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ScienceI am theoretical neuroscientist Dr. Edward Large, and I pioneered the theory that the brain entrains its oscillations to acoustic rhythms. Using recent discoveries, I invented a new way to visualize music.

Jun 29th 2017 by edlarge3 • 15 Questions • 933 Points

I am a survivor of a school shooting.

My name is Meaghan. I attended Marysville Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Washington from 2013-2015. I was born and raised in Washington state, before eventually moving to Charleston, South Carolina at the end of my Sophomore year.

The shooting happened during my Sophomore year. School was somewhat enjoyable at best for me, I never really liked school or even the social aspect of it. I constantly begged my parents to let me do online school, more so after the shooting though.

Despite all that, the kids I went to school with were people I grew up with, people that I had once made a connection with in the past. We were a pretty small community. I also had a solid group of friends at the time that I still talk to today. My classes weren't bad either, although geometry was a huge struggle. I liked my teachers, we were all pretty close. My school was laid back, not too tight on the rules and everyone generally got along pretty well.

The morning of the shooting was like any other. Wake up 10 minutes before school, my brother yelling up the stairwell telling me to get my ass in the car or he'd leave me. We lived about a mile from the school, so the ride was fairly short. We were probably listening to some shitty rap song as we zig-zagged across speed bumps and screeched into the parking lot a couple of minutes before class. I rushed to first period, English 2 Honors, and plopped down in my seat, late as always.

I don't remember that morning being much different from any other, class was the same as always. I trudged onto second period, some sort of computer class. That class wasn't interesting so I never paid much attention. Then third period, health class with one of my favorite teachers. Again, a normal day.

Our classes were shortened, since it was a half day. Our school had half days every Friday due to budget cuts. We weren't exactly the wealthiest community. After third period I had first lunch, I walked into the "small" lunchroom around 10:00 A.M and sat down, talking to my boyfriend at the time on the phone. My friends didn't have first lunch that day, so I sat alone, blabbering on the phone.

If I remember correctly around 10:20 A.M, the fire alarm went off. Everyone evacuated the building as expected. I remember laughing with one of my brothers friends, joking about how it was probably one of the seniors pulling a prank. Then I heard a bang. It sounded pretty far off, so I didn't think about it. Then I heard more... that was when fear finally settled in.

It all happened within a matter of minutes. At 10:24 A.M the first shot happened. I remember running like my life depended on it. I was aiming for the parking lot. A lot of my brothers friends were heading to their cars to leave, I so badly wanted to go with them. I wanted to go to safety. I wanted to go home.

I never made it to the parking lot. My limbs were heavy with the thought that someone I know might be dead. My heart hurt from beating so hard. I think I cried. I don't know. I just know that I was afraid. I still feel that fear today.

One of the Spanish teachers who shared a room with my first period teacher grabbed me so hard it knocked the wind out of me. I remember begging him to let me go, to let me go to my brothers friends. I had known them my whole life practically, they were my brothers too. I wanted my brothers to take me away from the horrific tragedy that had just occurred seconds ago.

He refused, and shoved me into the room and locked the door behind us. Standing there, in that room, the stench of fear was so tangible I still see it every fucking day. It was like my life was in slow motion. I scanned the room, kids were huddled in corners, shoved under desks. The air was so thick I thought I was choking. It felt like that room was 100 degrees. There was probably 50 or so students in a room meant for 25.

I found a spot under a large table right underneath the only window in that room. I looked to my left and there was a group of freshman girls huddled by the teachers desk. I remember one girl hysterically crying, swearing up and down that her best friend was dead. I think that's when It finally sunk in.

I smushed myself under that table between two guys I didn't know. I was still on my phone with my at-the-time boyfriend, and he swore up and down that he wouldn't hang up, that he would sit through this with me. Despite the disaster that relationship was, I will always remember him talking me through that entire experience and keeping me somewhat sane for the time being. I will forever appreciate that.

The texts finally started coming in from all of my family members. "Are you okay?" "Are you hurt?" I didn't really know how to respond, but I did. I was huddled under that desk for over two hours, watching the newscasts quietly with hushed voices thick with tears. The anxiety, the fear, that's all I could feel.

Finally, the police knocked on the door and demanded that we open up. They came in, guns raised and flipped on the lights. I remember standing up and covering my eyes only to be told to hold my hands high in the air. I trembled as a police man pointed his gun near me, my heart couldn't beat any faster in that moment. We were told to grab our cell phones only and to exit the room in a orderly, single filed line. We ran out of the room, flanked by policeman.

That first breath of fresh air wasn't refreshing. It was heavy, filled with sorrow and agony. We ran, and ran until we were escorted on a school bus and sent off to a church not far from the school. The ride there was a blur, and being there was one too. We had to sign our name in check in, and go out front to wait for our parents.

I'm not religious, but I do remember walking through that church and just hoping that someone would rid my body of the crippling anxiety I felt. It's still there, it never went away.

I hugged some of my teachers and cried with them, holding hands with people I hadn't spoken to in years and telling them that it'll all be okay. Eventually I was outside waiting for my mom behind a line of police tape. I saw her and she pulled me through the tape and hugged me so hard. I heard her sobs in my ear as she shook and petted my head. Her heart was absolutely broken, mine was too. I didn't know how to feel, I didn't cry with her, I wanted to. I just couldn't feel anymore. I lost a part of myself that day that I'll never get back.

We then retrieved my brother and my dad came to pick us all up, and we went home. At home I sat on the couch and watched the on-going news reports with my family. Nobody said a word. Later on that night I found out one of my childhood friend, Zoe, had died in the shooting. I didn't cry then either. I went up to my room and didn't come back out the rest of the night.

We had the next week off of school after the shooting. Our community really came together after everything. Nothing really helped my healing process though, it's still an on-going thing.

I now suffer from PTSD (diagnosed by a psycho-therapist). This shooting has affected my life in so many ways. Any loud noise sends my pulse skyrocketing. A book slamming on a desk, loud beeping sounds, alarms, fire trucks, police sirens, banging noises, all of this immediately sends me back to that initial moment when the fear struck me. I can't trust people.

The unpredictability of that day has forever traumatized me. I so badly want people in my life to understand that it's not their fault that I have an extremely hard time trusting. It’s not my fault. I am constantly hyper aware of my surroundings, I notice every little detail. My body is always tense, I don't know if I'll ever truly relax again. Anxiety is a daily thing, I'm not sure if it'll go away anytime soon.

I lost some of myself that day, and it was replaced with fear and anxiety and intense trust issues. As unfortunate as that is, it's who I am. I cannot tell you how many nights I have spent on the bathroom floor, crying, wheezing, hurting and just wishing that things were different. But they aren't, they never will be. The only thing I can do now is move forward.

I am a survivor of a school shooting.

I will always be afraid.

Proof:

Here is a picture of my school ID from that year ID

Here is a picture take by a news person of my mom hugging me after she found me mom and me

And here is a picture of me now holding my school ID me

Also here is the link to the Wikipedia article about the shooting. It's not proof, just added in case someone wanted to see it https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marysville_Pilchuck_High_School_shooting

Please leave any questions you have, I'd love to try and answer them.

Thank you.

Q:

Why does music have such an effect on humans? It's a human invention (not something that occurs in nature) and yet we are so fond of it.

A:

When you eat a steak does it also make you crave cock?


Q:

Nootropics is a very growing market. What are your thoughts on the use and/or the regulation of nootropics?

A:

[deleted]


Q:

When you first started Futurama, how many seasons did you think it would last?

A:

Like many show writers, do you already have plans for the "Final Gathering"?


Q:

I need a change of career, but I have no idea what I want to do, just that I want to do something else. What's your advice on seeking out a new career?

A:

Thank you for sharing this personal account. Do you think it was best that the teacher grabbed you and brought you to the room or would it have been better to keep running to the parking lot with your brother and his friends?


Q:

That's a great question. Recently we scientists have spent a lot of time researching exactly the question of the "musicality" of animals. You may have seen Snowball the dancing parrot, or Ronan the head-bobbing sea lion on You Tube. These animals appear to "get" the rhythm of music the way people do. More specifically, they can hear the beat in complex musical rhythms, like we do.

Also, the natural behavior of some animals, like rhythmic drumming of bonobos and the duetting of gibbons might be closely related to human musical behavior.

However, I do agree with you that music -- as we normally think of it --- is a human invention. Or perhaps not so much an invention as a discovery about the fundamental nature of how the brain responds to sound. That is where the theory of synchrony of neural oscillations comes in.

Our cortical simulations, essentially explain how people heat the beat in complex rhythms. Let's see if I can embed a link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJPBayI9x9k. However, at a faster time scale, we believe this theory will also explain the perception of pitch, consonance and dissonance, and tonality (perception of notes in a melody as stable or unstable). We have a number of papers on tonality already, and we are currently working on pitch and consonance.

A:

Not anymore


Q:

There are a host of chemical agents people consume with the goal of improving their cognitive function. It’s estimated that the sale of such drugs from improving cognition is a billion dollar a year business in the world. Most of these drugs and supplements induce the actions of natural neurotransmitters and modulate plasticity in ways that impact brain function. The drugs that are used off-label, designed to treat ADHD, are a case in point. A drug like Adderall is a stimulant that has the same general effects as the natural neurotransmitter, norepinephrine. There are about 20 chemical agents overall that are relatively well-known, distributed for sale and studied on some level, that are being sold in the nootropic marketplace. There is a significant body of evidence that at least some of these agents (not all) have positive “performance” or “cognitive” enhancing impacts. On the other hand, they are in a sense mind-altering and one consequence of their use is the downregulation of the processes that produces natural brain-generated transmitters. There are two consequences of this. You need to continue to take the stimulate or the boosting drug and you need to progressively increase the dosing of it to have a stable amplifying effect. When you’re off the stimulant, everything is turned down. Artificially establishing a situation over time in which you must have a stimulant to perform at a high level is a rather questionable life strategy.

We know that you can drive changes in the brain that are equivalent to taking a stimulant drug through an intensive brief period of brain exercise. I’ve earlier described brain exercises that we apply that are specifically designed to upregulate norepinephrine. We’ve shown that if you work at an exercise for a few minutes, before you enter a learning cycle, it accelerates learning rate and increases asymptotic learning achievements across a period of tens of minutes. If you do this everyday for several weeks, the upregulation of the release of the stimulant from the natural processes of the brain appears to be sustained out to the future. The difference? It’s all natural and it operates 24/7.

A:

yeah I am in the process is actually analogue at first, and then everything is scanned and put together in photo shop and after effects. The pencil drawings are the way that I liked to work. we did a john Henry like race, animating in photoshop and adding texture, and the scanned pencil drawings won. but the breath is on photoshop with a wacom,


Q:

27 years. - John

A:

ill die first :)

and i plan to die when i am 123 years old [peacefully with a smile of gratitude on my tattered face] so we have a ways to go


Q:

One exercise we go through with candidates is identifying different family friends within your network. What professions do the people around you have? Aunts, uncles, friends of your parents, older alumni from your high school or college, etc. Grab a coffee or a beer with them and really pick their brain.

You'd be surprised by how much people love to give advice and guidance for someone interested in their field. Don't be too shy to reach out!

A:

I think I would have a lot less issues if I was able to leave when i wanted to. Most of the fear comes from sitting in that room for hours.


Q:

I think he's saying that music is a subset and form of communication.

A:

Do you feel you look like more of an albino orca, Lebanese house maiden, or morbidly obese Mexican?


Q:

Good Morning Dr. Merzenich! Thanks for taking the time to do this AMA! My question is about brain health and it's role in education. NPR recently did a story on a school that is beginning to utilize an understanding of neuroplasticity and brain health in the classroom to combat the effects of poverty and chronic stress on the brains of school children and to eventually improve educational outcomes.

The role of neuroscience and plasticity as applied in the traditional model of education seems so limited given what we know about the brain and what we are still learning. Talking about brain health in a school setting feels so taboo. Why do you think that is? What are some ways that we can bring more awareness of neuroplasticity to teachers? And if the principles of neuroplasticity and brain health were implemented in classrooms what might that look like and do you think we would have better educational outcomes? Thanks again for your time!

A:

What are some lesser known, or outside of the mainstream animated films and animators that you would recommend to someone interested in more obscure or artistic animation films?

Why do you choose this clearly more difficult process over easier modern methods of animation?


Q:

So I think the Series end was great, but if given the chance, would you do new episodes for streaming services like Netflix or Amazon?

A:

With Bass Center 2016 being absolutely MASSIVE with 25k+ attendance each day and camping, why the move to Hampton this year with less than half the capacity and without camping?

In the final moments of Basslights 2015 you called the Coliseum “one of your favorite buildings in America”. Why?


Q:

How should I respond if they ask me about job jumping (I.e. Switching jobs every few years)? Companies aren't loyal to you anymore but expect you to be, and the only way to move up is by leveraging your current position to land a better one elsewhere.

Is it appropriate to ask an interviewer for feedback to improve myself for the future?

A:

What is the process of visitors being able to enter your school? Usually for us, you can just enter through the main office without a problem. After the shooting, did this change?


Q:

I believe we should think of music as a form of communication, but you are right, not a coding system. It sounds like you all get the difficulty of this question!

A:

I knew this was a bad idea but #2, a lebanese house maiden


Q:

One of the reasons people don’t think about brain health very often is because there has been no medicine to address issues of brain health. The child goes to the doctor, the doctor asks how they are, the child indicates that they’re fine, and the doctor concludes the child has a healthy brain. We also tend to translate brain health in terms of academic performance. The brain is a vascularized physical organ that can be in a sense flabby and in bad organic shape, just like any other organ. So inside every classroom at school, there are almost certain to be children in front of the teacher that have a very unhealthy brain. We know that the brain is degraded in its operations in ways that impact its general health by ongoing high stress in childhood. A child who has to live with high stress is impacted in ways that will frustrate their success in school and in life. A standard approach to this has been to blame the child for their failures and misbehavior. Now that we know so clearly that in fact their failures are substantially due to the neurological injuries that comes from very difficult childhoods there is a moral imperative to help them. Intensive brain-plasticity based restoration is a large part of the answer. I applaud any school site that understands this and undertakes the important task of helping these children to come back to the mainstream. It will be a better world when we identify every child that has this kind of unfortunate history and do whatever we can to help them be one of us.

Posit Science’s research team is conducting studies in very severely Adverse Childhood Experiences Impacted using a combination of meditation related practices, computerized brain training, social attachment related therapy, and life coaching. They’re seeing high success in helping these children in this large cohort. If you’d like to know more about that send me a PM.

A:

Jeremy Clapin, Sean Buckelew, Joseph Pierce, Suzie Templeton, Mikey Please, and a crazy motion comic-animation I love is Tatsume


Q:

Yes, it was my favorite show and I have real separation anxiety about it - BW

A:

this is a LONG answer, and it involved a lot of really crazy background stuff [multiple insane camping festival sites that fell through last minute and a ton of different ideas which were all being juggled] ... and essentially Hampton Coliseum really wanted me to come back, and it seemed like a great opportunity, and also i wanted to try something a bit more intimate and left field in Colorado... having pulled off the biggest show of my career in 2016 in Colorado [and not only big, but AMAZING... the crowd was so incredibly loving and kind, the vibe was SO next level, the camp ground was SO lovely, the fans left the site SO clean, it was amazing] i wasnt thinking "yes! bigger is better! now i gotta come back and play to a hundred thousand people!!" AHHH... i dont want to take over the world

as it happens we have this AMAZING camp ground in Colorado which we are working on something for 2018... its just all SO much work to pull this stuff off... so while we are working on that, i got to put together something im arguably even more inspired by:

FREESTYLE SESSIONS!!!

this is something i hope to do all over, and basically turn the Creativity Knob up to max... getting to just dj in a freestyle context [like what would i play at a house party] mixed with all the magic of how our shows have evolved... its super inspiring

we are setting up the room differently than a show [diminishing the stage, creating a space which feels omni directional] and i have been working OVERTIME to dig up so many old gems and throw backs and basically remixing constantly...ive remixed HUNDREDS of old classics from my record collection... its just gonna me a free for all musical orgy of some of my favorite music, as well as tons of left field stuff, and even new music ive never played before - plus any other track i wanna drop ;)


Q:

This is a tricky question to tackle broadly since every industry has different norms and perspectives on tenure.

For example, a 12-24 month tenure in some industries (consulting, early-level investment banking & private equity, large tech) is perceived as normal, while it would be shockingly short in pharmaceuticals.

Our advice is generally you want to be testing your market value and opportunities for promotion constantly, but be sensitive to your industry's norms.

The standard answer that does not raise eyebrows during an interview is along the lines of "I was able to land a position that offered more responsibility, opportunity and career development."

A:

I left the school after sophomore year but initially after the shooting I didn't really notice much more security other than a couple more police officers.


Q:

The brain works in mysterious ways.

A:

Hi Bobby, #Big fan! In Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, what messages were those aliens sending you?


Q:

What do you think about brain training companies like Lumosity?

A:

How did you choose the planets this story is set on? As an animation filmmaker how have you chosen your style? As someone who believes the major animation style, whilst changing, has not improved over the last 15 years, how has technology impacted on animation style? Finally, how does the comic book industry affect your work?


Q:

How much money would it take to crowdsource more futurama episodes?

A:

If you weren't making music, what would be your 9-5?


Q:

I'm an older worker (60) who has spent most of his life as a janitor or janitor supervisor. I have other skills, but I feel most jobs won't even consider me due to my age or because I'm a janitor. Is there something I could put on my resume so a company would at least give me an interview?

A:

Were you offered counseling services? Are you able to receive ongoing support for your PTSD?


Q:

OK, you got me. Hopefully that confirms my identity too ...

A:

I just spit my water out


Q:

One way to evaluate the claims of the available brain training programs is to look at the underlying research. Independent researchers (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28092015) recently published the first systematic review of the science behind commercially available brain-training programs. They identified 18 companies and found that 11 companies had no clinical trials or empirical evidence indicating that they helped with healthy aging. The remaining seven companies were classified into three levels of evidence with the highest level requiring at least two well-designed randomized controlled trials, at least one of which met gold standards. BrainHQ outranked Cognifit, Cogmed, BrainAge2, My Brain Trainer, Dakim, and Lumosity by a large margin, with more than twice the number of highest-standards controlled trials than any other commercial competitor. Lumosity actually came in the bottom bracket of those companies shown to have evidence.

This work clearly demonstrates that when it comes to brain training, not all programs are alike. At the same time this does not mean that there is no value to the training exercises sold by these companies, it simply means that they sell things for which they have limited hard evidence that they actually work.

A:

It started from three threads. Chicago disasters, my interest in Psychiatry , and the notion of the lost traveler, things like the franklin expedition, and the Boris Karloff thread came in one day while animating and listening to an old Lights Out program. The planet I made up, because I did not want to be tied to facts about a particular planet, I wanted to have room make things up, it has elements of several moons, though I do give it an atmosphere, and a relatively earthlike gravity. I also like the idea that it is maybe 10 15 miles in diameter so you can kind of hide, but not completely. you cannot escape yourself .


Q:

How much money you got? - John

A:

i think either a high school history teacher or a guidance counselor... OR! i would love to do preschool or kindegarten, i got my teachers degree when i graduated [was busy with a minor in education, minor in electornic music, and a major in Community Studies] and just wanted to work with music and social change, and inspire/protect/guide people who needed friendship and support.... id also love to write novels...like stories or something


Q:

It's definitely not impossible for older job seekers to make career changes and find something new with their experience. Make sure you are CURRENT - create a LinkedIn profile if you don't already have one and take the time to fill it out and put in a nice, professional headshot. You have a lot of work experience that can be relevant to other fields, so research the positions that you'd like to work in and emphasize how your background will help you to fulfill the requirements of the position. Be prepared to be flexible in terms of payment, don't undersell yourself but realize that if you come off as an expensive hire, you may be passed over for a younger worker willing to settle for less money. Finally, tap into your network, talk to friends/past colleagues or anyone you know working in the industry you're looking to change into. This can be a great help in landing a new position.

A:

Counselors, therapy dogs and all sorts of people were at the school for the remainder of the year. I only really took advantage of the therapy dogs. I would skip class just to hangout with them.

Right now I currently see a psycho-therapist and personally choose to no longer take medication. (I tried Prozac, Zoloft, and Wellbutrin)


Q:

Have you heard of and done any research into ASMR?

A:

Bobby, in this clip you went on an hour long rant, trashing a bunch of comedians. Did any of them get mad over this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=savCAd6RyPI


Q:

What is the latest research on reversing short term memory loss? Also in specific ,memory loss from damaged hippocampus. Thank you.

A:

What was it like working out the deal for you to use Boris Karloff's voice for your Bison?


Q:

For John Dimaggio, I remember in one episode Bender ran into Jake from Adventure Time, Jake asked him "What time is it?" and Bender told him "Time for you to shut up!" Did anyone working on Adventure Time or Cartoon Network comment on that?

A:

Can you speak a little deeper into what your inspiration was for 'Was Will Be' ..?..

this song is super duper spiritual, and I know it goes deeper for you than what you explained on the EP cover.


Q:

Cover letters -- how important or not important are these actually? I'm sure it varies greatly by industry and maybe even by geographical location, but in general what are your thoughts on writing them, and ideal length?

A:

have they discussed possibly trying EMDR (non medication based technique) it is supposed to help a lot with PTSD.

Glad to hear you had initial support and have ongoing support.

Hope your recovery continues smoothly.


Q:

Do you mean Autonomous sensory meridian response? I don't know of any research, but it is a fairly recent topic, and one not directly related to my research, so there may be something out there.

A:

That was a great whale joke. Fucking bravo, great whale joke


Q:

Restoration of memory is commonly approached by applying either one of two general strategies. The usual training form is to practice remembering. This approach stems from a long history is cognitive experimental psychology where the natural therapeutic approach has been to address a weakness by practicing in ways that would be imagined to directly overcome it. For memory this means 3 things: practicing to remember longer strings or lists of information, practicing to recall things that you know belong together or that are associated, and learning tricks or strategies or methods to work around your failing memory. All of these strategies have compensatory value but none of them actually fix the fundamental neurological problems that usually apply to an individual with a failure memory. For example, older people lose their memory primarily for 2 reasons. The first is that the brain no longer represents information it's receiving or manipulating in as sharp or salient form. Because information is represented unreliably in a “fuzzy” neurological way it struggles to record it. Recovery of memory requires training that again refines, sharpens, increases the salience of, and recovers the reliability of the representation of the high-speed details of what you have just seen or heard or felt. Secondly, old brains are noisy and that nosiness results in problems of interference for any long sustained operation. It’s important that you train the brain in ways that suppresses and reduces that noisiness. All of these basic contributors to memory failure can be very positively engaged in most individuals by appropriate, intensive exercise. That exercise can come in natural forms or by engaging yourself in the right forms of computerized exercises.

A:

was not a deal, I was blindly falling deeper into it, and then I sent a long email, about what I was trying to do with the film, and how I felt it would honor him.. sometimes that is all it takes, I have had people have things like that work out with famous musicians IE, can I please use your song... answer... yes


Q:

Pendleton Ward is a big fan, and Matt is a big fan of his. - John

A:

i love that you ask that!

so musically, the inspiration was to recreate the vibe from Expanded, Breathless, and my Plugged In remix... something like "into the sun" but in that halftime drum & bass vibe. i was working on this for about a year, and actually it was gonna be TKO at one point...as odd as that may sound.

but the music is and was so uplifting, and i always make temporary "work in progress" song titles for my tracks... i started calling it Was Will Be, which is kind of a nod to Present Past & Future...to feeling a sense of timelessness... and that is very humbling and euphoric and mesmerizing at the same time

because i realize im just a tiny blip or spark on the wheel of time, which spins infinitely, but my spark is just a split second during one of its revolutions... so anyways, i could wax poetic about that forever, but ... speaking of which i was gonna CALL the song "Forever" at one point.... then i started sending it out to vocalists... Lupe Fiasco, Zion I, Rye Rye, all kinds of people made really interesting concepts to it, but the one Mimi came up with was so haunting

she and i love to work together on concepts and lyrics, and although the song has very few lyrics, its super powerful to me

there are basically 3 phrases:

Feel It

Healing

Forever

and i just had to rinse that over and over and have her sing it all different ways and try each way over the various melodies of the song

i get goosebumps every time i hear the track

i played it the first time ever this past weekend, and it was my favorite moment of the set, i felt overwhelmed and i inhaled really suddenly and tons of my own hair went into my mouth and i could barely see or breathe but was just like singing the lyrics in my mind and getting teary eyed haahaha :)


Q:

Great question! We've worked with over a dozen career counselors here in the Bay Area and maintain a large network of recruiters -- the direction the hiring industry is moving towards is placing more emphasis on customizing covering emails -- cover letters are seen as a prerequisite and are often unread.

Nevertheless, it's good to include one as it passes a minimum bar -- we recommend 2-3 paragraphs and a density of roughly 75% of one full page. Mirror the header that you use in your resume.

A:

I haven't heard of that before, I'll make sure to look into it.

Thank you!


Q:

This is difficult to ask questions about. Seems like everyone has their own personal soundtrack list for motivation & relaxation.

I prefer radio stations that are theme based. Popular stations can alternate between aggressive beats and calming rhythms and when they play a song I wasn't 'in the mood for' I'm often quickly changing the channel even if it is a song I've enjoyed before.

I guess my question is this: how long does it take to change the mood by changing the tune?

A:

Hi Bobby, I love you on the Chip Chipperson Podacast! Have you ever thought about doing stand up comedy?


Q:

If you could choose to study one animal brain, which brain would you choose and why?

A:

Did you have scientific consultants or researchers to help with the Space and Astrophysical side to this story? Why Russian Cosmonauts? Why 100 Foot Bison voiced by Boris Karloff? Why psychotherapy? What the hell is going on in that scene where the lecture hall is chanting "I'm too sexy for my books"?

How does your creative process work, bringing all these things together for you? Pretty much everything about this movie seems to intentionally evoke a question, although I'm sure it all adds up somehow. Is that your intent to kind of put the viewer off balance?

Saw that your first film took 15 years to make... can you talk about that process and dedication from inception to completion and finally, it seems, success?


Q:

How many butt tattoos of bender have you had to look at?

A:

Hey Lorin! Really, really, really thankful that I have this chance to reach out to you after missing my last opportunity. To quickly preface, I’m 23. Up until age 21 my life was a constant whirlwind of misunderstanding, disconnection, and an absolutely morbid yearning to remove myself from this world permanently. Your philosophy and intention allowed me to find my own path, and these things truly opened my mind, tipping the balance for the better, allowing me to overcome the dark years of my life, a constant struggle with suicide. I am excessively excited to continue having a similar impact on other people as you did for me. 

I feel that what I’ve needed for a long time has been the opportunity to thank you from the bottom of my heart. You will always be in my heart, and know that every single day I strive to fill the hearts of others with joy, to be there for others in times of need, and to set an example that will live on through others.

As far as this post goes, it seems I have to ask a question. What's one of the most beautiful moments of your life so far? I'd love to know.


Q:

How difficult is it for someone to get hired in their field again if they're coming off of a year "sabbatical" or similar? Does it change by experience level? I have 3 years of experience in my field, and would really like to do some traveling...

A:

I'm very sorry for your experience. PTSD and anxiety can cripple someone mentally and I'm touched to hear you tell your story openly, thank you. The picture of you and your mom is powerful.

What are your plans for the future? Are you working, going to college?


Q:

I agree, everyone has their own musical preference! "how long does it take to change the mood by changing the tune?" I'm going to guess you mean how long does it take to change a person's mood by playing a specific kind of music. Is that right?

If that's what you mean, I think it all depends on whether or not the person is open to having his/her mood changed. We do experiments all the time in the perception of emotion -- and mood is understood by psychologists and neuroscientists as being the same sort of thing as emotion, but it just happens on a longer time scale And emotional experience is relatively short, whereas a mood can last days.

Anyway, imagine you just broke up with your lover, and you are in one of our experiments. You are horribly depressed, but I play you some music and ask whether its happy or sad. You can tell that it's happy, but it doesn't actually make you happy, you are still depressed.

But at other times, listening to happy music can actually change you mood. It is all about the interaction between the music and the intrinsic dynamics of your brain. It is going to take us a long time to sort that out scientifically.

A:

No. That's a homerun you cock sucka


Q:

I have been fascinated by the neurology of some of the world’s stranger creatures. One of my favorites studies I conducted as a young scientist was to try and understand the meaning of the very, very strange brain of that had been described in a burrowing animal in the Pacific Northwest called a mountain beaver (aplodontia). My colleagues and I were able to show that this animal had subsonic hearing. Compressing the air in a box 3x3x3 meters by 1cc was detectable in the animals hearing. It has a massive neurological specialization that processes this information. How does the animal use it? It plugs its burrow with its fat little body. It senses pressure changes from anything else in the burrow and has constructed a burrow in which it can always escape. By this single trick, this rodent with the lowest breeding rate of any rodent has survived unchanged from 70 million years. We humans have no single trick as good as this one. The animal kingdom is absolutely chock-full of neurological marvels like this. Many unknown, and even unsuspecting.

A friend in Australia discovered a second animal that had a brain that looked like just a mountain beaver’s. This animal was detecting minute changes in air pressure but not underground in a dark tunnel. It was located in the tops of the highest trees in the continent of Australia. It’s called the feather-tailed glider (the beloved animal on the Australian penny) and it uses the same incredible faculty to monitor the minute changes in wind current to stay aloft and not fall out of the tree. It’s amazing that these two creatures have such a similar brain.

We are largely abandoning the study of the neurology of interesting creatures like this. Modern science has just lost interest. What a shame.

One last point: my paper on the mountain beaver is the least often cited of the 250-300 peer-reviewed papers I have published in life as a scientist but is one of the papers (as the true nerd that I am) that I am most proud of.

I wish that we knew a lot more about the neurology of lots of creatures in the world because I think that knowing more would contribute to the role we have to play in conserving them on the planet. But my days of studying the brains of animals are long past, with one exception. That is, Homo sapiens, in some ways a primitive species and in some ways an advanced species with a pretty interesting brain. While it’s not nearly as special as most people imagine, Homo have a pretty impressive machine inside their skulls.

A:

To be honest the short answer is, because it felt right, the longer answer is that I always have several stories floating down this flooded river in my head, and I pick them up, and find relations, because they came into my head through some common thread. for instance my father died in 1969, as did Boris Karloff, and in some way a conflated their loss. this one is going slow, but not as slow, the Bison is just a crazy idea that flew into my head. something that is too large to share its love, like in mice and men.


Q:

Many, many...too many... I've seen more asses with a Bender tattoo than toilet seats. >John

A:

THAT IS SO BEAUTIFUL!!!! :)

i have experienced deeply moving and cathartic experiences of growth and change...painful upheavals, frightening chaos, isolation, confusion, deep fear...and also beauty, sunrise, mystery, awe, connection... i think it moves in cycles

and we all get to play a part in each other's stories, to whatever degree we wish [which is why Random Acts of Kindness is so fun and important]....its why i never understand when someone says "im bored" its like...youre what?

every single moment of life is a chance to breathe in the beauty, the mystery, the awe of life... we are miracles, even at the WORST times, the most painful and awful, its still such a crazy coincidence that you were even born at all... its a CRAZY FUCKING MINDBAFFLING COINCIDENCE THAT YOUR PARENTS WERE EVEN BORN! much less survived everything under the sun, and made it to the point where there created you and now YOU have all these insanely complex nuances and ideas and opportunities and experiences...how can someone be bored

and beyond bored, how can someone be self destructive? there are so many constant opportunities to give that even in the darkest of times, you can still make a new friend, you can still marvel at nature, you can still give countless gifts of kindness to others...

i have had a lot of people reach out to me about suicide, well over hundreds, so probably several thousand, in the last few years. I've known several dear friends who have gone through with it or attempted it, and I am not trained to counsel about it, its so tender and sensitive. I used to work with this service called 211, which was like 911, but a national service for suicide prevention, but i would just direct people there and sometimes i would call three ways, but i feel and felt like i had no business really professionally counselling [not yet at least]

so instead of that, i chose to just reflect kindness and and try to be as encouraging as i can be [nobody is perfect and its not always easy] but as with politics, i just drifted to a place more general and deep: human connection... i want to reflect that and i am overjoyed that you received that transmission

hopefully as you move forward in life you too can reflect compassion and kindness and tender sensitivity toward others... reaching out and making friends and looking out for fellow humans who need a helping hand: thats what lifes about :)


Q:

We work with many clients who are returning to the workforce or have gaps in their work experience. It is important to mention the reasoning for any of these in BOTH the cover letter and any warm introductory emails you send during your job search.

If the gap is less than 6 months, it is fairly normal and most hiring managers will not mention it in an interview. Given there are non-competes, garden leaves, and other common reasons for a gap, you'll only really need to go in depth if you are not working for over a year.

A:

I graduated this year. Im planning on attending community college in the fall. Not sure what I want to study.

Thank you for your kind words.


Q:

I love this :) I'm currently trying it in my quite basement as I was doing homework and it's not doing anything just yet but I feel like I'm doing it right as I can hear the sound is louder and more effective while your hands are covering your ears exactly as if my head is a drum lol I will try more and more

A:

Hi Bobby, #Big fan! How difficult is it shooting a scene for a show/movie when the set isn't near the ocean?


Q:

1) Do the quality of our thoughts also change our brains? Can having positive self talk etc improve our brains?

2) Can I become smarter at 25 given I've been cognitively stagnant for the past 9 years? Is it possible?

A:

Did you have scientific consultants or researchers to help with the Space and Astrophysical side to this story? Why Russian Cosmonauts? Why 100 Foot Bison voiced by Boris Karloff? Why psychotherapy? What the hell is going on in that scene where the lecture hall is chanting "I'm too sexy for my books"?

How does your creative process work, bringing all these things together for you? Pretty much everything about this movie seems to intentionally evoke a question, although I'm sure it all adds up somehow. Is that your intent to kind of put the viewer off balance?

Saw that your first film took 15 years to make... can you talk about that process and dedication from inception to completion and finally, it seems, success?


Q:

How much fun was it recording the DVD commentaries?

A:

Saw your show at Electric Forest this past wknd. "It's Just a Ride" was the most powerful moment of the wknd for me - it left me in tears, and it's still giving me chills. Thank you for imploring us to choose love! I noticed before your show, they were playing John Lennon‘s "Imagine". I was curious if that was intentional, given his prominence in the "Just a Ride" montage?


Q:

[deleted]

A:

Thank you for sharing this. I know this is something tragic, but you wrote it beautifully. What has been the most helpful technique or skill you've learned from therapy?


Q:

So the rhythmic aspect of attention I refer to in my bio a scientific finding in which things that happen when you expect them to are perceived more accurately. This is a lower level kind of attention that what we think of when we think of ADHD. Research is currently underway to determine whether exercising the temporal form of attention can increase people's attentional focus in general focus.

A:

You're the worst fans in the world. Love you. But not that hard


Q:

Can you get smarter at 25? Half of the variance of adaptive intelligence is explained by variance in brain speed. Can your brain speed be accelerated? Not a problem. The right kind of brain exercises on a computer, or the right kind of natural activities, can contribute to an acceleration of the natural processes of your brain at every brain system level. When scientists studying intelligence tried to understand other factors that contributed to adaptive or fluid intelligence, they added 4 or 5 other key factors to that list. Fortunately for you, they are also all plastic. So can you recover your brain power, and make yourself “smarter”? Get to it. I should say that psychologists that study these issues have wrestled with the mutability of intelligence for a long time. There is still a strong body of psychology deniers, sort of like the global warming deniers, that seem to lack a full appreciation of our capacity to change our neurological abilities to change the machinery of our brain, by engaging in the appropriate forms of exercise.

In time, they will get over this.

As for changing your attitude, to change your capabilities; can you talk to yourself and drive yourself into a ditch? Or to improve your performance abilities? Learning and achievement is contextual. If I simply explain to individuals – adults or children – that they have a clear capacity to change their brain for the better, I increase the likelihood that over time, they will be better. If I simply educate children in the fifth grade that their brains are plastic, they will do better in the sixth grade. This is well-established science. Of course, the same applies on the negative side of life. My dear sweet mother-in-law, a master pie maker, began telling herself at about age 70 that she could no longer make a good pie. Pretty soon, she couldn’t. It is a very good idea to live life with a positive attitude.

A:

accidentally I have become friends with Lindsy Elkins, and have watched her space science ventures (mission to psyche) and love to think about things like gravitational volvanism, and Gamma blasts


Q:

It was a total party that would later pass as 'entertainment'. - BW

A:

hi! thanks!!!!

I try and plan the 'tweener music' between each set or before each set [every once in a while it doesnt happen and some sound tech will blast surf rock, which is also cool] but like last weekend i made a mix of Minecraft music, and mixed it into Imagine, and a few other doozies :)

i ahve tons of little micro-sets of old records i like to give to the sound tech to play before the set begins

and YES YES YES! you should watch ZEITGEIST MOVIE!!!! ITS FREE AND ONLINE! Its amazing!

that part sampled is from the end of the 1st version [i think there are 3 full length episodes/versions]

within the first version, the bit about religion is what i found most touching, but also it gets philosophical at the end :)

very important stuff :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrHeg77LF4Y


Q:

Reaching out to your network can be a great way to break into your industry, and it can be useful when trying to overcome the hurdle of a lack of experience from not being able to find a relevant job. If you are still acquiring skills in your unrelated job that could be relevant to a position in a different industry, talk about that. Reach out to people on LinkedIn. Talk about your career goals in your summary. A lack of work experience is definitely a big obstacle but it isn't the nail in the coffin of your job search - you'll just have to find creative and more direct ways around it, like direct outreach.

A:

You're very kind, thank you.

I haven't really found anything that has helped a lot. It's a very slow process. I think one thing I always try to remember though is if I feel panicked I try to ground myself and look at my surroundings and remind myself that I'm safe.


Q:

A little off topic but, after listening to very strong, droning rhythms my head/brain feel like they do this "pulsing" thing in time with the rhythm for minutes after it ends. Any idea what's up with that?

A:

How difficult is it for you to not step on greggshells considering you weigh the best part of a tonne?


Q:

Within the context of your field of expertise, what thing(s) do you believe/speculate are probably true, but for which there is currently no conclusive evidence?

A:

Hi Chris, Very excited about the upcoming film, already donated to kickstarter. My question is: Do you consider this film (and your previous film) as existing better in context strictly with other animated features (or shorts) or do you wish or hope that it will be considered alongside other independent live action films? (and as a potential follow up: is one better than the other?)


Q:

After watching the live stream on Facebook last week I was absolutely floored by how many characters each of you voice and how you make them all sound unique. For the vocal actors, how do you find inspiration for each individual character you voice?

A:

Hi Lorin, my question: a lot of time I find there to be philosophical messages in your shows (first that comes to mind is Grand Rapids 2015 Ex Machina clip, a movie that focuses heavily on the philosophical Problem About Mary regarding AI and the philosophy of mind & consciousness) and was wondering if you have any favorite philosophers, philosophical works, and other quirky philosophical puzzles you think about?

Thanks! P.S. Glad you appreciate David Foster Wallace like I do :)


Q:

Any suggestions for linked in profiles? I am trying to find a new job that is more than a lateral move. I get a few inquiries through it every month but want to make it more effective

A:

I just want to second the comment about your writing. It's very very good, have you thought about writing professionally?


Q:

There has not been much empirical research on the experience you describe. But neural oscillations have a life of their own, so once they synchronize to a strong beat with a specific frequency, they can (at least in theory) continue to produce that frequency indefinitely.

A:

That's mean and hurtful


Q:

There has been great interest in documenting the influences on brain health contributed from physical aspects of body health. Scientists have compellingly documented aspects of the status of your digestive system and the biome that lives within it as an example of a body-based factor that you could manipulate on the path to improving your brain health. There are a host of other medical sources of advice about how a good body advantages a strong brain. There is remarkably limited evidence about how physical body health influences brain health. That applies even while we know that the brain is making a significant and direct contribution to the modulation of factors that contribute to the health of every physical process and body organ.

We have scanty but dramatic evidence that the healthier the brain, the longer you live because brain health strongly impacts body health. We believe that we can train a brain in ways that strongly impact the status of the autonomic nervous system control. That control provides a primary basis of regulation of the cardiovascular system and of the health of every body organ (e.g., https://www.zotero.org/groups/301482/cognitive_training_data/items/tag/Heart%20Failure). When ANS regulation dies or flat lines, you die. There’s new evidence in animal studies that seem to show that the neuromodulatory processes in the brain increases immune response powers in the body. Of course neurological processes very strongly regulates hormones and hormones have powerful impacts that relate to the health of every body organ. We’ve conducted studies in animals that show we can upregulate the activity of areas in the brainstem that can almost certainly contribute to the regulations and the constituencies of the biome in the gut. People don’t think of the biome to the brain influences as being a two-way street but it is. Lots of people want to argue that you need to sustain your physical fitness to have a happy brain. I argue that you almost certainly need to have a healthy brain on the path to extending the duration of your life on the planet.

A:

Really relevent question, Consuming Spirits actually did much better in Live action festivals than it did in animation festivals, partially because it was a film playing in the wrong place (do this when ever you can) the critical praise for Consuming Spirits first came from live action critics, then animation came in more in 2013. Chris Robinson, Carolina Lopex, Nobuaki Doi, Jasmin Basic, Daniel Soldjek (zagreb) are programmers in the animation world who helped me a lot. But first it was Tasha Robinsin, A.O. Scott, Michael Phillips, who made people consider the film as a film, I hope for the same trajectory with The Orbit of Minor Satellites.


Q:

You can get it from the character bible, which is basically an outline of all the character's traits (his/her point of view). You get it from the drawing, voices that you've heard in your own past. There are many avenues of inspiration. > John

A:

i love Einstein... i read a book he wrote called "Thoughts & Ideas By Albert Einstein" and if you mix that with Ray Kurzweil's "The Age of Spiritual Machines" and the whimsy of Tom Robbins... thats kind of the philosophy which is echoing around in my brain :)


Q:

A few tips for Linkedin profiles - make sure you search for jobs and save ones that you're interested in, keep all your content up-to-date and formatted in a way that highlights your achievements, use a clear, professional headshot, and don't be afraid to reach out through the messaging feature to recruiters or other companies that post that they are hiring. It can be a great way to get a direct connection with hiring manager/recruiters/HR departments.

A:

Thank you so much!

I used to want to write professionally when I was little, haven't thought about it in quite a long time though.


Q:

Do you think that neurons responsible for this sort of response from sound are involved with the sensation of consciousness?

Are the same brain areas involved with the creation and perception of music, or are different regions involved?

A:

Would you rather be fat and dying or skinny with aids?


Q:

For those who can't afford BrainHQ, what other domestic methods do you suggest to make their brains perform better and repel degradation?

A:

Hi Chris, Very excited about the upcoming film, already donated to kickstarter. My question is: Do you consider this film (and your previous film) as existing better in context strictly with other animated features (or shorts) or do you wish or hope that it will be considered alongside other independent live action films? (and as a potential follow up: is one better than the other?)


Q:

Loved the documentary you made, "I Know That Voice" by the way. Provides a lot of insight on this question and just generally showcases how impressive professional voice actors are.

It is a shame that big studios these days will just get big name stars to do a phoned-in performance for big budget animated features when there's so much talent in the VA community.

A:

Thoughts & Ideas By Albert Einstein

I believe you mean "Ideas and Opinions" by Einstein :)

Link for anybody interested!


Q:

I feel trapped in a career I don't like, at 27 I want to find something I can enjoy more and feel confident and happy growing within. How do I start and what steps do i need to take to get there?

A:

You wrote professionally when you were little?

Edit: I totally missed the word 'want'. My bad.


Q:

Great question! You are referring to the well-respected scientific theory that synchrony of neuronal oscillations is responsible for our unified experience of consciousness. The idea behind that theory is that neurons communicate only when they are synchronized, so this phenomena literally allows different parts of the brain to communicate with one another (or not) depending on what you are doing at the time.

I believe this is related to neural entrainment to musical and speech rhythms in the following way. Imagine there are two brains instead of one. How would they communicate? By synchronizing oscillations. But how would they do that? With sound. So I believe musical communication and speech communication are essentially ways of synchronizing multiple brains so we can communicate.

There is plenty of evidence that people who merely synchronize body movements 1) like each other more and 2) are more likely to cooperate with one another. There is also direct evidence of inter-brain synchronization between musician using electroencephalograph (EEG).

A:

Both


Q:

Please take a look at my response to /u/venomeater69 for natural ways to maintain your organic brain health.

We very much wish we could provide it to every citizen in the world for free and hope that at some point in the future something close to that will be achieved. A BrainHQ subscription costs about $14 a month which is not too many cups of coffee and a person can do a lot in a month. Why not think about a several week long bootcamp once or twice a year where you take full advantage of that relatively small investment. If there is a reason why someone is devoid of resources, write a note to me and I’ll try to help.

Also note that quite a few public libraries now offer BrainHQ for the citizens of their community or town for free. If you’re lucky maybe your library can provide that for you. If not, you might ask them to consider providing that service.

A:

and thank you!


Q:

Thanks so much, 5th anniversary of its release is coming up. >John

A:

you're right! i have a copy which says "Thoughts & IDeas By" and it has one picture of him, and then i dound "Ideas & Opinions By" and its the same text, differnt cover :)


Q:

Decide what it is that you want to accomplish in order to reach this feeling of fulfillment. Once you have a clear understanding of what it is you need to work for, you can start to figure out which positions and companies could help you fulfill this. Some people are born to be entrepreneurs and the only way to fulfill their career goals is to break out on their own and start a business. Other people get a great sense of achievement from working on a team and accomplishing a lot for a greater cause like a big company. It all depends on the individual. Once you have a clear idea of specifically what you need to accomplish in order to get this boost of confidence, happiness, and sense of internal growth, you can start to find positions that will help you get there. Make a list of your career goals. Research different companies and their missions and see which ones have values that align with your own. This is a great way to start and hopefully, you'll figure it all out a lot faster.

A:

No no as a child I dreamed that one day I would write and be an author.


Q:

I've had this debate with some people; I study music theory as a hobby, and I think that all music stems from some objective fundamentals that have to do with how the brain perceives sound. The opposing argument is that music is largely a cultural thing and that musical tastes and patterns have more to do with the time period we live in than physical principles. In your experience, what side do you identify with?

Thanks for doing this!!!!! Really cool stuff

A:

*would you rather be yourself or Jim Norton


Q:

Is there a level of plasticity that can occur outside the brain? For example, given enough time (even if longer than a typical human life span) could a paraplegic reroute certain functions via peripheral nerves to reconnect below the point of injury? I know in cases of heart blockages there is often evidence of angiogenesis trying to route blood around the blockages. Anything like this in the neural arena?

A:

What an interesting storyline! What was your inspiration and how did this script come to be?


Q:

What made Richard Nixon a recurring character? Why not someone else?

A:

How do you come up with setlist?


Q:

How does one get around a college degree requirement? My friend has almost 20 years experience in his field and in management but has trouble being considered for positions outside his current company because he doesn't have a degree.

A:

Do you think your life can ever go back to the way it was before? Or at least similar?


Q:

I'm firmly on your side on this one. But many of my colleagues believe it is ALL learned and cultural.

I think that once you understand the predictions of neural dynamics, you see that there are fundamental neural processes -- like the way nonlinear oscillations respond to rhythms -- that do an astonishingly good job of predicting human neural and perceptual responses. And if you check out the visualizations on our YouTube page, you can literally see for yourself how well our neural networks "get" the rhythm. For example, check out the response to this sax solo by Alex Blade Silver of the Civilians. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcU_2hv_wok It starts out responding on 1 and 3 , but when Alex emphasizes a faster metrical level, it goes to the faster level (every quarter note). And when his rhythm slows, the LEDs get that too. It does all this without any learning.

But ... I wouldn't try to argue that learning isn't important. It is! There is a critical contribution of the musical culture and style learning. In fact, our theory includes a learning component, and our research now focuses heavily on learning.

These ideas apply not only to rhythm, but also to pitch consonance/dissonance and tonality, as I mentioned in an answer above. Check out our publications page top read about it: http://musicdynamicslab.uconn.edu/publications/

A:

See above


Q:

Of course plasticity is occurring on a substantial level within the spinal code and brainstem, that is to say below the forebrain itself. And peripheral nerves and sensory organs do have some level of regenerative power. It’s possible that some level of rerouting can occur but I can think of no illustration on a scale equivalent like that recorded in the tissues of the brain itself. I’ve long believed that it’s an understudied scientific issue. For example, we know that the quality of information from sensory receptors in the skin and internal organs progressively deteriorates as they die off at older ages. Is this die off use-dependent? Could we be doing things that better sustain them? We also know that we can recovery the integrity of the autonomic nervous system by brain exercises. Here we can see strong effects in the physical body expressed by changes in the power of actions recorded of course far outside the brain. These are not the kinds of things people have considered plastic but they clearly are.

A:

see above, and then continuing on. I have always been interested in strange treatments. be it electro shock, imprinting therapy. or how trauma can sometimes release a mind. some one is badly hurt, and wakes up somehow healed of something else.the writing of the script then began to unfold, and I became interested in one room in the film being live action, that is an interesting part too.


Q:

The writers liked a head in a jar that said "Arrrrooo". - BW

A:

its a pretty complex process for me, and insanely time consuming. i have multiple interfaces like spreadsheets [where every song in my collection is listed with notes about it, tempo, melodic information, other random notes] and text files with massive brainstorms, i make a brainstorm in writing before any set, and i have these saved for over ten years [sometimes before a big event like bass center, when i'm playing three consecutive nights and doing zero repeats, i need to go in hella deep and reference 'what did i play last time at bass center? what did i play last time in colorado? what did i play last weekend? what do i wanna play NEXT weekend in new york' etc] and so it starts to spread out into this fuckin INSANE matrix of overwhelming possibility!!!! then that's just the pregame daydreaming. then i go insane with Ableton... i countless grips of tracks and loops and samples all cut up in various ways, color coded, etc, and i start mixing and matching, and creating new stuff, and getting distracted, and blah blah blach....

eventually i will end up with a massive Ableton session, bursting with possibility, and i spend a large amount of the set strategizing and subtractively editing the incoming possibilities [like nah...i dont wanna play that now, or nahhhh i am not gonna play that tonight after all]... so i can often have a 5 hour set prepared for a one hour time slot.

in general the week before any set i am totally Charlie in this clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nTpsv9PNqo


Q:

Consider a local staffing company or recruiter. With 20 years of experience, education should be an afterthought.

A:

I don't think so.

The person I was minutes before the shooting and the person I am now are completely different.


Q:

Sorry if this is vague, but a colleague of mine went to SFN and described some resesrch about EEG recordings being used to playback music that the brain was hearing. There were correlations about literary and musical ability that predicted the clarity and accuracy of the sounds the listener was hearing (better readers and musicians had clearer playback from their EEG session). Are you familiar with this research and do you have any opinions on what these correlations mean?

Likewise, are there any neuromiaging studies that have looked at determining what kind sound (or music) someone is simply imagining in their head?

A:

Do you get hard looking at sinks?


Q:

How can I know if I'm at risk for Alzheimer's?

In my mid 30s now, and noticing I'm not remembering things as well as I used to. Not sure if this is just a normal part of aging. I've done a commercial genetic test (23andMe), which was negative for increased Alzheimer’s risk, but my understanding is that Alzheimer’s is not strongly linked genetics anyway. Is there anything else I can do to get a sense for my current brain health, and potentially spot early warning signs of dementia?

A:

What an interesting storyline! What was your inspiration and how did this script come to be?


Q:

What state is New New York in?

A:

Lorin, how many times have you seen Bassnectar?


Q:

When someone is trying to convey that they have managed high dollar budgets, is it appropriate to say a dollar amount, or is it better to just describe the resources you were responsible for? i.e. 10 fleet vehicles, or 30 employees payroll, 900 computers, etc.

A:

I recently moved away from Bellingham (to Charleston, oddly enough) and I remember hearing about this and feeling totally heartbroken for you guys. How are your fellow students/survivors doing these days?

Your writing is beautiful. Thank you for sharing your story, I can imagine that was difficult.


Q:

Great question. Your colleague may be referring to the work of Dr. Nina Kraus and her colleague Erika Skoe (now my colleague at UConn), who once recorded from human brain stem of people listening to "smoke on the water". When she plays the EEG, you can literally hear the song in the brainstem. I love that demo! Yes, I definitely have an opinion. The human brainstem is synchronizing to music too, but at a much faster time scale that the cortex. The brainstem synchronizes at hundreds maybe even thousands of Hz. The cortex synchronizes in the delta-theta range (fractions of 1 Hz up to about 10 Hz), as I described above. Brainstem synchronization is important in explaining pitch perception and consonance/dissonance in music. We have a model of brainstem synchronization too (but we aren't using it in our visualizations yet). It was published as

Lerud, K. L., Almonte, F. V., Kim, J. C. & Large, E. W. (2014). Mode-locked neural oscillation predicts human auditory brainstem responses to musical intervals. Hearing Research, 308, 41-49.

A:

The right sink


Q:

Almost everybody is at risk for Alzheimer’s Disease. Or to put it in another way, risk is defined by (A) genetics (B) several hundred known vicissitudes that add to your risk of onset, (C) how you live your life in relation to the health of your brain. In the last case, how do you think you stack up? If you’re like 99% of the people in the world, you don’t really know what your brain is asking you to do to sustain its health and functionality. Genetics IS important and can clearly put you in a higher risk population but genetics is rarely definitive. We know that people in very high risk populations CAN sail through to the end of a long life without falling over the cliff.

Everyone should be monitoring their brain health from at least the middle of life onward. Calibrate yourself. One way to do this is to go to BrainHQ.com and complete exercises in the speed and attention categories. See how your performance relates to other individuals of your age. More generally, you can assess your speed of operations in any task that challenges you to recognize and respond to things at high speed. If you’re fast afoot, things are probably pretty ok inside. If you’re not, think about changing your approach to life with an ongoing consideration of brain health. I offer advice about this in a book I wrote called Soft Wired which you can find on Amazon. You need to adopt a life of continuous new learning. You need to challenge your brain to improve the very elementally faculties that control the speed, accuracy, and reliability of its operations. Even if you’re very slow and losing it, the brain is usually capable of relatively strong, even dramatic, restoration. I believe that recovery of speed with sustained accuracy is a pretty strong biomarker of recovered organic brain health.

Final point: If you have confirmation that you carry the APOe4 marker, take brain health exercises especially seriously. You should be working everyday deploying strategies designed to sustain the elaborated, healthy, high-speed operation of your brain.

A:

I was just seeing if I could make that square go away but I can't oblivion then.


Q:

New Jersey - John & Matt

A:

i have never caught a show, and i would love to be able to catch one, one of these days...


Q:

Dollar amounts tend to catch the eye of a reviewer first, and I would always include them if it is not confidential information.

Generally it is recommended practice to include 2-3 KPIs for each role, so including supplementary numbers on resources and staff is a positive!

A:

Thank you for the kind comment.

A lot of the kids I grew up with also suffer from PTSD or other forms of mental illness due to the shooting. We've all graduated now and have moved on, but it's still a very strong thought in our minds. I can't speak for everyone though.


Q:

What kind of music do you listen to? Is it difficult for you to enjoy music the way everyone else does because you've analyzed its effects so much?

Unrelated question: In your opinion, where do you see artificial intelligence realistically getting to in 20 years? Could artificially intelligent beings enjoy music the way we do?

A:

Do you think it's to late to change your characters name on SDRR to Lards Ulrich?


Q:

I used to be deep in the whole nutrition/homeopathy cult and now I tend to discount anything that even remotely sounds like woo. So I can't tell you how much it bothers me that every article I've seen on mindfulness meditation shows it produces positive changes in the brain as determined through fMRI studies in illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and chronic pain. Could you elaborate on how a simple exercise of consciously focusing on your breath with a quiet mind is able to change how the brain unconsciously handles business?

A:

How did you decide to dedicate yourself to a career in animation as opposed to non-animated films?


Q:

What year does the bending unit come out? I'm thinking of preordering but idk

A:

Thank you for doing this AMA and for being so personal in communication with your fanbase!! We appreciate the self-written letters on your website and the Twitter DM's from time to time :)

  1. What kind of zany happenings in the crowd have caught your eye while performing up on stage? Curious how things are from your perspective at an event.
  2. Will we ever see another Bassnectar tour in the future? This would be a blessing to all of us commonly stuck at home due to life/work/school/responsibility etc.

Q:

Thanks for doing this again! I'm in the process of reworking my resume and it's a struggle.

How do I illustrate that I want a company that's willing to teach and train me in my industry, without sounding like I'm incompetent?

A:

What are your thoughts on gun control and mental health care before and after the shooting?


Q:

I listen to all kinds of music. I honestly don't remember how I used to listen to music, but I think I actually enjoy it more because I work so much with music. In fact in one study, we found evidence that people with moderate experience making music have greater activation in neural pleasure centers than people with little or no experience.

A:

You're too wordy. Have someone punch that up and get back, there's something there


Q:

The brain has evolved strategies to control its state of arousal and alertness, flexibly living from a high-alert to a pensive thoughtful, quiet pre-sleep moment. The ideal brain can move under direct control to deal with high operational powers on either the quiet or the lively, active, noisy sides of life. Many people struggle in controlling their reactivity in managing to operate effectively in a noisy higher-anxiety world. One of my favorite studies of meditation was conducted in a wonderful laboratory at the U of Wisconsin to determine whether or not meditation altered processes that impacted anxiety or arousal in the brain. The initial study indicated that the responses recorded in practiced meditators were no different in control subjects. Surprised by this outcome, the researchers looked at the responses of individuals who sought meditation training. They immediately discovered that their machinery was distorted and sustained their ongoing higher-anxieties. When they were trained their brains were dramatically changed in the normal-ward direction. Because these shifts in neurological engagement are so powerful it’s a great advantage for a brain to be able to move at will to a quiet, uncluttered, thoughtful, highly-focused mode. If you practice this as a habit, you have the power to move from active engagement in the world to the thoughtful quiet moment. And you’re far better off for it. Not every citizen needs to engage in meditation practices but if you’re on the anxious side of life, it might be a very useful aspect of how you think about neurological self-improvement.

We’ve conducted several studies, and are conducting an ongoing study in an aging population, on the separate and integrated benefits of meditation and brain training. Everything to this point indicates that they might have even more value together. A holistic approach might be greater than the sum of the parts in at least many individuals.

A:

somewhat accidentally, It started with a crush on Sue Bachmin, who was taking an animation class (isn't that how many things start) but then I made my first animated and when I played it in a room full of people I realized that the assembly of people taking in a piece of art is what I wanted, I did live action film, video, and performance, but animation was in many ways what people responded to the most, and granting agencies also, so it became my trade, it is lovely and very painful also. your mind is going like a bird, and your images develope as slow as trees. I love the feeling of losing yourself in a crowd that is experiencing the same thing you are, and letting your Ego quiet down and just take something in, I like being on both sides of the screen the melter, and the melted.


Q:

That's an Elon Musk question. - John

A:

Thank you! :)

  1. when you say 'zany' do you mean insane? or explicit? perverted? righteous? stupefying? unbelievable? awesome? its an absolutely INSANE view, but honestly i am very busy up there, and every set is over in the blink of an eye. its like multitasking and sprinting and hyperventilating and day dreaming in FAST FORWARD while the world slips into slow motion...very trippy! its always nice to see smiles and its awesome to watch the crowd heave and churn as one unified being

  2. the question of a Bassnectar Tour...thats a long answer. I gotta say our tours evolved into something so special and unpredictable, and for many years both state of the art and WAY ahead of its time [aka eons before 'dubstep' or 'edm'] ...we basically started touring as a rock band in like 2005... before that for about 10 years most of what i did was grass roots and self booked. in the 90's i did not have a manager or agent, and i was mostly focused on making events happen [we did free outdoor fullmoon events everymonth on the beach or in the woods] and making music for fun, not really to DJ. when i would play a set it was super organic, and never on a stage or anything... at the turn of the century burningman was exploding as an out of this world canvas for me to paint on [as was Shambhala in Canada] and i started booking myself to fly out to play art parties in art wharehouses all over... i would play 150+ shows a year, mostly in small clubs or wharehouses. in 2003 i think i was in France, Germany, England, Ireland, Spain, New Zeland, Australia, Japan, and all over the states, but it was SUPER fucking low key and ULTRA underground.... by 2005 we started playing in rock clubs in the states, touring with a small crew as a rock band would [sound guy, tour manager, lighting dude, etc] and id be doing a pizza parlor in Arkasa on a Tuesday, some weird rock club in Tennessee on a Wednesday, off to Mississippi for a Thursday night in like a dorm room, etc etc... and then that just got more and more intense for 10 years straight

the last time we did an actual TOUR was 2014 when we played Madison Square Garden and at that point it was SUCH an undertaking, and so exhausting and so expensive [its unbelievably expensive to haul 4 or 5 semi trucks full of gear with 2 massive tour busses, and 25 crew members, plus plus plus alll over the place, and set up a show, run a show, tear down an show and COMMUTE] 5 or 6 times a week... it was just loco

maybe i will do it again, but the way i have it dialed now is WAY more fun, and WAY more inspiring....

and honeslty a lot of my focus this year is about taking off the bassnectar suit and exploring life off grid as a human... then when i come back on grid its super full power and stunning as an experience...and again insnaely inspiring

:)


Q:

Hi kiranrs!

Interesting question...this sounds like something you would mention in a cover letter or introduction instead of your resume. Are you using an objective in your resume? I would encourage you not to; professional summaries have replaced objectives over the past few years.

Training and professional development are highly dependent on the culture of the company. I would suggest getting through to the interview stage and then seeing if they are a good fit for you. If your background is completely unrelated to the field, you'll have to do a lot of research to properly be considered.

For example, if a candidate is looking to break into the field of finance but lacks experience, he/she must write the resume to highlight tangential skillsets, informal education, and side passion projects related to finance. No doubt it is very challenging to start from scratch, but you should not mention you are completely raw and need to learn on the job!

A:

I struggle with forming an opinion on gun control, honestly that mostly stems from not being super educated on the subject.

As far as mental health goes, I think they did all they could after the shooting. Nobody really knew what was best for everyone.


Q:

Why do some people have perfect pitch?

A:

how's your knee man?


Q:

I apologize if this is somewhat broad, but could you discuss the role of neurotrophic factors in plasticity and adult neurogenesis?

A:

Thanks for taking your time in this AMA! I'm an animation student from a country where animation has no future, any advice on how to obtain a job in animation in America? I mean, obtain it while living in another country. Is it worth it to immigrate first in other thing and then apply for animation jobs? Or should I be noticed somehow? How?


Q:

Bill West, do you think you'll sound like the Professor when you're an old, senile, 160 year old man?

I'm a HUGE fan of your work by the way sir. And Jon.

A:

Why were you not on the Shambhala 20th anniversary lineup this year?


Q:

This seems to me like a common situation but one that I can never find a good answer for: I'm currently switching careers after twelve years as a licensed massage therapist. I'm doing excellent (4.0) in my studies and my major is computer engineering (beginning jr year this fall).

I know it's important that I have internships to fill out "related" work experience on my resume, and I've also heard the mantra that "just showing you can hold a job is a good thing," and certainly my employment history shows that, my work history includes two positions that I stayed at for over five years and have glowing references from. I'm also doing personal projects with hardware and software and documenting them to put on a sort of resume/portfolio website for when I begin applying for internships and jobs.

So here's my concern: I'm worried that by having what's perceived as either such a blue-collar service industry (at best) or "wacky new agey" (at worst) previous career that I won't be taken seriously by prospective employers. I'm worried that despite a solid education at a good school and with (hopefully) some internship experience that they will see the words "massage therapist" and go "what is she doing applying for this engineering position?"

How would you approach a situation like mine? What advice can you give? I can write a damn good cover letter, but I'm hoping for some insight beyond "just lay it out in the cover letter." I honestly wish I could ignore my previous career entirely on my resume without making it look like I sat on my butt doing nothing for the last twelve years.

A:

What are your thoughts on School Shooting Memes?


Q:

I wish I knew. From a neuroscientific perspective, I think that the most interesting question is why doesn't everyone have perfect pitch (we call it absolute pitch, by the way). In your brain their are spatial maps of frequency ... the same frequency will always activate the same neurons. So ... why don't we all have absolute pitch? Instead most people have relative pitch, but as far as I am aware, no one has ever found a map pf relative pitch. That's the real mystery to me.

Anyway, some people have argued that absolute pitch is learned. It is true, for example, that tone-language speakers (for example, Mandarin) have a higher rate of absolute pitch that non tone language speakers (for example, English). We are still in the early stages of understanding the brain mechanisms behind this.

My friend Dan Levitin has shown that the average person has something like absolute pitch and absolute rhythm as well. If you bring someone into the lab and ask them to hum their favorite song, most people get darn close in pitch and tempo.

A:

I broke my knee dude


Q:

Neurtrophins are key enablers of plasticity and sustained brain health. Measures of neurotrophins are canaries in the coalmine for determining the physical and functional status of your brain health. In almost every clinical indication, in which people are neurologically and psychiatrically struggling, the production of these “growth factors” is downregulated. And in condition after condition, that relatively consistent finding has led to the hypothesis that that downregulation is central to all kinds of neurological weaknesses and diseases. Healthy brains make more neurotrophins. When we exercise the brain extensively, we need upregulation of neurotrophins and once it’s upregulated we see that its production is sustained over the longer term. Neurotrophins are one of the primary chemical indices we use – on that long list of chemical and physical changes in brains – to demonstrate that we have driven the brain in a positive brain-health-recovery direction.

I could of course talk about this in a lot more depth in a nerdy extension in neuroscience. If you’re interested in that ask me a follow-up question privately.

A:

The great thing about the animation world, is that it is an international world, and you can reach out wit ha film and be heard in other countries, the most lo fi kind of film you can make (equipment wise), is stop motion . with single frames on any devise. Most important , make something amazing.. also check out sites like Cartoon Brew, all the information on festivals and artists there, also I love animate projects, website from Britain.


Q:

Well, let's see. I'm 65 and I can do a 25 year-old's voice...so by 160 I shouldn't have a problem doing the voice of a 120 year-old. - BW

A:

we had other plans but i've played 12 or 13 of them, and am DEAR FRIENDS with dozens of the humans who work on that each year, we will be back again and again in the future...there is no place like Shambhala, no place like the Kootenays :)


Q:

Hi! We recently had a candidate in a similar situation -- he was a field engineer for an oil company for 15+ years and decided to pursue software engineering. He's been fortunate to land a new role, but what was most effective for him was sending emails en masse to hiring managers. Your background may be interesting to a variety of startups, for example.

What's great about engineering is the interview process is more meritocratic than most -- there's a fairly standard set of technical screens and tests you'll want to prepare for.

A:

I don't really have an opinion about them either way, I try to laugh about it but it always kinda sends me back for a second.


Q:

Have you researched the effects of very low frequencies?
Have your peers replicated your research?

A:

Yeah, how's your knee dude?


Q:

Can a neurological condition like ASD impact neuroplasticity (or vice versa)? If so, how?

A:

Thank you for this AMA, very interesting answers!

I am wondering how did you finance your first projects and how are you funding your current projects? Only through kickstarter?

thx!


Q:

What was the inspiration for Zapp Brannigan? And what led to giving him no pants (genius by the way).

A:

When is the next mixtape coming out?!?! Mixtape 13 wasn't a "real" mixtape like your old ones were, and the Night Owl Radio one was more of a podcast and radio show. I want Immersive Music part 3 or a massive Reflective mixtape!!! Please and thank you :D.

Much love from Ohio.


Q:

Is there a common mistake that a lot of people make when looking for a new job?

A:

Why did that teacher not let you go? Were you not close to being out and safe?


Q:

What do you mean by "very low"?

In 1999 we published a paper theorizing that neural oscillations synchronize to music and speech rhythms. Now, the are literally 100's of papers that report observations of "neural entrainment" as it has come to be called in the literature. These studies are being conducted in labs all over the world.

A:

I broke my knee dude, it's doing fine


Q:

Scientists have extensively studied the genetic bases of ASD and they have shown that it can involve aspects of the plasticity processes themselves. Because the genetics of origin of ASD are so complicated it is not at all clear that this is always the case but we know that it can apply in some ASD individuals. At the same time, ASD individuals have very plastic brains. Plasticity is the brain’s big trick and it takes a lot to completely block or frustrate it. We’ve trained tens of thousands of individuals in the ASD spectrum using our computer-based training strategies and we’ve been repeatedly struck by their capacity to learn, advance, and improve in their operational abilities for the better. Sometimes these changes are completely transformative. They’re almost always helpful. There aren’t very many brains in the world in which plasticity cannot by engaged to change a life very much for the better.

You can send me a note for more details if you have a specific subclass of ASD in mind.

Edit: added last sentence.

A:

my other projects where funded by art grants and my job, but the last three grants I recieved, where once in a life time Grants, so there is no returning to them, I think this is actually good. but I have to find other means.


Q:

He was based on a few big dumb announcers that I used to hear when I was growing up who would make a one syllable word into four to fill the air with their beautiful, wonderful, dumb voices. - BW

A:

the technical answer is that technology is changing and i can't tell where someone is allowed to post a "real" mixtape... to me mixtapes are CHALK FULL of samples, just like DJ sets are, and you just mix music the fuck up hella freestyle and have fun. but now you can't really post that anywhere without getting takedowns, so... find a place to post them and ill post them :)

otherwise im just making mixtapes live each night when i play a set

every single one is super creative and freestyle and i'm editing or remixing or remastering EVERY track i play

alot of times ill do an edit and someone will say "this sounds just like the original" and im like SMH... dude slap the 2 versions into a sequencer and A-B compare them

i put IMMENSE work and time into crafting custom designs on any song i play, always working to make the heaviest, warmest, deepest version possible... so live sets have really become my new playground for mixtapes :)


Q:

A big mistake is not doing sufficient research on the new company/position that they are looking to fill. This can cause blunders during the interview if you're asked specific questions about the position and the mission of the company, i.e. "why do you want to work HERE?" and it could also lead to regret if you aren't really sure what you are getting yourself into when making a transition into a new job.

A:

I think it's was part of the procedure to just get as many kids inside and in a locked classroom.


Q:

Is there a link to specific moods reached with certain neural oscillations?

Tibetan Monks come to mind, those who reach a type of "nirvana" when making the ohm sound.

A:

Do you really need 12 open mic comics on the same podcast?


Q:

My father died from Alzheimer’s. Per your intriguing intro, will you help us understand how to throw the switch? What, exactly, should we be doing to sustain or even grow our abilities, to successfully manage our organic brain health, to improve our lot in life, and keep ourselves safer? Thank you!

A:

With Futurama leaving Netflix, I can't believe I must revert to using my DVDs. So, my question is this: What is this, the middle ages?!

Also: with Futurama off the air, what's it like being a bunch of total Zoidbergs; desperately poor AND miserably lonely?

EDIT: Rad! Thanks David.


Q:

Do you ever get tired/embarrassed/frustrated with your hardcore fan base and some of the shenanigans that they pull?

A:

I'm in Seattle, and there is a lot of work available and there are a number of staffing companies, especially in IT. However, there seems to be a real disconnect between what recruiters think a job entails, and what the hiring manager is looking for. Here are some questions related to that issue:

  • Why do businesses generate such long and convoluted requirements for their positions, when they are really just looking for someone who can quickly adapt, onboard in a convenient timeframe and operate semi-autonomously?

  • What is the most common X-factor omitted by managers and applicants?

  • Are jobs morphing to match human requirements, or are humans compensating to meet job requirements? Can big-data assist in niche-matching position requirements with not only profiles, but personalities?


Q:

Thank you for sharing this, even though i know this is hard for you. Your story is so strong that it made me cry on the metro. I just want to say that your'e an survivor, you're strong, and you're loved. And trust me, I know it is difficult to feel like it. My question is harsh and i don't know if I should even ask this, but here we go.

Have you ever felt driven to suicide?

Best of luck in your life, i promise it will get better <3

Edit: Spelling

A:

One of my students and wrote a paper in which we speculate about that. The idea we proposed was that neural synchrony with musical gives rise to musical qualia (feelings) including tonal and temporal expectancies, and that music-synchronous responses couple into core neurodynamics, enabling music to directly modulate core affect (the feelings associated with emotions).

We do not yet understand the nature of the coupling, but this is exactly what we are working on now.


Q:

First of all, no. Second of all, I only have 3 comics on - 3 limit.

They're not open mics, they're middlers

A:

We’ve conducted series of studies in animal models in which we’ve studied brains near the end of the animal’s life and contracted a long list of physical, chemical, and functional brain assets to the status of those assets in the brains of young adult animals in their “prime of life”. In those studies we’ve asked: “What’s different?” The answer: everything. Then we ask, “What’s stronger in an old brain?” Answer: nothing. Old brains are less reliable. They’re slower, less intact, less well-served by the vasculature of the brain. They’re less responsive to immunological challenge. They disconnect, simplify, chemically degrade, reduce in sophistication, dis-elaborate, and lose attentional control. Then we ask, “How many of these assets that distinguish very old brain from prime of life brains can be overcome by brain training?” The answer is all of them.

What do I need to do to drive these changes? Do I have a brain that looks like it’s approaching the cliff?

First of all, calibrate yourself. I recommend considering your brain speed as an index of your brain health, just as it provides an index of an animal’s brain health. When the brain is operating at speed with high reliability it means that your positive switch is still on. If you’re problem-solving and if you’re fast in mental operations then you’ve sustained your competitive edge. If you recognize any slowing at all and if your grandchild can now whoop you at a game then you probably need some serious brain work. If your situation is still relatively positive you can accomplish keeping yourself in a safe position by adopting natural lifestyle changes. If your situation is a little more questionable you might consider engaging in progressive computerized exercises designed to drive your brain speed and accuracy back to a youthful performance level. Fortunately, these elemental abilities are plastic and strong rejuvenation is commonly achievable. I don’t want to be too promotional but another simple thing you could do is visit BrainHQ.com and compare your performance to others in your age group.

In the ACTIVE trial computerized brain exercises focused on processing accuracy at speed were applied in a controlled trial conducted more 15 years ago. At the beginning of the trial the average age was around 74. Individuals who trained for 10 hours at the trial outset, then an additional 2-4 hours a year later and an additional 2-4 two years after that had strong improvement in everyday life. They were more active in their communities and had only around half as many driving accidents. They were significantly less likely to develop senior depression and significantly more likely to sustain effective control of their everyday lives. Ten years after training initiation and 7 years after the last “dose” of brain training (they only received 14-18 hours overall), scientists asked: “What happened to these people? What was their fate?” The answer: 48% fewer had developed dementia than in the random-assigned control population. While these studies are preliminary they’re consistent with our perspective that recovering and sustaining high-speed high-accuracy performance in a brain is a very good thing for all concerned. My guess is that this includes you.

P.S. on BrainHQ the exercise used in the ACTIVE trial is called “Double Decision”. This task was developed by Karlene Ball from UMB and Daniel Roenker UWK.


Q:

On a related note, I was re-watching some of the old episodes recently and enjoying seeing the various outdated technologies like floppy disks and VCRs that they still use in the year 3000. But it's also very confusing because I remember that even then, we were writing some of those things into the scripts because they were ALREADY comically outdated and we thought it was funny. But now I can't remember which ones were hilariously outdated and which ones were just the actual cutting-edge technologies of the time. The information has gone into a black hole. - David X. Cohen

A:

honestly i LOVE the enthusiasm of the bassnectar community. i have never seen anything like it in my life and i am so proud and honored by what has so organically developed and evolved.

There are elements of the punk rock scene and even the death metal scene from my high school days, where nerds and rejects and outcasts and people who don't belong find a home, find common threads.

there are elements of Insane Clown Posse, The Grateful Dead, and Phish, where totally different people from totally different walks of life find common themes of passion and joy and develop a family which gathers to celebrate those common themes.

there are elements of my own day dreams of art colonies and cultish communes where strangers and artist collaborate and interact in some kind of Science Fiction utopia to make reality into a interactive work of art.

But all the while the people are so genuine and gentle and respectful and diverse.

As with any large, anarchic group of people, there is a spectrum of behavior... and i have always encouraged people to be INCLUSIVE and ACCEPTING so any random person can show up and act like a clown but in general i am constantly humbled by how kind and loving everyone is

An din comparison to the PHONY mass-marketed mainstream fan bases out there, this is so genuine... its made of humans, who like you and me, are imprefect and constantly growing and learning

i know anyone reading this has made stupid mistakes, thought stupid thoughts, tried dumb things, and lived to tell about it... that's life

but it's FAKE NEWS to say bassnectar fans are anything but ultra amazing, dedicated, beautiful... that comes from jealous haters, or wannabees..that comes from someone who wishes life was different and tries to tear down something else which is beautiful. and i have love for those people, but no patience for their fake news.

For any random story about this or that conflict, there are THOUSANDS of stories of random acts of kindness, of loving friendships which have formed, of deep and meaningful experiences

and that's beautiful :)

compared to any fanbase of a sports team, or any group at a college or university, or any fanbase of a musical act, it's a non issue, if you have been a member of the community you know this is special.

and just as with anything [Burningman, high school, Phish, Metallica, hip hop, college football, casions in Las Vegas, taverns in Holland, traffic jams in New York City, beaches in Miami, movie theatres in Colorado, shopping malls in Seattle, forests in vancouver, whatever] as with anything there is a myriad of behavior

there are REALLY nice people, there are outspoken people, there are shy people, there are inexperienced newbies, and tired old veterans, there are high octane OVERLY INSPIRED enthusiasts, and there are poeple who are moving on to new things

so as with any community YOU HAVE THE POWER to influence, and when you see newcomers, greet them with love, and when you see negativity, either extinguish it with love, or leave the scenario

one thing i can say is if you want to feel happier:

spend less time online

spend less time posting statuses of yourself

spend less time trying to broadcast

spend less time complaining about negative things

spend less time trying to call someone out for mistakes they made

spend less time listening to those who have no credibility

spend more time tuning into sources of thought or information who have EARNED credibility, who are authentic and trustworthy

spend more time interacting with live humans who live their lives in ways YOU want to live yours

be friends with people who have personalities which are like WHAT YOU WANT TO BECOME

spend more time giving and less time taking

and buckle up for a long, strange, beautiful ride :)


Q:

This question itself is complex enough it could become it's own reddit thread =)

I'll offer another perspective:

With the average job posting receiving over 300 applications, companies have convoluted requirements on purpose -- to filter candidates. Yes, it's frustrating -- but unfortunately, companies are incentivized to make it difficult to apply to a position.

A:

Heavy question.

The answer, sadly, is yes.

Not directly driven from the idea of the shooting itself, but from the PTSD that has come from it.

Thank you very much for your kind words.


Q:

Where would you hide 1,000,000 dollars cash if you absolutely had to?

A:

How hot does magnesium burn?


Q:

I do my own neurorehab using physical activity and using my own system for biofeedback (Heart Rate, skin respons, Blood glycos,muscle control) and I notice a correlation between having a sharp mind and getting better muscle control or not being able to think and no power to the muscles.

Basically I use existing physical activities with a different low load profile short duration, pacing, Heart Rate zone and daily repetition combined with extreme loading that forces shutdown muscles to engage.

Does it exits "neuro plastic" research that evaluate best practice physical training methods ?

My ANS function is effected and my sensory brain / vision/hearing is a limiting factor. Adjusted physical activity reduces pain and stiffness for me. How can physical activity/training replace computer based for brain plasticity training?

A:

On the episode "Fear of a Bot Planet", the mayor remarks that it's been 146,000 days of the annual human hunt with no success, and they before mentioned the planet was taken over by robots 400 years prior.

146,000 days equals 400 years. Love the math jokes more than anything.


Q:

LORIN!!!! I've always wondered, what sort of diet do you follow? are you a vegetarian or vegan? What is your guilty pleasure in terms of unhealthy food that you like to indulge in every so often?

A:

At what point in someone's career is it considered worthwhile to go > 1 page on a resume? In the US, are CVs ever useful outside of academia in your opinion? What should be included on your resume if your work is more visual and lends itself to a portfolio better?


Q:

So first you're outside because of a fire alarm, then a couple minutes later you hear gunshots and start running towards the parking lot, then you're being grabbed and dragged into a classroom by a spanish teacher? Why would a teacher take someone outside running away from the school back inside towards the shooter??

A:

I don't know. Maybe I'd bury it?


Q:

First off, how do you spell magnesium. But if I were to guess approximately 3100 degrees celsius

A:

I strongly believe that time best spend from a brain perspective are exercises in which you’re increasing the power of the brain to control your physical actions. The brain’s role in your physical life is as a master controller of moving and acting. The more you can elaborate those powers while you’re engaging yourself physically, the better. A more common physical exercise strategy is to pound on aerobics with exercise machines that actually promote stereotypical actions and control. Unfortunately, you’re repeating the same cycle of movements over and over. It’s better to master highly flexible control because that’s the form of engagement, command, and control that you brain was actually designed for. You want to engage your body at every speed and position possible. Go off-trail biking or skiing, walk barefoot across an uneven landscape, play a net game that increases in speed and difficulty. Any exercise form in which your movements begin slow and ultimately become fast and elaborated will help. At the same time, physical exercise does not provide all of the brain exercise that you need.

People that have substantial visual or auditory impairment are limited in the capacity to change their brain for the better, just like people who can’t control their actions. Every individual who finds themselves in this situation has to take brain exercises especially seriously. It’s wonderful that you instinctively understand this and are acting upon it on the basis of that understanding. Keep it up.

P.S. If you tell me a little bit more about the nature of your visual and auditory impairment then I may be able to provide additional information.


Q:

Can't write Futurama without a calculator! - David X. Cohen

A:

i grew up in a commune and my parents ran a health food store, then in high school i started smoking weed and eating junk food, then when i was 17 or 18 i became a vegetarian, more for political reasons, and started going back into ultra health food, i quit smoking pot, i lost any interest in getting faded or high [except i LOVE strong green tea, and i like a good glass of wine at the right time]

mornings i like 2 poached eggs, steamed spinach, and brutally strong green tea

lunch is mellow and whatever, salad, or something basic

dinner ideally is wild rice, ginger, organic chicken, steamed greens

but i also do eat out quite a lot while travelling, and like to try new foods :)

i love health food :)


Q:

Good q's - rule of thumb is if >10 years of experience, 2 pages is OK, but US preferences will always be 1 page - CV's only if you are published - If you're in the design/creative space, portfolios are expected. Make sure you have a separate document that can parse through the automated screens on job apps though.

A:

I'm sorry, I didn't really explain the schools layout.

We were an outdoor campus, so everything was outside until you entered a lunchroom or classroom. I wanted to go to the parking lot because it seemed the safest to me because the shooter was inside the lunchroom. The teacher grabbed me and pulled me inside, thinking it would be safer than running outside where the shooter could run out of the lunchroom and hurt me too.


Q:

Hi Bobby. I hope the answer to this is yes. Do you ever think about your miserable childhood and how your mother literally gave you away and get so sad that you eat even though you aren't hungry?

A:

What do you think of neuroprotective mechanisms following injury to the brain? Be it a concussion, stroke, or cardiac arrest, there have been studies showing a delayed onset of symptoms, approximately a day or two after injury. How do you think the brain is responding to this? Or, why do you think this delay happens? Sorry if this is too broad. Thanks!


Q:

Thank you guys for never truely letting this show die. As a fan it is great to see the people who made it care as much as the fans, even years after it ended.

My question is more of a plea: Will you please release an official Comrade Greeting Card. I have been sending my mom gifts with that poem on it for years, and I need an actual card to give to her. Also, Who wrote the birthday song?

A:

Hi Lorin! Huge fan, can't wait to see you at Bisco & I was at Basslantic City which was also fucking amazing.

I was just wondering with how long you have been producing.

  1. How many GB/TB of unreleased music do you have? (Rough Estimate?)

  2. Has the evolution of technology made it easier for you to create the music that you do? (Compared to 10+ years ago)

  3. How have I seen you 5 times live and you have never once dropped "Loco Ono"? When was the last time you played that in a set?

Can't thank you enough for the AMA


Q:

Make sure you have a separate document that can parse through the automated screens on job apps though

Can you elaborate on that?

A:

Your wish is granted. Yes


Q:

When you have a concussive injury, or a stroke, or often when you have a heart attack or heart failure, or spend a period in the ICU of a day or more and you suffer from delirium, these are commonly expressed by a compromise of the blood-brain barrier. The blood-brain barrier seals off the brain compartment from the blood compartment, which is important for brain function in two ways. First, chemical agents from blood change the excitability of brain tissues, and thereby disable them functionally. They radically increase the noisiness of the brain and the brain rapidly adjusts to this change by plastically changing its speed of operations. In all of these conditions, brain slowing is the signature aspect of the incurred impairments. It has to slow down to sustain control. A break in the blood brain barrier also enables the passage of infectious agents from blood to directly enter brain tissue. The brain responds by walling off viruses and bacteria, with amyloid – a natural brain chemical which helps protect the brain. Unfortunately, by that protection, it creates an inclusion called an amyloid body, which is a forerunner—an expression – of impending Alzheimer’s disease. This is why all of these conditions increase the risk of an earlier onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Basically, especially in older brains, they initiate the processes that put it into play. It is very important that you do whatever you can to sustain the integrity of your blood brain barrier!

We are conducting trials at Vanderbilt University in which we are trying to help people who have a scheduled serious surgical procedure in which we anticipate a likely compromise of their blood-brain barrier. We know that the barrier is plastic, and we know that we can probably increase its resilience to breakdown when it is put through the strings of a long and elaborate surgical operation. We will know soon whether we can decrease the probability of its compromise as a consequence of an individual going through this body and brain altering experience. We have also been applying training in individuals that have suffered from concussion and stroke as well as individuals who have been through a period of delirium in ICU, with one of our objectives being the restoration of the integrity of the blood brain barrier.

When most people think about brain remodeling or brain recovery conferred by intensive training, they think about it in neurological terms. It turns out that something is different about a relationship between the vascular supply to the tissue to the brain and the brain tissues themselves is also plastic, and can be very positively impacted by the right forms of intensive training. In an individual that is struggling because of such a history, the training has a dual purpose: a recovering high speed, high accuracy performance characteristics, and restoring this very special vascular to brain tissue relationship.

A:

(Birthday song) Group effort by the staff. But Patric Verrone gets the check!!! >John


Q:

hey dude :) thank you! unfinished miusical ideas? TONS on my PC i have enough to make several albums, but its just too messy to finish anything... its like wandering through an old photo album or getting lunch with a best friend you havent seen in years, its overwhelming

technology: yes, god bless its heart

Loco Ono: that's strange, because i drop one of 4 versions pretty often. the original is very noisy and bezerk, i collaborated with Stylust Beats on a heavy lower octave version which i play alot, and JCO made a groovy version i just played last weekend :)

almost every track i play is subkect to heavy sampling though, so i love to sample the vocals from one track, or the instrumental from another, or the sound effects from another, etc :)

A:

Certainly! Most companies use applicant tracking systems (ATS) to manage their hiring pipeline. When you go through a job application and see that certain fields are automatically filled out for you based on your resume, that's when you know your resume is being parsed properly.

However, if you're in a field that requires portfolios, you need human eyes. Email, email, email! Follow-ups are not considered rude, and jobseekers tend to be too shy.


Q:

Is there a correlation between rising ocean levels and your wading in the shallows?

A:

You don't literally mean the eye poking, do you?


Q:

What the hell does "nine, ten, a big fat hen—the name's Bender" mean?

A:

For those of us that can't make it out to Colorado in time for Freestyle, what can we expect at Bass Center X?? Any NYE clues? 😋


Q:

How long should I keep putting Eagle Scout on my resume before it begins to seem old/childish?

A:

Fb fans are awesome, reddit fans are trolls with different names. I get it, it's a moon joke. I'm as big as a planet, I get it


Q:

No, I do not literally mean eye-poking. I mean generating high-level stress in your life by their actions. Maybe they’re bullying you, maybe they’re abusing you, maybe they’re punishing you when it's not fair, maybe you know or believe the teacher thinks you’re a little loser, maybe no one wants to be your friend, maybe your mom wishes you weren’t underfoot, maybe things are really going badly almost everyday in the home you live in. All of things fall within my eye-poking category.

A:

It means we were stuck on a line for awhile, and Bender had to get us out of the scene. If you were looking for deeper meaning, look elsewhere. - writers


Q:

Bass Center is without a doubt the creative pinnacle of the year for my entire team!!!! It wasn't always like that but after last year, it really became a chance for me to take the deepest dive possible into 'bassnectar' and reinvent it live while ripping into the past and flinging it into the future. its like the quintessential "ok i am involved in every tiny aspect of this event" so i just obsessssssssss over it

i'm talking OBSESSIVE. COM. PULSIVE. so im basically just terrorizing my team for a year about this event. and ironically, lots goes right, lots goes 'wrong' and lots of stuff which goes not as planned ends up better than planned... this year our chocolate didnt show up and got melted, but we got a great new twist on it through the chocolate making team for next year

but im getting distracted.. bass center: yeah so i am like working nonstop hours with the lighting team, designing how to approach the room into the exact visual experience we want, going into the greeters, and the team who works the door, working on the lines, making the outside 'line' area blend into a larger kind of event carnival, maybe kind of like a Grateful Dead lot of the 1990's meets an ICP show, meets a free outdoor day party in Golden Gate Park... so we are working on every tiny element, plus we have musical guests who i am just RABID about

and taking over Labor Day weekend [likely will not happen again] is unique because its 3 nights of intensive activity, and we are basically planning shenanigans from Friday Morning through to Sunday Morning...

then in terms of the music...for anyone who is like "why dont you tour anymore" ...those three nights are like fucking tour.

when i used to tour I would have an A set and a B set, and i would alternate each night, back and forth. there would be some creative flexibility from set to set, but for the most part the 'tracklist' of A set was very similar. and the "B" set was very similar

for Bass Center, across three nights, I will conjur up 3 totally distinct sets which feel like the full throttle tour sets, which a totally unique and independant of each other, with all my favorite music, remixed into new versions, going NUTSO on the request line, and basically taking every request that comes in...with a twist :)

i was just really excited about last year's event...beyond excited by it. and i am SO fucking amped to return to Hampton Coliseum again, that room CRUSHES... the floor is so massive, and we are making the stands wrap around so you can spend the whole night running in circles if you wish :)

but actually fuck all that, dont expect anything, just come join us and dive in deep :)

A:

If the skills you gained/used as a scout are relevant to the position that you are applying to, it's fine to keep it on if you highlight how it makes you a better candidate for the job. If it's just extraneous information about your extracurricular involvement, it's not necessary to include in your resume.


Q:

Is this your year? Are you finally going to make it?

A:

Hello Dr. Merzenich. Can neural feedback sessions correct ASD and ADHD symptoms in adolescents? What is your view of the Qeeg as a valid test for understanding what aspects of the brain need treatment?


Q:

What is the favourite musical number that you've recorded for the show? I'm a big fan of the Devil song with the Beastie Boys

A:

Have been tuned in for a little over a decade now and have gotten to witness your projects beautiful metamorphosis. As more people have also tuned in, the events your team has organized in the past 5 years or so have generally tended to be much larger in scale and less frequent; necessitating people “comin from miles around” to share in the experience.

 

What would your sentiments be regarding community members organizing small “Bass Center” inspired events, where local Bassheads, visual artists, VJs, musicians, and DJs can share their love for the project by working together to curate their best version of a “Bassnectar” event?


Q:

My mom has been unemployed for more than a year, and simply can't seem to find a job. She sends out applications all day, gets interviews, and has been a final candidate on several occasions, but she still hasn't landed a job. She's 58 years old with many years of journalism/communication experience, and has won multiple awards for her writing, so her resume is quite impressive. She and I both believe that there may be some ageism at hand, though of course we can't be sure. What are some things she may be able to do when applying and interviewing for jobs that could help her stand out amongst younger candidates with similar resumes?

A:

No, absolutely not


Q:

The scientific reviews about the clinical uses of biofeedback for individuals with ADHD and ASD are mixed. Some reviews strongly support arguments about its effectiveness; an equally large number emphasis its lack of impacts in these and other subject populations. In my view, it is still somewhat of an art form; in the hands of an enlightened practitioner, it may be very beneficial. But how do you know that your child has been delivered to an enlightened practitioner? That remains a problem.

On the one hand, it would appear that in the right hands, biofeedback strategies can improve the control abilities that relate to ADHD. Things are a little more obscure for ASD, and it is more difficult to talk about it because the expressions of deficits in the ASD cohort are so dramatically variable. Biofeedback specialists have begun to use elementary strategies to map strengths of connectivity in brain systems as a source of insight for clinical manipulation (qEEG). It is too early to evaluate the practical utility of this integrated approach. At the same time, hypothetically, looking at connectivity maps is a not unreasonable initial strategy for generating a first-level understanding of neurological strengths and weaknesses. These strategies are rapidly evolving in application, and are likely to be more widely and intensively used in the immediate future.

A:

Singing with Beck was pretty killer. - John


Q:

i mean, any DIY events people want to produce amongst their friends: thats the beautiful anarchy of life... i hope its as raw and fun as the death metal and punk rock shows i used to organize in the public library basement when i was 16

:)

but as for people actually trying to emulate, or brand, or immitate, ...i think people can do better than that. don't try and create a bassnectar or bass center event.. create a YOU event.

dont grow your hair out and try and play music that sounds like bassnectar [grow your hair out and play music that sounds like YOU]..dont play rippoff 'tribute sets' for a band or music project that is still very active... make something new and fresh and meaningful

again, i dont mean that negatively, i am trying to encourage you that it will be more enjoyable and authentic and meaningful if you make it about YOU

everything is reflective. so obviously if you are influenced by 'bassnectar' thats great.. i bet you are influenced by a lot of things and a lot of music... stir that all up in a pot and let that be YOU

DIY art is where its at :)

A:

Joining a shrinking industry is definitely a challenge. Media & journalism has been disrupted heavily, and since we're in an age where no one is accustomed to paying for writing, I completely sympathize. If she's been a career journalist, then she'll have to rely on recommendations rather than cold applications to get through the final round.

We've seen folks pivot their media backgrounds into successful careers as marketing directors, B2B communications & strategy roles, and (more sales-y) account manager roles. PR is tricky since it involves maintaining your network, which at 58 may be too late to try. I would recommend she start branching out to companies that have a core enterprise business model (ie sells things to large companies) where they value a more experienced voice in the conference room. Best of luck!


Q:

Who were you more scared to sit next to at the Cellar table, Patrice or Colin?

A:

Hi, Dr Merzenich. I am a student practitioner of The Anat Baniel Method. I have heard you speak a couple of times. The last time I heard you speak, you were talking about reversing the negative brain changes that come with age. At the end of your lecture you said something to the effect of - What can change in the brain? Everything. - I was very encouraged, particularly because I have a 3 year old with an intellectual disability, due to a chromosomal deletion (5p minus syndrome). My question to you is, do you think that it is possible for a child with a genetic syndrome's brain to make the same type of changes, to the point where there is no longer an intellectual disability? Many thanks.


Q:

So, we know Mom's first name is actually Carol, but do her, Walt, Larry, and Igner have a last name?

A:

Do you have a hobby or interest non music related that you aren't super vocal about? For example, is there a secret knittingnectar or pastrychefnectar we don't know of? Also, gotta say thank you for bringing an amazing community together. I honestly believe the combination of the music and overwhelming support from the people I've met through this community have changed my life and made me a better person. Much love!


Q:

I am trying to get a job in a city and a country 3000 miles away(where I am originally from). At this point I am pretty sure my resume gets trash binned as soon as my address is seen. One imagines your clients encounter this and other similar problems as well, advice?

A:

Patrice cause he's dead


Q:

We have been interested in this specific deletion syndrome because it is of a not-infrequent occurrence, and because the expressions of ASD that arise from it are so dramatically variable. We have actually used computerized assessments to evaluate nearly 50 different elemental neurological faculties in children with this deletion to try to create a profile that was intended to describe what is common to all of these kids. What we see, in fact, is extraordinary diversity in the expression of deficits in this very intriguing child population. They raise the question: how can the same genetic deletion result in differences in phenotype that result in relatively mild to relatively severe cognitive impacts – a child that may be very “autistic” to only relatively mildly impacted?

There is an underlying related second question, and that is that we know that autism is strongly inherited; more than 70% of children with ASD with an identical twin, share ASD with that twin; but on the other hand, around 30% do not. So, how can it be that two genetically identical individuals with a strongly inherited disease, can differ so dramatically? One child, strongly negatively impacted; the second, primarily merely language delayed and impaired? This is a question that has interested my colleagues and I for a very long time. We have tried to address it in two ways. The first thing that we have tried to ask is, do these children have brains that have the normal capacities for improvement or change that apply for non-ASD children? While the plasticity control processes may differ in some ways, we have repeatedly seen that the brains of these children are highly plastic – just as in any other kid.

Second, we try to understand what the basis might be for the expression of a strong negative phenotype in one child genetically equivalent to a second child in which the phenotypic ASD is weak. To study this, we created an animal model whose brain is struggling in the listening domain, a core common deficit in ASD, and then we ask, “what environmental factors can very substantially add to the struggling brain of this inherently impaired child? We examined a total of 6 factors that were chosen, because we believe they have all grown in modern cultural environments across the last 35-40 years. You could say that what we are really trying to understand is not just what accounts for the variation in the penetrance in impacts in different genetically identical individuals, but also what could account for a clear, unequivocal increase in the percentage of children across the last 30-40 years identified as ASD. Our factors include: (1) poisoning the infant with a breakdown product from flame-retardant chemicals (the fluorinated equivalence of PCBs), (2) heavy exposure in the third trimester to repeated ultrasound examinations of the fetal head and brain, (3) perinatal exposure to heavy metals, (4) rapid cord clamping that results in inadequate delivery of hemoglobin from placental tissues into the infant and later to oxygen deprivation in the developing brain (5) exposure to continuous noise in the postnatal environment, as contrasted with raising the newborn infant in quiet, and (6) exposure of the mother to SSRIs. Every one of these added burdens contributed very significantly to the impairments that had been initiated by the initial insult. Put another way, a whole series of environmental factors are probably contributing to strength of ASD expression and to the increased probability that it is going to be a part of the child’s life.

For your child, the water is already over the dam. Whatever may have contributed to the child’s present neurological performance abilities is established and in place, which may mean that your child is off to a little more struggling beginning in life for nobody’s fault than was absolutely necessary. But, that child’s brain, like every other kid in the spectrum, is just beginning in life to organize itself and its powers. And, fantastic things can potentially come from it. Your job is to do everything you can to grow its powers and to help that child be somebody who is very special.

A final note, I admire Anat Baniel and the therapeutic strategies implemented by the Anat Baniel Method. You and I know that this provides another important source of insight to you in understanding how to help your kid.

A:

Patric Verrone wrote the episode in which Mom first appeared, and he named her Edna Miller (his mother's name). We changed the first name to Carol, so there you go. Another useless Futurama factoid! Sincerely yours, Matt


Q:

haha well, in terms of "my life outside of bassnectar" that is an entire universe i am VERY excited to explore! in 2015 I kind of had an American Beauty Moment... i felt like i had "been in a coma for about 20 years, and im just now waking up"...

i felt like i had been in a daze for 10 years and the world blurred past, and although i had lived every bassnectar dream and then some, i hadn't had much life outside of music. i am a total workaholic, and i eat, sleep and breathe bassnectar as a 'creative art project'...

i realized that 'bassnectar' was like a superman suit, and that i was just a mild mannered human, like Clark Kent. When i strapped on the suit i could fly through these crazy worlds, but i hadnt taked the suit off in ten years.

i didnt want to retire or give up or stop, i wanted to respect the power and integrity of the art... but i wanted to ALSO explore life as a human being

so instead of "turning down the intensity on bassnectar" i decided to leave it as it naturally is: pulsing with intensity!!! but to just spend less time of each year wearing the suit.

So if my life is a pie chart, each year 98% of the pie chart was Bassnectar, and 2% was left over for everything else. I made a goal to transform that to a 50/50 balance, so 50% of the time i could wear the suit, and during those times, it can blast as full on an intense as ever, but when i take it off, i can just be simple mild-mannered Clark Kent, and in those moments, i have no desire to broadcast my personality on social media or anything, i like to unplug

i love spending time with my family, who i love beyond words. i love spending time with dear friends, many of whom I have known for 20 years. i love learning and thinking. i love playing Pente. i loooove nature, and i love walking and exploring. i love meeting new people without introducing myself, just being kind to an old sweet gramma at a cafe, or a tired looking waiter at a restaurant... i love visiting with my neighbors, or studying and learning new things...i love thinking constructively, and creatively, and i love debate...i debate with myself or my friends a lot, because its a great way to improve you persepctive, by enriching it and scientifically testing your beliefs... i do it for fun, i watch documentaries..

i love playing Skyrim and Minecraft.

my dad said "there are only 2 things to do today: Relax and Be Kind" and i love that

he also said that aside from all the ever-changing advice you get from the world the 3 most important things each day for self care are getting enough sleep, eating a balanced diet, and excercise... so i focus on that as well

then again, although i took off a ton of time this winter, i was buried in the studio almost every day

i'm working on countless collaborations year round, im always messing around with old 'never-finished albums' on my old computers

im lovviiiiiing NAUX FAUX, which is a downtempo project i have with my friend Craig, i love working on music with Dorfex Bos, i love just jamming on new sounds and ideas for a few hours, then deleting the project and startin over again :)

lately, any time i hang with Dylan [ill Gates] instead of making music we just goof off, talk about life and the world, make each other laugh, record a bunch of noises and talk about music from a Present Past and Future approach, where nothing lasts, but everything is kind of existing in multiple states of existence

where was i?

oh yah...hobbies and interests...

:)

A:

This can be a problem due to applicant tracking systems (ATS) but there are ways around it. In your summary, you should make it clear that you are looking to relocate. Also make a point of mentioning your desire to relocate in any cover letters.


Q:

Bobby, what was the meanest thing Patrice ever said to you?

A:

What modulates brain plasticity?


Q:

Could we please make a monument in your honor, Matt Groening?

A:

A lot of your hardcore fans will point new listeners towards a mixtape or a live show instead of a Bassnectar album.

Do you think the music that is put out on albums is a good representation of what Bassnectar is or is only a piece of the puzzle?


Q:

Hello my name is Jose Palacios I am a Labor Consultant based out Los Angeles, Ca. I been self employed for over two years now. I notice that I am able to receive more phone calls from cold calling whenever I use the name Joe Palace. What would suggest for brownies like my self in order to stand out and not be stereotyped?

A:

He said so many mean things. He's called me a fat lesbian, I dunno there's too many mean things to come up with


Q:

The modulation or control of brain plasticity is a subject of thousands of scientific reports. There is a control system deep in the brain that releases chemical modulators – we call them modulatory neurotransmitters. Included on this list are the transmitters norepinephrine, acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, and endogenous opioids – along with two or three other minor players. Modulators are engaged as a function of behavioral context; you can think of them as having enabling power for plasticity. Or, they are released as a function of performance success – you could think of those as having “confirming power”. For example, norepinephrine broadly increases the excitability of responses across the cerebral cortex for those momentary times when it is released. When I am challenged to solve a problem, or challenged because something surprising has just occurred, its level of expression goes up. You could think of it as turning up the lights in the brain in ways that contribute to getting the answer right.

The neurotransmitter acetylcholine plays a different, crucial role. Acetylcholine is also released during moments of close attention – it actually increases the excitability of all of those things that are close to something I expect to occur, or something I am listening or searching for, or sensing to occur in my feelings. It actually allows the brain to change, to find a new solution, because the brain can actually engage the processes that can allow a substitution of what inputs dominate neural responses at each affected location. You can think of it as opening up the repertoire in the domain of possible change; once it is turned on, it gives you about two minutes to go through a behavioral cycle with the possibility of changing its effectively engaged neurons for the ones that were most valuable to improving behavioral performance.

Dopamine, another key neurotransmitter, is released as a function of the occurrence of a reward, or as the brain informs itself that it has responded correctly or made a correct judgment (a “self-recognized reward”), or by the expectation of a reward. That is to say, as soon as the brain expects you get the answer right, you get that rush of pleasure that tells you, “way to go!” – even before you respond to indicate that you know the right answer. Dopamine does two critical things: it modulates enduring change. Dopamine release does another wonderful thing; dopamine related processes actually change rapidly from having an initial positive plastic effect to having an immediately following negative plastic effect. What it is doing is strengthening all of those activities that contributed to performance success, then it takes the next moment in time to weaken everything connectionally that did not contribute. So, there is a positive and negative effect, which taken together, amplifies the power of change.

Serotonin and endogenous opioids and other modulators are also in play, but explaining their specific roles would take another page, or two…or three. I recommend Wikipedia.

In the meantime, think about the marvels of owning a brain that controls its own evolution and change. What do these modulatory neurotransmitters do in sum? They turn on your plasticity machine when something important is about to happen (or has just happened). They open up the machinery for broad change, just for those learning moments when change can be important or valuable to you. They evaluate the success of your behavioral “try” – if it is a good one, they save all of those changes that contribute to its success, and by doing that progressively and iteratively, they give you the power of master controller for even very complex activities. All of this occurs with the brain operating on the basis of enabling change that it interprets to be in its own best interest. What a machine you possess. What a wondrous thing. I sure hope you have a healthy one. I sure hope you are taking good care of your very own most powerful organ.

A:

Too late, I'm sculpting my own. - Matt G


Q:

as long as its not setlists or clips on youtube im fine ;)

i would say come to Freestyle Sessions or Bass Center if you are really curious, because those events are created from scratch, and we are all obsessing over every tint detail, living and breathing EVERY detail with so much love and imagination

if you find yourself on a forum with bozos debating a setlist, that sounds like the most boring life ever, so keep them away from that nonsense :)

A:

Hi Jose, good question. This is a hot topic of debate within the recruiter community currently and hiring managers are definitely becoming more aware of their biases. There have been a number of studies proving that yes, discrimination does exist; here's a recent one:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/hbsworkingknowledge/2017/05/17/minorities-who-whiten-resumes-get-more-job-interviews/#49ba55c57b74

In general, we don't recommend changing the last name on resumes as it creates problems during the hiring process. However, if you are comfortable going by Joe at the workplace, that is completely acceptable to use on your resume. We often utilize this practice for Asian legal names when the candidate goes by an American name.

More in-depth studies show that aligning your skills and interests to the norm is beneficial -- I hate that stereotyping is a large part of hiring and we wouldn't suggest "whitewashing," but try to align your profile to your industry.


Q:

Who is the next BIG comedian to die, and why is it Artie Lange?

A:

How important is the 21 day rule? Does it significantly affect the learning process? Can you stop and then retake again after a while, or will the effectiveness be seriously reduce? Thank you for such a great work through the years.


Q:

Which would win in a fight, Luck of the Fryrish or Jurassic Bark?

A:

if you were to go back in time to experience one historical event what would it be and why?


Q:

What kind of advice can you offer this up and coming generation (millennials) that are trying to break into this job market for the first time?

A:

I love Artie I would never say that to him. Keep all the mean shit to me you piece of gaaaarbage


Q:

The 21 day rule is a kind of myth. The notion is that if you do anything 21 days in a row, you have developed an ingrained habit that will be with you for the duration of your life. Not true, of course. Whether you return to repeat some behavior or not is very much a function of the power it carries for rewarding you for that behavioral cycle. Sometimes, embedding a bad or good habit can be rapid. Sometimes, it is never acquired with any real reliability, because enduring change is so powerfully modulated as a function of behavioral context and the reward systems of the brain.

So, if I do something 21 or 2100 days in a row, that doesn’t matter very much to me as it requires no particular skill or practice. Nothing changes in the brain because it doesn’t have to to perform the skill. On the other hand, if I make it harder – just enough harder – so that it commands my full attention, and/or if I reward myself by giving myself $5 every time I get it right, I can embed what I have learned and change my brain in an enduring way for an awfully long time through a very short period of practice. Put another way, how many people of my age can remember where they were and what they were doing at the time they heard that President Kennedy was assassinated? From that single event so emotionally powerful for almost every American citizen. Our brains pumped chemicals, in such a powerful form, that it is embedded in our memory forever. My episodic recollection of hearing the news is almost vivid now as it was 56 years ago when it occurred. On the other hand, a billion things have occurred in my life from that time to now that go virtually unrecorded, because no chemical was released, or because the release was so puny as to sustain a permanent record.

A:

Jurassic Bark. In the third round. - BW


Q:

i love history! i am fascinated by it!!!! read A People's History of The United States by Howard Zinn watch "Untold History" with Oliver Stone on Netflix

pay attention because so much has gone down and then been forgotten about and HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF :)

as for being a time traveller, i would rather just be deeply awake and grateful in the moment :)

A:

Stay open minded, there are many opportunities out there that could seem like they are unrelated to what you want in a career, but could lead to incredible options later down the road. Be prepared to work hard and show that you are interested in staying in the position for awhile - because, with the current job-hopping trend, many employers are hesitant to hire millennials if they are suspicious that they will leave within a year or two of employment. Reach out to your network, this is one of the most valuable tools you have as a young job-seeker looking to break into an industry. Focus on how you can make a big impact at your first employer right away - the more you can achieve in a short time, the better for making moves either up the ladder or into different, better positions.


Q:

Hi Bobby, #Big fan! Was it troubling staying still on the flat bed when Jesse, Randolph and Rae were helping you escape from the park?

A:

I know someone who suddenly started forgetting common words (for ex: remote, bell pepper). What changes in plasticity occur in such a huge sudden change?


Q:

is there any joke you guys put into the show that you were really happy/proud of that maybe wasn't noticed by viewers? or got the reaction you wanted?

A:

Lorin! HUGE FAN <3. 2 questions, what inspired freestyle sessions? And do you plan on having sessions in other locations?


Q:

Hello,

I'm a public health professional that just started a B school MBA program. I was tired of working 60 hours a week and getting poorly paid for 40. Do you have advice as two when I could/should start marketing myself to other fields? I am surrounded by pharma companies so those are the low hanging fruit. Are they other avenues I should also be looking at?

A:

I really wanna laugh at that reference but I don't know what the fuck you're talking about. #gofuckyourmother #loveyou


Q:

Anyone that experiences changes like this that seem to arise over a narrow window of time should go to the doctor and have it checked out. All kinds of things can happen in a brain that can cause a rapid change in brain function and many of them require medical attention.

If the doctor finds that nothing is wrong then we can consider the kinds of factors that contribute to memory loss. For the most part we’ve been talking to memory loss that has occurred as a long, slow negatively-plastic progression. Rapid loss, something that has decisively changed over the last month or year may have another agency. For the long-term loses, the usual cause is a slow deterioration in the way the brain represents what you’re seeing, hearing, or feeling, and the sharpness with which the brain represents that information. High back-ground noise in the processes of the brain may also be a negative factor contributing to a progressively-failing memory.

Whatever the cause is, deterioration in memory can usually be driven in a substantially positive direction by intensive training. At the same time, any rapid change should be interpreted as a clear signal to you to go see your doctor.

A:

We were stuck writing the scene in which the head of Henry Kissinger in a jar was negotiating with the Balls (in the episode "War Is the H Word"). It took two full days to come up with a single line for Kissinger -- two full days of nonstop unusable testicle jokes. We were going crazy, exasperated and fatigued with the all the balls puns that we were unable to stop making. Finally, someone wearily muttered, "This is not a productive area of discussion," and voila! Timeless comedy genius, plus we got to go home. Your friend, Matt


Q:

yah my dream would be to do these on turn tables or CD-Js [not in the cheaty-ass 'Just PRess Play and stand on a table relishing the glory of EDM' way] but like SUPER DEEP way...i started DJing on CDJs in 1997 or 1998 i believe.. Denons and Pioneer. i had been using vinyl before but i realized i could remic my own vrsions of vinyl, or play my own music by burning a CD and didnt need to wait for a vinyl press, etc.. at the time that was very revolutionary, as vinyl DJs were confined to only what had been pressed to wax. so i was goin NUTSO in the alte nineties playing insnaely creative sets with tons of exclusive mashups and versions, and multiple times had some yahoo troll wingnut trying to yell at me that i should GTFO unless i played vinyl... anyhow...

so yah, eventually i would like to play these all with 4 or 5 turntables and do them in various cities in small rooms with no lights or anything, just bump crazy music in the dark :)

for this first one, i've just been focusing on the music nonstop: i have spent every week since february remixing old tunes, remastering my record collection, recording vinyl into the computer, recreating the drums and bassline, adding tons of effects and layers, or sampling the FVCK out of old classics... then just nonstop editing and re-cutting and customizing... every style, genre, tempo...

most of this music is deep and complex but not exactly what i would play at mainstage Bonaroo or in the peak moments of Electric Forest or whatever... its deeper

its what would i play if it was just you and me on a road trip, or if it was just us and a dozen friends drinking wine in a tree house, or if it was just us a 5 dozen friends going APESHIT at a house party and swinging from the curtains, ... just playing anything and everything under the sun, and focusing on the fun...

its not that i dont have fun usually, i definitely do! but the full on bassnectar sets like at bass center, that stuff is SO high octane and so over the top and immersive and overwhelming...its like drowning in lava or having massive tsunami waves crash down on your brain

freestyle is more like playing hide and seek in the dark with your best friends at summer camp, under a full moon, on Jupiter, with a few alien buddies joining along, while sipping mango juice, and then realiziing you are an alien and you were born on Jupiter, and all the kids you're playing hide and seek with are aliens from earth, so you are not actually an alien, you are a JUPITERIAN!!!!!

:)

A:

Hi dopo, it's never too early to start the recruitment process in business school! We see candidates pounding the pavement as early as the first Aug/Sep of a 2 year program.

One thing we do consistently see -- the location of the business school is very correlated with the success of its students in landing a job. Take advantage of the network the school offers you first, as there are many relationships between the school and companies that may not be obvious to the student body. Good luck!


Q:

You're a delightfully lovable creep, Bobby. What was the meanest thing you said about Vos at the roast the other night?

A:

Importantly, the same scientific studies have clearly shown that these negative progressions are NOT inevitable. We have the power to throw the plasticity switch from ‘decline’ to ‘grow.’

If that's true, why haven't we seen dramatic benefits from cognitive training approaches in neurodegenerative disease patients? All I'm aware of are some studies like ACTIVE showing that it can reduce the risk somewhat. But if a loss of plasticity was the core dysfunction of a disease like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, wouldn't you expect enhancing plasticity to have strong disease-modifying effects? Are there other factors like amyloid neurotoxicity that limit how much benefit you can get from cognitive training after a person is showing symptoms of disease?


Q:

Any chance we'll see more Futurama episodes or movies in the future? Please please please say yes!

A:

In places like tech startups, would you consider directly emailing the CEO with your resume as a smart move or not?


Q:

Bonnie was dating Nathan Fillion from Castle and Firefly, and she dumped him and ended up marrying Vos. I put up a photo on the big screen of Fillion and read his credits. Firefly, Guardians of the Galaxy and a network ABC show with 170 episodes, 100,000 an episode

Then I read Vos' that started with Maxwell's and Poughkeepsie - what a bad choice she made

A:

In the train wreck of AD, the brain is full of pathology. Big areas of the brain are substantially disconnected and offline. The brain is progressively shrinking in volume with dramatic neuropil in these regions. You can think of the amyloid bodies as equivalent to grenades that have blown up in the regions of the brain that they occupy because neurons around them die and connectivity in their neighborhood is reduced or destroyed. Obviously the earlier we attempt to intervene in this process, the greater our prospects for sustaining functionality and driving the brain in a corrective direction. 5 years before disease onset would obviously be a stronger therapeutic position than time of onset. 10 years before, better still. 30 years before, lots better still.

At the same time, in the Religious Order study and in a study conducted at Rush Memorial in Chicago, large populations of aging individuals were tracked as they progressed from normal old age to MCI to AD. Between the two studies, the brains of several thousand individuals who lived to the end of life with or without AD were studied in great detail. These studies show that there’s a surprisingly weak basis of explanation for the neurological deficits that degrade the lives of older people and the expressed neuropathology that we associate with AD. In the carefully conducted Rush Memorial studies, for example, it was estimated that 42% of the variance in performance can be accounted for by the expression of AD-related or other pathological markers. Put another way, some very impaired individuals have remarkably little evident pathology expressed by these markers. Other individuals have brains with lots of tangles and plaques but, despite this, are doing remarkably well. These studies suggest that a bigger factor than all of that pathology is that “it” factor I’ve earlier described as cognitive reserve.

These studies also strongly suggest that if we just knew what to do, if we had more powerful ways of engagement, then maybe we could drive people with lots of pathology expressed in their brain in a more strongly restorative direction. There’s clearly a lot of work to be done to sort out how this might be achieved in this very impaired human population.


Q:

There are no new TV episodes or movies in the pipeline at the moment... HOWEVER, here and now I promise a different avenue of exciting Futurama news later this summer, no kidding. Keep your expectations modest and you will be pleased, possibly. I am not allowed to say more or I will be lightly phasered. - David X. Cohen

A:

Yes, but make sure you do your homework about the story of the company and why you'd love it. Target the right person (CEO, CTO, COO) who would be the decision-maker for your role. Following up once or twice on the email is perfectly fine too. Don't be discouraged if they don't respond to your first or second try.


Q:

Hi Bawby, thanks for giving Chip Chipperson a spot on The Riotcast Network. He's a national treasure. What happened with Sex, Drugs, & Rock and Roll?

A:

Hi Mike! I use BrainHQ myself and read some article that Tom Brady does too. What's he like?


Q:

Billy: What was your favourite voice to do on the show?

A:

Any advice on doing a Skype interview from across the world?


Q:

You're welcome. It kills me to say you're welcome. He's the #1 show on Riotcast. Sex, Drugs & Rock and Roll got cancelled, that's why I'm doing this

A:

That’s a good question. Tom Brady is a remarkable human being. When I went home from meeting him at one point my wife, Diane, told me she thought I had a man crush. I’m in the office of his training center in Foxboro and he’s a little late to come to the meeting. He comes in, all strapping 6’4” of him and says he’s a little winded because he finishes his 3 hour exercise program every morning by completing 10 table jumps. I ask “Tom, what is a table jump?” He replies “I stand next to a table and jump onto it and jump back onto the ground again.” I ask, “Tom, how high is the table?” “It’s just like your dining room table”, says Tom. I look up at him and say to myself Holy Sh**. Needless to say, he’s a rather remarkable physical specimen.

Tom used our programs initially in efforts to recover his full powers after all that head banging. And he quickly discovered that they improved his game play. He said he saw the field more completely and responded with greater accuracy and speed. It might be noted that over this period he actually accelerated the time it took to make a decision and release the ball with high accuracy. No one in football is faster or more accurate at decision making in the complex visual environment that he operates in than Mr. Brady. This is despite the fact that he is the oldest professional quarterback in harness still playing. Tom also told us about another surprising effect of his brain training. He said that for every game, Coach Belichick, gave him a list of the plays that would be called against that week’s opponent. More than 100 plays required that he remember and repeat 8 two-syllable word sequences that differed for each play. He said that in almost every game before brain training he made mistakes in delivering those instructions verbally to his teammates. He’d go over to the sideline and Coach Belichick would yell at him because he screwed up the play. He said that with brain training, that occurred lots less often.

Tom is one of a number of highest-level athletes that have used BrainHQ both to help them restore and sustain their brain health and help them improve their highest level performance abilities. It’s surprising in a way that it has taken so long for professional athletes to realize that a critical way they can improve their play, to bring it to even a higher level, is to improve the operational powers of the machine that controls all their actions that they carry around inside their head.

It’s wrong to think of brain training as being limited to help people who struggle. Brain plasticity provides a basis for any individual to be better at any ability that is really important to them, on the job, in their hobbies, or in the management of their lives.


Q:

I can't say honestly, I loved everything I was given the opportunity to interpret - BW

A:

Make sure you go to a quiet place, have a good wi-fi connection and show up for the interview as if it was a live, in-person interview. Dress professionally, make sure your hair isn't a mess and have a bright attitude. It can be strange to have an interview through the computer but make it as natural as possible by treating it as if it were an in-person interview. Let your personality shine through and remember that they can still see your body language and get an idea of who you are through cyberspace.


Q:

I'm sure you've gained a lot of new fans here. My question is, is the festival exclusively for laughs, or is that just a marketing ploy?

A:

Hi Michael, what's your take on consciousness? Do you think that just chemistry and brain matter = life?


Q:

Not sure if you were aware of its existence, but there's an entire subreddit of people who fall asleep to Futurama. I can't tell you how many times I've had a shitty or stressful day and put on an episode to help me go to sleep and try to make the next one better. Thank you so much for creating something that, when I didn't have any friends, made me feel like maybe I did.

Question: One $300 hookerbot or 300 $1 hookerbots?

A:

software portfolio is what my husband calls it, same as an artist might have, a sample of your own work.


Q:

That was too intelligent of a joke for me, dumb it down stupid

A:

Beginning about 30 years ago, scientists began describing activities that they argue correlate with conscious awareness. When they’re there, you’re aware. When they’re not, you’re not. Still, no one has clearly explained the basis of this spark except in these correlative phenomenological ways. What IS that little moment of awareness, exactly? They don’t know and neither do I. I await a clear explanation from science.

We do know that the conscious self almost certainly arises in the brain as a product of brain plasticity. For every sensation, for every perception, for every action, the brain is associating those sensations, perceptions, and actions to the other things that belong with them in the context of the world. The brain is plastically growing those associations as a basis for creating the model of the world that you have constructed. For every sensation, perception, or action, the brain is also making a second association and that’s an association to their source. Their source is you, YOURSELF. You are a product of a massive schedule of self-association that establishes you as a principle actor on the stage.

Scientists have shown that you actually have multiple self-identities. Millions of inputs from the surface of your body results in the creation of an embodied self, that you identify as bounded by the limits of your skin. If you think about you as an observer of the world and you said “what are you?” You would locate yourself immediately behind your eyes because self-references are associated with all of those millions of moments in which you have drunken information about that world in front of your eyes. In the same way, cognitive psychologists have argued that you have created maybe 4, or 5, or 6 of these self-referenced entities. What a wonderful thing this is. In our life time we create, through brain plasticity processes, not only the operational person but also a strong, resilient central actor that is orchestrating so beautifully our intentional use of this most remarkable of machines.


Q:

It depends on if you have 3 bills or 300 bills. Act accordingly. - John

A:

Great answer!

To echo what face said -- we're based in SF and as a technology company, half of us are software engineers. If you want to be a developer, you definitely need to have project work to display. Some people learning to code commit to it and have a lot of material to show, while others are only dabbling. Even bootcamps can generate very uneven candidates and aren't seen as "enough" now since they've become so prolific. If you're starting out, there's no reason not to publicize your github.

That being said, web design, data analysis, and PM are all VERY different jobs. Encourage your friend to speak to some more people in the tech industry to see which would suit her strengths.


Q:

Hi Bobby. I'm a huge fan and respect you as a human being. My wife is terminally sick and my family is having a really hard time coping. Do you have any words of encouragement?

A:

Hi Dr. Merzenich, do you have any experience with hemifacial spasm?


Q:

You don't like asking hookers to make change?

A:

How have you helped fresh grads overcome the barrier of entering the job market which demand XX number years of experience in the field when they have little to none?


Q:

I hope your fat wife dies. No I'm sorry, scratch that, I hope your whole family dies

A:

Since the predominant hypothesis of origin seems to lie in the facial nerve (a nerve enervating the muscle of the face and not the brain) there is relatively little that I could say about it except that any widespread engagement of those muscles will result in a very powerful feedback from sensory receptors from muscles, skin and other tissues in the face to the brainstem (which could contribute to generating an enduring problem). I’m uncertain as to whether or not there might be a brain plasticity-related strategy to impact it but it’s not impossible to think there might be.

If I were you I would have someone stimulate the surface of my face (as I was blindfolded) and see if I could accurately reconstruct the locations of felt stimuli on the effected as well on the unaffected side. If you can’t, have that person help you with a 20-minute daily training session and see if you can improve your sensory feedback from the face. It’s possible that any weakening from that highly correlated activity fed back to the brain from skin and muscles could be on a path to at least limited improvement and generation of these strong co-contracting events. Of course you might also find that such an exercise is valueless. In which case, sorry for bringing it up.


Q:

I don't like getting hit with rolls of quarters. - John

A:

A little bit of insight on how recruiters at companies think:

Typically jobs available for will be broken into a variation on three categories: Entry (students), Experienced Hires, and Executives.

If you're a fresh grad, you are looking for entry-level positions where ideally the work experience range is 0-3 years. There is some leeway around applying to roles that are 3-5 years of experience required if you have reputable internship experience, AND the years of experience are typically not a hard-and-fast rule for human reviewers, but we encourage you not to waste your time applying to the wrong job.

Talent acquisition staff will look for a few core things in a recent graduate's resume: skillset (education or self-learned), leadership experience, and related industry experience (extracurriculars or interests). Best of luck!


Q:

Do you actually do bang bangs in real life and if so what is your favorite cuisine pairing?

A:

I have a family history of alzheimers, parkinsons and neurological cancers on both sides of my family, as well as a familial propensity for long life. I also have a couple of questions:

  1. I'm 25 now, and I don't hesitate to say that being diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the future is my greatest fear. I'd like to know if there's anything I should be doing in order to help lower my risk of it?

  2. What do you think of the fact that the number of cases of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurological diseases has been increasing as life expectancy rises? Is there any sort of correlation and do you believe that if you live long enough, you'll eventually begin suffering from some neurological disease?


Q:

Hey Futurama team!

I love the show and have watched all of the seasons several times, and one of my favorite things about the series is the plethora of interesting and funny side characters. Whether they show up several times, such as Nixon’s head, or only for one episode, such as the Monks of Dschubba, the side characters help to make the show what it is.

My question is, what is everyone’s favorite side character from Futurama?

My personal favorite is the greeting card from the “Mother’s Day” episode.

Oh, and for Mr. Groening: can you tell us anything about your new show coming to Netflix?

Thanks for doing the AMA, and have a good day!

A:

Any tips for a 30 something currently finishing an undergraduate in engineering to land internships?


Q:

Yes unfortunately I have, it would have to be dinner then chinese

A:

Over the past 2 days, I’ve answered your questions in several different ways (e.g., see response to /u/venomeater69). You should begin the process of managing your brain health in this epoch of your life. Don’t wait. Evaluate yourself on a regular basis. I’ve discussed earlier how you might accomplish that – for example by assessing your brain speed at different levels of operations. Given your inherited risk, simply take the strategies I’ve described for living your life to the advantage of your brain, and if necessary, for engaging your brain in computer directed exercises more seriously. For example, on BrainHQ, if your performance is always sustained on a level of a relatively highly effective person operating in the third or fourth decade of life and that performance is sustained decade-by-decade as you grow older, you should be (at least hypothetically) in a relatively strong position going forward. Just keep yourself there.

Of course life and our science does not yet come with hard and fast guarantees. We all live with uncertainties but in the meantime because you have been working actively to grow your brain health and keep yourself in neurologically good shape, you are making the most out of life. You’re are doing the best for your brain to make it the most useful for you.

Put it another way, grow your brain power effectively across your life and that will carry 2 consequences: your life will be stronger and better and you will be sustaining the organic health of your brain just as well as your genetics will allow.


Q:

That Greeting Card voice is amazing. And I see now it is mis-attributed on some internet pages. The actress who actually did that part is Nicole St. John! She also appeared several more times doing the heart-breaking voice of Sally, the orphan girl with the ear on her forehead. (Some internet sites mistakenly credit the card voice as Tara Strong... great actress who played Bender's tap-dancing rival Tonya in Futurama ep 7ACV25!) - David X. Cohen

A:

Network with your professors. This is one of the best ways for older undergraduate students to land jobs, especially in engineering/hard sciences. Because you are likely far more mature than some of your younger undergraduate counterparts, you can connect with professors or other campus faculties who may have connections either within your university for internships or work experience, or they may have external connections in companies that could help you out. They are your best resource to get started.


Q:

what do you think it will take to leave your child without a father?

A:

What are you thoughts on tinnitus and brain plasticity?


Q:

Thanks for doing this AMA, meatbags!

Matt: If you could go back in time and make any changes to Futurama's characters/plot lines, what would you do and why?

David: Were there any challenges that plagued the writers in the writing room? What were they and how were they resolved?

Billy and John: What's the strangest vocal direction that you've received in the booth? (Not necessarily during the production of Futurama)

A:

I'm turning 30 soon and despite having a degreee in Hospitality management I've never been above minimum wage. Am I already doomed to fail?


Q:

Lie - eggs whites with orange slices

Truth - two eggs sandwiches and a cuban cigar

A:

Most people don’t realize that 1 in 10 of their fellow citizens has to live with chronic tinnitus and that for several million Americans tinnitus is a source of almost-continuous distress. Most people don’t realize that something as seemingly innocuous as ringing of your ears can destroy a life, degrade performance on the job, disrupt sleep, drive emotional and psychiatric changes, and accelerate a progression to dementia. Most people don’t realize that a large proportion of individuals who serve in the military or who are working life as police officers, are at especially high risk for tinnitus onset.

Trials have been conducted by an independent scientist, Jay Picarillo, from Wash U using our listening training programs. About half of the trained people have better control over their tinnitus and those individuals expressed strong gratitude for having established that control even while the magnitude of the tinnitus was unaffected. Because they can put it out of mind at will, they can live and sleep with it and this is a great relief to them. Although almost all say they would do it again, there is a subclass that showed little or no benefit from this intensive training. We are now revising our training strategies because we think we should be able to impact it more powerfully and help more people escape from the clutches of tinnitus.

I’m also excited by studies being led by a former fellow of mine (Michael Kilgard at UT-Dallas) who has been amplifying learning strategies to try and drive stronger and faster brain-plasticity based changes in tinnitus suffers. Maybe he’ll come up with the true answer. In any event he and we know that this population represents a very important target for brain-plasticity based therapeutics. If there is nothing else for you to do with your present tinnitus, do what Dr. Picarillo did in his outcome trial. Do 40 hours of training on the Auditory Intensive training suite. There’s about a 50/50 chance that it will make a big difference in improving your control of the ringing or noises. These scientists showed that even individuals that did not have significant benefits in establishing better control of their tinnitus had at least modest improvement in brain connectivity which were in a normalizing (albeit, still far from perfect) direction.

Here are the details of the paper: https://www.zotero.org/groups/301482/cognitive_training_data/items/itemKey/JDSF5FG2/tag/Tinnitus


Q:

"Do it louder, but make sure it's still soft." - John

A:

Of course not! Search for the list of successful businessmen & women who were successful later in life -- you'll be surprised to find that is the norm, and success before 30 is the outlier.


Q:

Why do you pretend female comedians are funny?

A:

For Billy: what do you think Fry's best attribute is?


Q:

Bonnie MacFarlene is one of the funniest comedians I know. Idiot. Yamaneika, who happens to be on the Nasty Show from the 19-29 - for tickets go to hahaha.com is hilarious, crazy funny. Michelle Woolf is good. And Judy Gold is good

A:

His ability to become the central character of a cartoon show called Futurama. - BW


Q:

Were you drawing from personal experience with your scene in Sirens? It all seemed so real

A:

Why does Ross the largest Friend not simply eat the other five?


Q:

Oh when I had the coke bottle stuck in my ass. No I've never used a coke bottle

A:

He did... obviously you missed the series finale. - David X. Cohen


Q:

Why do you love food more than your child?

A:

Why is there a magician in Atlanta?


Q:

Stop with the fucking, stop getting real, don't make statements. Either be funny or fuck yourself

A:

Search for the lyrics for The Donovan Song, "Atlantis" - John & writers


Q:

Will you dress up as Victor, the Just for Laughs mascot?

A:

How do you feel about socks and sandals?


Q:

I think I already am. I look very similar right now. Just paint me green and take my clothes off

A:

Some people will eat anything - BW


Q:

Is there any particular episode that you're especially attached to?

A:

As a true cartoon fan, the episode, "Jurassic Bark" blew me away. I never thought a cartoon would have the resonance to evoke such a feeling of sadness. I was really sad. And, then I got mad at myself for my eyes misting up. - BW


Q:

Is there any particular episode that you're especially attached to?

A:

I love all the anthology of interest episodes: Luck of the Fryrish, Jurassic Bark, and Roswell that ends well

  • John

Q:

What is your favorite flavor of ice cream?

A:

Salted caramel. Bender's favorite flavor would be rust. - John


Q:

How fleshed out were the characters initially and how much of their "growth" happened naturally as the series progressed?

A:

In the first season everything is kind of a work in progress, and ideas and voices morph over time. In other words, it becomes what it was supposed to be. - BW


Q:

For Billy:

Did you have to rest more than the other actors because you voiced so many characters on the show? Was there any character in particular that strained your voice more than the others?

If you have time for one more: Did it hurt to voice Jackie Puppet?

I'm a big fan of your work!

A:

Thanks for being a fan! I'm not done yet so stay tuned. I'm a freak and I was basically designed to do that stuff- plus it's very cathartic to scream and yell in multiple voices. - BW


Q:

My toddler found Futurama on Netflix, on her own, and loves it. I'm very proud of her, and it's nice to have something I can stand to watch with her. Just thought you should know, there's a brand new generation growing up on Futurama. Has anyone else told you about their kids watching Futurama?

A:

You are a bad parent, and now the authorities know. Expect child services to be knocking on your door sometime soon. HUGS! - John


Q:

We're finally starting to see some manifestation of smart robots in the home (Roomba, Kuri, even Amazon Echo). What does Bender think of these robots, and the others that will eventually be his ancestors?

A:

Yea, I tapped them. - Bender


Q:

In episode 2F09, when Itchy plays Scratchy's skeleton like a xylophone, he strikes the same rib in succession, yet he produces two clearly different tones. I mean, what are we to believe, that this is a magic xylophone, or something? Ha ha, boy, I really hope somebody got fired for that blunder

A:

As the writer of that episode I feel uniquely qualified to answer this. I'm afraid the person who got fired was me. For that error and a number of other, slightly less serious blunders, I was fired off the Itchy & Scratchy writing staff and had to go work on Futurama as a fallback. - David X. Cohen


Q:

For John:

Bender is my favorite cartoon character of all time and I quote him daily! What was your favorite episode voicing Bender?

For Billy:

What was your favorite moment from playing Nixon's head in a jar? Also I grew up hearing your voice as Doug and Stimpy, so thank you for being a part of me growing up!

A:

When Nixon proclaimed 'the great taste of Charleston Chew' - BW


Q:

Weirdest request ever: Sir Billy West, how much would you charge to call me on my birthday and say something to me in the Farnsworth voice? I could die a happy man after that, and it's been on my bucket list for awhile.

I'm totally serious, I would pay a dear price for such a favor.

A:

Send me a bitcoin or I'll hold the voice for ransom. (Nixon voice) Rrrransomware - BW


Q:

Have you ever thought about a series dedicated to the life of scruffy?

A:

Dialogue would be a series of grunts and moans. And uh-huhs. >John


Q:

What the real percentage of metals that Bender is made out of?

You guys are amazing!

A:

The formula is quite simple... for all metals X, 40% X. - David X. Cohen


Q:

Jurassic Bark. What the fuck man?

A:

Tell me bout it >John


Q:

First off, I cannot thank you guys and the entire cast and crew of Futurama for creating such a personally influential piece of (dare I say it?) art.

David: How has your academic career influenced your writing? Was a career in writing something you pursued during grad school or did it 'just happen'?

Billy & John: Your ability to just slip into your characters is nothing short of magic, but I've always been curious to know what you do to warm-up before VO sessions.

Matt: I'll be moving to LA in a few weeks. In the incredibly rare possibility that I see you in public, what should I absolutely, positively, not do if we meet?

A:

Just don't ask for a bite of my taco. Burrito, yes. Taco, no. Regards, Matt


Q:

First off, I cannot thank you guys and the entire cast and crew of Futurama for creating such a personally influential piece of (dare I say it?) art.

David: How has your academic career influenced your writing? Was a career in writing something you pursued during grad school or did it 'just happen'?

Billy & John: Your ability to just slip into your characters is nothing short of magic, but I've always been curious to know what you do to warm-up before VO sessions.

Matt: I'll be moving to LA in a few weeks. In the incredibly rare possibility that I see you in public, what should I absolutely, positively, not do if we meet?

A:

Old Crow. The secret to my success. >John


Q:

This question is for Billy and John,

What advice do you have for an aspiring voice actor? Is being located in Los Angeles a necessity or is there a better way to be recognized?

A:

Well where the hell do you live? LOL

Being located in Los Angeles helps, or New York, or Chicago. But for the most part, the best way to be recognized is with your pants on. - John


Q:

My favorite episode is Roswell that ends well. What are your favorite episodes?!?!!?

A:

One of my faves. "Fry, you ever get the feeling you like girls cuz you're supposed to?" - John


Q:

Any Futurama fan knows there are some episodes that just sucker punch you right in the feels. As the writers/cast/crew, are there any episodes that were particularly emotional for you to create? If so, which and why?

P.S. thank you for giving me a show to feel at home with all my adult life. Futurama is love, is life.

A:

The last one. It killed me. >John