviting me to try again so I kept at it until I pitched the right story concept to the right producer on the right day and made the sale!


Q:

Not really a paradox - it's a problem with the whole alien narrative.

A:

Not sure I follow.


Q:

Hi - have you ever listened to what William Cooper said about aliens? He said he discovered alien evidence in his work for the government. At first he thought it was real. Later he realized it was planted in order to convince him it was real. He said we will encounter aliens, but when we do, it will be our own government fooling us into funding the weaponization of space.

He also said, in 2010 -- just watch, the next major event the next terrible thing to come down the road, just watch, you can be sure that it will be blamed on Osama bin Laden.

A:

I'm not familiar with William Cooper, but he's certainly not alone in pushing the government cover-up theory!


Q:

I'm very surprised to see this book here -- one of my favorites -- thanks for doing it!

I really enjoyed the book's depictions of interactions with law enforcement. Where did the inspiration for Sheriff Mason McKinley come from? Was he a composite character, or really someone from past experiences?

A:

I have no idea who "Sheriff Mason McKinley" is. Can you elaborate?


Q:

Yeah, he is a man of mystery I suppose. It is better that you don't explain.

A:

He's not the first human to have intimate relations with an alien.