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HealthI am a 33 year old woman who just had brain surgery. I'm only 6 days post op. I had an acoustic neuroma removed, which is a benign tumour of the nerves of the inner ear, but this expanded and was pushing my brain out the way. AMA.

Aug 21st 2017 by boldasloves • 9 Questions • 41 Points

My 5 Questions:

  1. What do things look like now?
  2. How long did you look at it?
  3. Do your eyes look different now?
  4. Did it hurt?
  5. Do you regret doing it?

Public Contact Information: If Applicable

Q:

Did you eat the tumor?

A:

Who was the person that had the biggest impact on you while you were inside?


Q:

How did you guys live and support yourselves financially during the development process? Before you released on early access?

A:

Oh god, I just searched up a photo of slag. Absolutely horrifying. My question is, would there have been any way to save the workers, even if say a medical team were there? In the article it states that it was a pool of the lava-like substance 6 inches deep and 40 feet wide, seems like it'd be almost impossible to somehow grab the workers out? Plus if it's lava like then it's also extremely viscous, would it make it even more difficult to pull the workers out?


Q:

I work at an eye doctor. Not 30 minutes after the eclipse, a guy called saying he accidentally looked at the sun because he forgot it was happening and wanted to know what could happen to his eyes.

A:

I donated it to science. But curiosity did make me ask what type of texture it would be. Closest doctor could come up with was a grape.

Do people eat tumours? Is that a thing?


Q:

That would have to be Carl King, my best friend. He was a fanatic, and that's how his family labeled him. He was always fighting for me.

A:

Gustaw - We gathered funds during a Indiegogo campaign. Before that, we were working after hours, with no funding at all, working day jobs / freelancing.


Q:

Records show the responding medical team did fight hard despite the impossible situation. Two died on the scene, but the three that died later were pulled out, wrapped with burn blankets, and taken to the hospital.

A:

Do you expect to get a lot of calls/visits tomorrow regarding people who looked at the eclipse naked?


Q:

i saw the ENT for ear pain and ringing (took months to see someone which drove me crazy!) and do have asymmetrical hearing loss which got me the MRI. At the appointment I was told it was probably just from TMJ and I needed to see a dentist. When the MRI results came back, At first the report said no tumors found, just mildly swollen lymph node.

A week later I get a call from doctor saying she and another doctor had reviewed the scans and guess what (?!) something did light up and it wasn't on the report. All I heard was a few things, "maybe tumor" and freaked out, brain shut down. I also had a 14 month year old and I just thought of dying and leaving her.

I still feel like I'm in th dark with some details, have never seen the scans. I've been trying to get the MRI scans to have someone else look at them because of their original mistake.

A:

Did you confide in other inmates? Did they believe you were innocent?


Q:

There's a lot of trippy shit in this game. Any real life experiences / dreams that became an inspiration for darkwood?

A:

I haven't worked in this industry but I have worked around lots large equipment and sites where safety is a major concern. I am baffled by what happened here. This seems like such a blatantly dangerous undertaking I'm amazed it happened once let alone "hundreds of times".

If you're working near a crane with a properly secured load, you still never stand or work near that suspended load, no matter how well secured or light it may be. How did anyone think that working under thousands of gallons of liquid slag was reasonable? Oh, and the only thing holding it up was a mass of solidified slag?

Forget the safety guidelines, where was the common sense?


Q:

Unfortunately, yes. For a week and a half people were calling asking about eclipse glasses. Now, I can't wait to get a million calls about damaged eyes.

A:

Definitely push for a second opinion, don't take no for an answer. The good news is, if it isn't clear on the scans it's probably not too big. And ANs are notoriously slow growing.

I have an 18 month old, so I know the fear.

But please please please keep pushing and find out what it actually is.


Q:

Yeah, my story didn't changed. What else I could say? I was never going to admit to the crime, and in my mind, if I was telling my story, it hopefully would reach the ear of someone who would be able to help me.

A:

Gustaw - both me and Artur suffer from having hallucinations when waking up during the night. I used to even have sleep paralysis, but not anymore. Sometimes I see some really trippy stuff. Today I woke up and stared at a poster on the wall for like a minute, which changed from a hole in the wall to it's original form (a face). I guess those were pretty easy to take inspiration from, at least from the perspective of emotions we wanted the player to feel.


Q:

A lot of people we interviewed asked the very same question.

A:

Please keep us posted on your busy day tomorrow.


Q:

Happy to hear you are recovering! Curious as to what your first thoughts/emotions were when you found out about the tumor?

A:

What was it like to be in prison knowing that you're innocent? What did you feel when you were trying to tell people you were innocent but they didnt believe you?


Q:

Ya'll called your company AcidWizard...sure it does not have anything to do with you guys taking copious amounts of LSD? I mean that logo sure seems like it.

A:

As a student of journalism myself, I'm impressed with the level of detail you put into the report! I found your diagrams very illuminating.


Q:

There's one in tifu about a guy that fucked his eyes up during an eclipse about 20 years ago. Think it was from this morning.

A:

The first thought was: "I knew it was something physical"!

The doctor had told me a tumour was so rare (which it was), that I hadn't allowed myself to get to scared before the results.

I even had the next lot of blood tests lined up ready for the result to be negative so we could keep searching for the answer.

I guess she'd said "benign" multiple times taking about the possibility of a tumour and when she called about the results, so a lot of me was thankful it wasn't the big-C. I didn't expect it to as big as it was though, that the next step would be brain surgery.

I guess context was the thing that kept me most sane here. Many people who get told Brain Tumour also get told Cancer and I Can't Operate. But it wasn't cancer, and they could operate, so I felt thankful for that.

Through the whole thing the biggest anxiety was the two week wait waiting to see the ear surgeon. I'd only been given a quick diagnosis over the phone, so waiting to actually hear how long until the op, what was going to happen, how long recovery time was, that was the most nerve wracking bit for me. Just so many unanswered questions.


Q:

Being in prison felt like hell. It felt like a strange land that I was forced to get accustomed to. What I realized early on was that I was fighting for my survival. From the day of my arrest to getting out, I was fighting for survival in prison on a daily basis and fighting for my freedom. My feelings were loneliness, frustration, a lot of anger, feeling like I was a nobody. Feeling like I had no one in the world that I could depend on. My main fear was that I would come out of prison and still be labeled a murderer.

A:

Gustaw - we're called Acid Wizard because we make stuff that will make you feel as if you've taken acid.


Q:

Thank you! Our editors pushed pretty hard for those diagrams. The technical aspects of this accident are pretty tough to understand (we had to talk to a lot of different people to get a clear understanding) and we wanted readers to not struggle while reading.

A:

Please bring it to me.


Q:

What are the advantages of choosing an acoustic neuroma over an electric one?

A:

What was your first meal when you got out?


Q:

Why were you forced to launch the game in early access in 2014?

A:

Is there any chance in hell somebody will be held personally responsible?


Q:

As a child I used to stare at the sun for long periods of time on purpose. I remember that there would be a bright light in the middle of my vision for a while afterwards but it would go away after a while. As an adult, I technically have 20/20 vision but I wear glasses with a mild prescription to help my eyes focus properly. The way that my eye doctor explained it to me is that while my eyes physically are the proper shape to have perfect vision, the muscles don't focus properly on their own. It has been like this ever since I could remember. Maybe it has something to do with my sun-staring sessions.

A:

Sound is way better with an acoustic. Plus you're not paying for all those electric parts, so it's really an investment in the craft of the tumour, y'know?


Q:

It was a vegetarian place. But I barely remember it because I was more fascinated by the fact that there was no cord on my wife's phone anymore.

A:

Kuba - We were running out of cash, to finalize project. Money from crowdfunding campain weren`t sufficient to make DARKWOOD happen.


Q:

Right now OSHA is investigating the accident and would decide who is responsible. If they find someone responsible, they could refer it for criminal prosecution. But the investigation will take some time since the accident was so severe, probably around 6 months.

A:

How come you're able to engage in recreational sun gazing without consequence while the rest of us can't?


Q:

Hey, I'm so glad that everything turned out okay. Hats off to you!

My question is, what kind of emotions are you feeling now that the surgery has gone successfully? And what're some plans you have now that you couldn't have done before?

A:

What was the biggest change in society/people that you found once you got out?


Q:

Which programming language did you use for developing this game? And/or did you build upon an existing engine?

Bought your game since day 1 - it was an awesome ride following you guys...

A:

“Mom, help me,” he begged, steam hissing in the background. “Mom, I’m burning.”

:(

Horrible event, great reporting and coverage. I especially liked the web friendly layout and the infographic. Who did the infographic? I'd like to know more about the production of such an effective bit of media...


Q:

Finally a post that is relevant to me!

oh.. I'm 12 hours late. this will get buried, but in good spirits, here are my answers:

  • 1 Things look normal now, only because I wear contacts to correct my vision and I had a surgery to prevent me from losing my vision.

  • 2 I looked at the sun for maybe 30-40 seconds, when I was a child. and it was 2 separate events with like 5 minutes in between each other.

  • 3 one of my eyes is shaped differently, but thats due to the eye surgery I had to save my vision.

  • 4 Yes it hurt, but not as bad as the 400 laser bursts I had to get in my eye hurt.

  • 5 I absolutely regret it, as a result I've had to have 2 eye surgeries. One used a sclerel buckle (basically a belt sewn around my eye) to prevent me from losing my vision, and a laser eye surgery to prevent my retinas from completely detaching from the inside of my eye (which would have caused blindness).

AMA anything about my eyes or eye surgeries

A:

Is still mostly just exhausted, wishing I could sleep more. Relief, I guess, that it was a success, I woke up, I'm not a vegetable.

I'm honestly just hoping to take it easy for the next few weeks and NOT achieve anything. Just let my body recuperate. So the plan is no plan.


Q:

What I found out and I probably didn’t realize before I went in, was how scared people were. Scared about everything. It threw me back because I never saw it in people before. On a small matter, the use of cell phones. I don’t remember people talking like that so I was asking my wife “Who are they talking to?” Even the geography of Crown Heights where I came from, it seemed like it was sunk in, not expanding and growing. The streets looked dark and bleak to me, so it was hard to try and reorganize things in my mind.

A:

Gustaw - we used Unity, and everything was written in C#. The main plugins we took advantage of are toolkit2d, A* Pathfinding, 2d volumetric lights, Rotorz tile system, Rewired. Previously we were developing in XNA and the jump to Unity was a tremendous quality of life improvement! Although some versions of Unity are very buggy, I would still heavily recommend this engine for small teams.


Q:

I did the infographic, mostly hand coded with the help of some javascript libraries. I explain a bit more on /r/webdev

https://www.reddit.com/r/webdev/comments/6vc8gv/how_do_you_do_a_diagram_animation_when_scrolling/

A:

This is indeed burried, but I read it (OP) and I love you.


Q:

Congrats on the successful surgery and hope you make a speedy recovery!

That being said did they keep you awake while the operated on your brain? If so what was that experience like? If not what's it like waking up from a surgery like that?

A:

Wow, thank you for doing this AMA. What would you say to the other people who are currently serving time for a crime they didn't commit?


Q:

Did you guys have any prior knowledge on Unity or the C# language before starting development on Darkwood?

A:

Those graphics were very helpful. Its a shame that basic LOTO procedures were not followed. Why were both contractors in the area at the same time?


Q:

Sure.

  1. I have a tiny, crescent shaped (white noise, TV static) spot at the center of my right eye. I can see perfectly with right eye but small details far away are just abstructed by that spot.

  2. It happened 20 years ago. Maybe 10 to 30 minutes.

  3. No. lol. Optometrist can actualy see the crescent that burned into my eye.

  4. No, it did not hurt.

  5. If I knew that I can permanently demage my eye, i wouldn't do it without proper eye protection. I can't say I regret it, I saw my firt eclipse.

Public contact info? PM. Depends what's for.

A:

Thanks.

No I didn't need to be awake. They did wake me up in the end (while still in surgery) and apparently I let out a big sigh of relief.

As far as I can recall being told I wasn't happy while in recovery, before I remembered why I was there. By the time I got to ICU I just wanted to sleep, and felt that way for a good 36 hours after too.


Q:

Try to find some type of network. You cannot do it all from prison, from behind the walls. We have to start to build, and in order to build, we have to change our thought process. A lot of prisoners know what people on the outside want and you give them that, but it's all lip service. Self-introspection is a must. If that's not taking place, you are not growing, and if you're not growing, you're more likely to make the same mistake.

A:

Gustaw - I had a little bit of experience in making web sites, flash and apps. But that's about it, I learned as we went ;)


Q:

Sounds like the two contractors were doing separate tasks. One actually specialized in water blasting and was trying to blast out the blockage at the bottom of the tank. The second was a clean up crew that would pull out/clear out smaller pieces of debris as they were broken up.

A:

Your mailing address is required in order to receive your first issue of Sex Weekly.


Q:

What's your favorite acoustic version of a song traditionally played with electric guitars?

A:

What's surprised you most about technology since you've been out?


Q:

How are the animations made? Frame by frame, pixel by pixel, or is it done another way and then pixelised to your style afterwards? Sort of like a filter over the animation to make it look pixely?

A:

/u/IAmAMods could you please flair these people up?


Q:

Jdhhd nsnjooe na dkocy naki nwkfih kakfu!

Shifhw nav ndkigw moo anud? Dboue giow laouw mpaug noci...vjje lapje ns ldie ppebf.

Kai!!

A:

Other way round the answer has to be "all along the watchtower". But maybe "Layla"?


Q:

The cell phone is a trial in itself for me, so anything after the cell phone I leave to my wife. What is amazing to me in my mind is that I see cell phones as a weapon. There's so many people with cell phones and I believe we are so conditioned that we only see this as a toy. Very few people maximize the use of it. But I believe we can change our habits and we may see things a little different.

A:

Kuba - Character animations were made frame by frame. I was working on bigger image, like 4x bigger than destined sprite. When we were exporting sprites we scaled sprite 4x smaller and then we were scaling it 200% so it was working like a filter pixelating graphic.


Q:

yes please, I think I already have some but /u/jcapriel and /u/KatMcGrory could use some

A:

Sorry for your loss. :(


Q:

Eh.

A:

How much time did you spend with the actor portraying you, Keith Stanfield? Are you happy with how he represents you on the big screen?


Q:

Is telling everyone that there's no jump scares really just a long-con setup to a major jump scare?

A:

Record everything. I keep a very detailed 'account book' that everything is written in. You have to do everything you can to keep yourself from being thrown under the bus; yes, do your job to the best of your abilities, but it's also on you to ensure that when something bad happens - and it will - that you have done everything you could/were permitted to do, and can prove it.


Q:

I glanced quickly maybe 3 or 4 times, once without any significant cloud coverage. My eyes kinda hurt and I really don't want to look at screens right now, but I have an office job.

A:

What's yours?


Q:

I spent about a week with Lakeith. He came to my house, came to see a movie with me. I like him a lot, because he's young, and he's doing what he loves. He found it early. For my role, you can't capture everything in a movie, but there's a lot that people can identify with. I want the movie to touch as many people as possible.

A:

Gustaw - unfortunately no, but we will use this idea for our next game which will be solely jump scare based.


Q:

Call a reporter.

A:

I don't like screens either, but I work at a window factory.


Q:

Do you still have faith in the justice system?

A:

I am also afraid to play horror games. Should I play Darkwood?


Q:

The revenue vs. profit comparison was rather intriguing. How much of the cost-cutting was attributed to corner-cutting of safety procedures?

A:

The potus can answer this


Q:

My feeling on the justice system is still shaken. I don't have faith in it. But what I do know, is that nothing stays the same forever. You may take little dents and little hits, but the ultimate goal, is for people to become more aware of their choices. I believe that we have the power to get together, organize, get a program, and institute that program. It doesn't make sense to recognize the truth and be dormant. We have to move.

A:

Gustaw - I don't know to be honest. This was meant to be a horror game for players who are not horror fans (made by players who are not horror fans), but after reading some comments I'm not sure anymore, as there are both people claiming that the game is not scary at all, and at the opposite end there are players who uninstalled the game after their first meeting with the Banshee... Maybe wait for some reviews?


Q:

It's not exactly clear. We do know from public testimony in 2013 that a $40 million shortfall from the recession was recovered through 200 layoffs (8% of the company). But many of these cuts are in broad categories in the budget records.

A:

lol. You caught him looking at it too?


Q:

To elaborate- what is your current opinion on the justice system? How it's progressed (for better or worse), any comparable cases' results you may've encountered, etc.

A:

I'd say all the devs that make the awesome unusual games are from poland.

See: Ice-pick Lodge Edit: actually they are russian, oops. They made some really weird but great games though


Q:

Not a question. A huge thank you from half way around the world, for keeping journalism alive.

A broad question: What keeps you going?

A:

I have faith in New Yorkers and people like Colin who want to fight to improve our legal system to have more justice for everyone. Because of people like Colin and Carl who are so committed to justice, I think there is optimism for progress. We've seen progress take place over the last five years. There were counties in New York where defendants did not have an attorney and had to negotiate plea deals themselves. But because of the Hurrell-Harring lawsuit the NYCLU brought, we've been able to change that. Change is possible, but there's a lot more work to be done. - Phil (NYCLU)


Q:

Gustaw - I'm afraid Ice-pick Lodge are Russian.

A:

My dog is my support system. http://imgur.com/a/WNJv2


Q:

What was your favorite food during the development process?

A:

How long was your investigation?

Do you have to 'prove' to your editors your case, much like a lawyer, before they publish to reduce the chance of libel/legal action?

Have you ever encountered having stories rejected as they are no longer 'topical' and if so, how do you move on from that, feeling perhaps justice wasn't served?


Q:

Gustaw - Kebab + vietanamese restaurant close by.

A:

The accident happened on June 29. We started working on a first story that published two weeks after. Then this story published a monthish after that.

Our editor was actually a strong proponent for this story. We do send the story to our lawyer and make sure she doesn't have any issues with the story.

I honestly haven't had an issue with stories getting rejected. My editor is pretty great and open to ideas. (He will shutdown bad ideas though, and generally rightfully so)


Q:

What do you guys use to learn programming so well? I am curious what kind of tutorials you used.

A:

I'm a high school journalism teacher. What advice can you offer about investigative journalism? What was the hardest part of this report?


Q:

Gustaw - In the beginning, I tried recreating other games, like Terraria. It was fun! Then I pretty much just went and experimented with stuff.

A:

Advice: Be persistent. Keep digging.

Hardest part: it was all pretty hard to be honest. Getting in touch with experts who knew about this specific technology, building the graphic in a easy to understand way, analyzing all of the relevant records to find useful information.


Q:

This looks fantastic! Why did you decide to do top down instead of an over the shoulder 3rd person or first person view?

A:

Is there any possibility of something like this happening else where in the states at similar power facilities? Is anyone looking into any other power facilities?


Q:

Gustaw - it was not a conscious decision actually. We started by making a "top-down tower defence game" that was going to be made... IN A MONTH ;) But then we saw that this had some real potential for heavy atmoshpere and the project grew and grew from then on. I guess this makes Darkwood pretty unique!

A:

From Kat above:

One of the first things we learned is that power plants are generally very safe. The procedure that caused the June 29 accident was specific to coal-fired power plants with a certain type of boiler (called a wet-bottom boiler). There aren't that many of them left.


Q:

How did the dog help?

A:

Gustaw - he defended our hideout with his life!


Q:

And what's his name?

A:

Szurek! (pronounced Shooreck!)


Q:

Can you share a photo of the dog?


Q:

Hey guys, congrats on all your achievements!

I'm a mid-30's guy in a completely different industry than game development who is currently seriously considering making a career switch. I have zero programming knowledge but tend to have a creative personality, and game making always fascinated me. I have the fortune of having started a very modestly successful business, so I would have some income from that to keep me going during my learning period. My family is supportive of my goals.

My question(s)... what has been the good and bad about changing careers at this point in life? While you were still figuring out game development, how much did you regret leaving your former jobs? What would you have done differently in the beginning to better prepare yourself for today?

A:

Gustaw - I don't miss any part of my past jobs. Working on Darkwood was great on many levels, but also very stressful. The industry is not what it was a few years back, and marking a indie game nowadays requires a lot of luck to be successful, so it's a great risk. I know many people who made games in which they invested a lot of time and money, and they flopped. In short - it can be a wonderful journey, but it's also a very risky one in the current state of the gaming industry.


Q:

Hey there! I never had any exposure to Darkwood until it released on Steam, whereupon I quickly bought it and have enjoyed six hours so far. It feels like if Sunless Sea had a kid with Dark Souls to me, in all the right ways.

Now that you've established a very heavy lore, where do you go from here? Expansion pack? Sequel with some of the side characters? You may have known the Darkwood world for five+ years in development. Tired of it. Saturated in it. Wanting to move on. Working on it /every day./ But for us fans, maybe we've only known hours of it, and would happily pay for more exposure in this world if the DLC was done right.

Thank you Acid Wizards, best of luck to you in the future!

A:

Gustaw - Actually no, we'd like to milk this cow dry! We already have a DLC planned for next week, where you can customize the protagonist's face in any way you wish! Too bad you won't see it from the top...

No but seriously, we don't know. We will have to talk about this after getting some rest and sleep (we're very, very tired right now). I love Darkwood, but this project was also a source of great frustration for me and made me neglect many aspects of my life. There is, however, a huge list of things that we wanted to implement, but we did not want to delay the game more. So who knows?


Q:

Tell us more about specific roles of each Wizard in your project. Is Artur can be called "Soul of Darkwood" as he worked on dialogues, characters and music design, videos etc.?

A:

Gustaw - Hi Ivan :D I would say Artur had by far the most influence on the project, but we have a very democratic process about pretty much anything in (and about) the game. It's part of the reason of why we're pretty slow in development, but that way Darkwood is the child of the man-love of all of us, and not a single person.


Q:

How are the characters "done"? For example, the Wolfman. Did you took photo of some dude in a coat, photoshopped wolf's head in and edited it slightly or is everything hand drawn?

A:

Artur - Every character is draw by hand, from scratch. I did not use photos as a backdrop to draw on (except the tractor for the Musician). I cut the image to parts and then sent to Kuba for him to animate.


Q:

Congratulations guys! It must feel great! At any point during development were you tempted to throw in the towel?

A:

Kuba - Everyone of us had nervous breakdowns from time to time... almost 5 years of developing is heck of a marathon. I recall begining of this project (after crowdfunding campaign - that one was stressful) as the best time.. propably one of best times in my life to be honest ! :slightly_smiling_face: People were really exited about darkwood, we were full of energy, we were working whole week, cause we wanted to! After some time things become more and more complicated. The deeper into the forest, the more trees...

Gustaw - I agree with Kuba. Making the Indiegogo video was extremely fun, as with most of the things that happened during that time (although the campaign was stressful). The continued delays weighed very heavily on me, I hope we will do a reset now and continue our next endeavors in a more relaxed way :)


Q:

You guys definitely deserve a little bit of a break! Thanks!

A:

Artur - the fact that people paid for Darkwood (especially during the Indiegogo campaign). On the one hand, it was very motivating. On the other, especially during the last 2 years, kept me awake at night.


Q:

Dudes. Your game is terrifying. I got it yesterday (steam watchlist) and the last time I've been so creeped out was playing Dark Descent.

I can only play for a few minutes at a time before I need a break. That's a compliment.

What are you planning for the future of the studio. Is horror "your thing"?

A:

Gustaw - Thanks! I don't know about the other wizards (we haven't had the time to talk about this), but most of my ideas on next games are not horror- related.


Q:

Are you planning a Playstation 4 release?

A:

Gustaw - we'd like to, yes! But currently there has been nothing done towards this, we've been to preoccupied with the PC release.


Q:

Has Silent Hill been an inspiration for you? 2 especially is what I consider the best horror game, especially since it's so atmosphere heavy

A:

Gustaw - I loved the game and it was a big inspiration (the rest of the team did not play it however, although it was a huge influence in terms of music).


Q:

Your wages came from the Indie Gogo campaign after you quit full-time. How do you decide a reasonable level of pay for all working in the project? Do you split it evenly, or for hours worked? Do you consider overtime? For a project where all the money is upfront, then equity after the games launch starting the cycle again for the next project, I've always wondered how you work out wages.

A:

Gustaw - our pay was split evenly, and we worked as much as we liked (which was pretty much all the time). Our pay was well, honestly the minimum to get by without having to worry about not making rent. This changed after the Early Access launch, and we had more funds to outsource some of the stuff we were not very good with (like rewriting the texts and translations).


Q:

I interviewed Gustaw over email for The University Observer in 2014/15! I was so excited for Darkwood because I hated the way 'horror' games were going!

How did you find Early Access? If you could create Darkwood again, without needing funding, would you choose early access again or go the traditional route?

Again, congrats on creating an amazing game. I look forward to what you do next!

A:

Gustaw - Hi! I guess that depends on the game we will want to do. Early Access was both a blessing and a curse for us. Thanks to it, we were able to finish Darkwood and benefit from the community's feedback. But it was also a source of great anxiety, as people were beginning to be angry about the delays.


Q:

Is there any interesting idea/character/creature cut from the game in early development that you would like to share with us?

Very happy about this, congratulations!

A:

Artur - At one point, the giant larvae location was cut from the game. You can see it on the second pre-alpha trailer (it was in the alpha for some time after that though). The talking generator was also removed. We wanted the player to gain the ability to talk to him after injecting a cerain amount of essence, but the ideas for actual implementation were too vague and he didn't make it for release. Null Winter, our moderator on the forums had a great idea of implementing a "tumor" that sits on the hotbar and talks to you, but it was very complex to implement. There was also a great idea about adding a mirrors mechanic to the game to play with the FOV, but it was too hard to make.

P.S Catch it CROWBORN ! ;) https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CVbPb_5W4AEr_Fq.png:large


Q:

What input did the dog have on the finished game?

A:

Gustaw - he defended our hideout bravely, but he actually made sounds for the Mutated Dog enemy in the game!


Q:

I hate jumpscares too! Question is though, if given the extra funding and/or time, would you do it in VR?

A:

Gustaw - Top-down in VR? That's a interesting proposition, we'll have to check it out ;)


Q:

Tell us a story of how you started making first concepts and ideas about Darkwood. How did you met with each other?

A:

Kuba - We met at the college. We were studying computer graphics/art. First concepts of darkwood started when Gustaw was making his firts steps in programming, we wanted to make our first quick game. It was somehing like tower defense/Home alone kind of thing. We were trying to do it in week or something like that... that thing evolved into DARKWOOD :smile:


Q:

Are you only saying this so we relax and get caught off guard by the jumpscares in your game?

A:

Gustaw - unfortunately no, but we will use this idea for our next game which will be solely jump scare based.


Q:

Are there any Plans for the Future like, DLC's or Free Updates to expand?

A:

Gustaw - At the time being, no. We have a huge list of stuff we wanted to implement, but did not have the time (or at least, we did not want to delay the game any further) to implement. Maybe a DLC, Darkwood 2, or something else entirely? Who knows. We will definitely try porting Darkwood to consoles though!


Q:

Will you be launching to other platforms, like PS4 or possibly Switch?

A:

Gustaw - we'd love to, but we can't confirm anything at this point.