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AuthorI am Brianna Goux, a 19 year old redditor who has published her first young adult sci-fi novel, AMA!

Sep 29th 2017 by BriannaMGoux • 27 Questions • 7476 Points

Proof is this picture of me wearing the shirt that I attended the speech in. It says "baby killer Erdogan!"

the moment of interruption

I am also a former fighter with the Kurdish People's Protection Units (YPG), fighting against ISIS in Syria. I am on the board of the nonprofit organization North American Kurdish Alliance, which helps to raise awareness of and promote solidarity with the Kurdish people. I'll start answering questions in just a few minutes.

Q:

What are giraffes even trying to do?

A:

Why is your username a credit card number ?


Q:

I'm not sure, but I'm glad they're trying to do it.

Fun fact: I got to feed giraffes once and I cried

A:

It's Erdogan's personal credit card #. Everyone please buy whatever you want.


Q:

There's a drive through safari park here in the UK where I live. You can buy a box of food and the giraffes come and stick their heads in the car to get some eats. It's so much fun.

Congratulations on the book! Think my daughter will love it.

EDIT: For those of you that asked it's West Midlands Safari Park in Kidderminster, UK. I haven't been for years but at one point went every birthday for a five year stretch. There used to be a monkey section too but they had to close it due to the monkeys royally screwing up cars.

A:

What do you foresee for the future of Kurds living in Turkey?


Q:

I might have to visit where you live then. . .

Thank you! I hope she does :)

A:

It's not looking great. Every day, Kurds are arrested, imprisoned, beaten, raped, tortured and executed for things as simple as speaking Kurdish with their families or singing Kurdish songs. The Turkish state has destroyed over 3,000 Kurdish villages I could continue with the list of atrocities committed against them but it would take all day.

The one bit of optimism I have is that people are becoming more and more aware of Erdogan/Turkish state crimes, and I think that soon the whole world will call on Turkey to stop what they are doing or face repercussions. Turkey is badly losing its war against Kurdish freedom fighters in the south. I think it will be a long, painful uphill battle for Kurds in Turkey to reclaim their rights, but I believe that it will happen some day.


Q:

Get to those really delicious leaves just up there a little higher . . .

A:

Every day, Kurds are arrested, imprisoned, beaten, raped, tortured and executed for things as simple as speaking Kurdish with their families or singing Kurdish songs.

Is there a source on this? I have no idea about the situation but some numbers would be great.


Q:

My g.f. is an extremely good writer but the distance between 'typing in a word document' and 'being published' seems intimidatingly vast to her.

What would you say where the steps (big or small) from aspiring to published?

A:

Thank you, appreciate it. Do you keep a rundown of sources I can keep on-hand by chance? I know I'm asking a lot but it would really help people spread and understand what you're saying - which I believe is the goal.


Q:

I would say that you can't look at it and see the end. You have to look at it and see the next step - that's her goal. Only after that she had to move on to the next step. She can keep publishing in mind, but the distance will be discouraging. She has to do it step by step. If she has a passion for writing and for what she's writing she just has to start the journey. It's vast, but it is SO worth it. Tell her I say good luck! She'll be there before she knows it!

Edit: forgot a word

A:

Our nonprofit is working on an information section of our website that has a detailed list of crimes against Kurds, so stay tuned and hopefully we can have something more comprehensive in the next few months.


Q:

I've often thought that SciFi is at its core a sociological genre - put normal human beings in outlandish situations and examine what the outcome of that may be.

Do you agree with that and what are some of the main themes you adress in this book?

A:

If you were magically put into a leadership role in the Kurdish independence movement, what would you do at this point?


Q:

Ohhhh, I like your view on that. I think that it could be, for certain novels, but I wouldn't put the whole genre in there. This is because there are books, like mine, where the main characters aren't human and therefore it creates a different balance of things. However, I could see the validity of your point in novels that do feature humans in outlandish situations. My main themes that are addressed within this book are ambition, coming of age, courage, discovery, and loss.

A:

Hm, that's a very tough question.

My main priority would probably be to get large foreign powers on our side. I would attempt to convince the US, UN and NATO that recognition of the Kurdish people is vitally important to stability in the Middle East, and would explain that Kurds are generally a more moderate and secular community compared to their neighbors. My being an American would enable me to have an easier dialogue with US/UN officials, and I could use that to convince these world powers to use their strength to protect Kurdish people.


Q:

Thanks for the reply!

I think that even in books that feature primarily or solely non-human characters the main scope would still fall under sociology, since it is impossible to be completely divorced from our own humanity. It would then be a view of humanity through an alien lens, but still a human view by necessity. Because if it were to be fully alien then there would be nothing for a human reader to identify themselves with.

In the seminal "The Dance of the Changer and Three" by Terry Carr the only human character is the narrator who tries to explain this fully alien story to a human audience and coming to the conclusion that the story must be taken as is, because they are alien any human interpretation of this story that is so important to this alien culture must always fall flat because we cannot ever completely understand their psychology.

The Dance of the Changer and Three teaches us that whatever we do, we will always be locked inside our own skulls, viewing the universe through human eyes.

I wish you the best and hope your book is a great success. :)

A:

I'm hung up on the thought process that a Kurdish state would lower tensions in the middle East. Wouldn't that state just become a Target of Iran, Iraq, syria, S.A.? Would the Kurdish state turn into another Israel where either they need one of the best militaries globally or they would parish?


Q:

That sounds interesting- I'll have to give it a read!

Thank you so much for your support!

A:

I didn't say anything about a state. Just that someone should recognize their plight and protect their right to live freely.


Q:

You definitely should, it's a great short story!

I looked, but it doesn't seem to be available online in a full version. But I'm sure you can find a book of short stories that has it for very little money online. It's been reprinted a lot.

A:

Wait, so you want independence without becoming a nation state? Because I can't really grasp how that would work out.


Q:

Awesome, I'll put it on my to read list!

A:

I support self-determination and levels of autonomy, which doesn't always mean nation-state.


Q:

How much have you spent, out of pocket, from start to finish?

A:

Do you think the attempted coup was staged?


Q:

So far about less than 1,000. The editor was paid for by my parents who are awaiting me to pay them back every penny. So including what I owe my parents I'll be at about 5,000. I could've paid them back before, but they don't want me to deplete my savings.

A:

The whole thing is so damn shady I'm not sure what to think. I don't know if it was staged, but it kind of gives me 1933-Reichstag-vibes.

Erdoğan's claim that Gülen was involved is dubious. Erdoğan's political game is to blame everything on either the PKK or Gülen when he loses his tenuous grasp on power. German intelligence is doubtful that Gülen was involved in any way, and considering Germany has found Turkish state infiltration of their police and the Turkish government has spied on German politicians, that's saying a lot.

I do know that if the state wasn't involved, they at least knew about it well in advance. I wouldn't be surprised if later intelligence was uncovered that showed that the government was somehow involved in deeper levels.


Q:

Thank you for answering this. I didn't expect it, but I really appreciate the honesty.

A:

I know there are different groups such as PKK, PYD, YPG, KRG, KDP. I’ve seen some of them called “terrorists” by Turkish supporters and honestly it’s a bit confusing as an outsider to distinguish between these groups. Would you consider any of them not inline with the good intentions of the Kurds as a whole, or using questionable tactics?

Edit: grammar


Q:

I always try to be honest. Unfortunately some people on here think I'm a lying trust fund baby :(

A:

Oh man, so I'll try and tl;dr it. Bear with me.

PKK = Kurdistan Workers Party. Been around since the 70s and originated in Turkey. The leader and founding member of PKK, Abdullah Ocalan, has been imprisoned for 18 years. Turkey managed to use their power to get them on the NATO and US terror lists, and now many countries are regretting that decision, such as Belgium.

PYD = Democratic Union Party. The majority political party within the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria (also called Rojava in Kurdish) Formed in 2003, but suppression kept them on the periphery until YPG started making gains against ISIS.

YPG = People's protection units. Armed militia, mostly Kurds but also Arabs and other minority groups, in Northern Syria/Rojava. They have made immense strides against ISIS.

KRG = Kurdistan Regional Government. Semi autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan (Bashur). Controlled by the KDP and PUK parties, which have roots in the tribal politics of the area.

KDP = political party within KRG. KRG is governed by PUK party, affiliated with Talebani, and the KDP political party, which is controlled by Massoud Barzani, who is closely allied with Erdogan. You can probably guess how I feel about KDP.


Q:

I think people are overusing trust fund, but you seem to be blessed with a nicer upraising than a good chunk of people. That is why they are being like that.

Not to many people can get their folks to give them 4k without wanting to be paid back.

I wouldn't be offended by it, I'd be proud that my family did well and are supportive

A:

Can you tell us what your time in YPG was like and what conditions the YPG fought (and continue to fight) against?

How did you leave YPG? Did you just leave or is there a official process for leaving?

Feel free not to answer this one, how did a former YPG fighter return to the US? Are you a citizen of the US? A US citizen cannot join YPG without consequences, so I imagine you are not a citizen?

What assistance is ACTUALLY making it to the YPG from the US? Did you ever see any form of aid from the the US? I understand we provide fire support but what about equipment and water?

And lastly, what kinds of G-men came to talk to you after the incident with security?


Q:

Not trust fund, but I was blessed with a nice upraising. I'm glad they're supportive of me :)

A:

Time in the YPG was rough as you could expect in any conflict zone. The camaraderie was amazing, like nothing I've seen before. Right now they're limited by the embargo against them from both KRG (Iraqi Kurdistan) and Turkey. A lot of times vital resources cannot cross the borders.

I just left. My tour was over so I was dropped off in Kobanê and made my way out in the same way I entered.

I am a US citizen. I've had no problems upon return. I've been spoken to by customs, and by FBI twice. They haven't hassled me and have been very respectful. Most other American YPG I know haven't had much problem either. The story is different in places like U.K.

The coalition forces provide a lot of support to YPG included mortar and sniper teams, air strikes, MRAPs, weapons and ammunition, medical supplies and other vehicles. They were always around - US, French, UK. Many of them were advisors.

I was handcuffed, led to the basement and questioned by US Secret Service, NYPD, Marriott Security, and Turkish intelligence. Eventually I told them to get the Turkish guy out of the room or I wouldn't cooperate, as he was attempting to provoke myself and my friends and get our information. The US guys made him leave.

The FBI called me afterwards and asked what happened, as the FBI had visited my house a couple weeks ago after someone anonymously called and told them I was in ISIS. However I've never had any problem with the FBI and they seem to understand that any changes of terrorism are bogus.


Q:

How much time do you spend in a day writting?

A:

What's your opinion on the YPG and SAA meeting up near Deir EzZor? Do you think there will be conflict or that they'll be able to work something out?


Q:

Usually less than an hour. I'm busy with school and work right now so I don't write enough :(

A:

I hope they can arrange some sort of agreement and each stay on the opposite sides of the river. YPG doesn't need another enemy right now.


Q:

How long were you able to keep the costume on the cat?

A:

How are there so many Erdogan supporters in the US?


Q:

About three minutes. . . and the entire time I was holding her to take the picture while she was trying to gouge my eyes out and get the thing off. She now likes to "hunt" the costume and kill it for its evil deeds.

A:

I would imagine it's because Turkish citizens living abroad are still able to vote in Turkish elections. The government frequently send Turks to campaign in other countries to convince people to vote for Erdogan.


Q:

It is all written on her face.

A:

How bad did you get your ass beat? And any word on repercussions against the ass beater(s)?


Q:

I thought it was hard to tell ;)

A:

I was punched multiple times on all sides of my head, several times in the back of the neck, and a few times in the stomach. As I was being dragged out by security, people were continuing to take shots at me as I was completely incapacitated and being carried away.

I went to a doctor to document my injuries the day afterwards. I had some contusions on my right shoulder from where the crowd was attempting to pull me away from the security forces escorting me out. I had a couple abrasions on my scalp. The punches are giving me painful muscle spasms in the neck, (kind of like whiplash, it was explained to me) hopefully these will go away as I use the muscle relaxer the doctor prescribed me.

After the incident, when I was handcuffed and detained in the hotel's basement, I asked about pressing charges against my attackers and was told that because "I started it", I had no grounds to press charges. When I asserted that I have a right to free speech and the crowd did not have a right to assault me, the NYPD threatened to arrest me and charge me with criminal trespass, so I stayed silent. However, I have not given up on the idea of pressing charges, and I hope that some of the men whose faces are clearly visible in the footage can be identified.


Q:

I also came for the cat..congrats on book tho :)

A:

So who actually attacked you? This is what is unclear to me.


Q:

Thank you :)

A:

It's hard to figure out, we are working on identifying some of them. Because Erdogan's security guards just wears suits, we can't tell who attacked whom. Plus, I was face down for much of the incident.


Q:

How is your last name pronounced?

A:

I guess my line of thinking is that if it's private security, sue the shit out of them.

Also it's pretty dogshit for the NYPD to not look more into an assault just because you were also possibly committing a crime. Maybe it's because of the different state but for us if there's an assault we at least long form it and give the CA a chance to decide if charges are warranted, regardless if the victim was also involved in something criminal.


Q:

Goo

A:

Hopefully as we ID more people we can find out more about the routes we can take


Q:

Goo?

A:

Did you hope to accomplish anything?


Q:

Yup!

A:

Our goal was to make sure Erdogan knew that when he leaves the confines of his safe space in Turkey, he will be challenged and called out for his heinous crimes against humanity. We intended to garner support and media attention, while at the same time shutting down his speech. I would say we accomplished quite a bit.


Q:

Can you detail out your experiences with "publishing?" I see a lot of comments in awe of this, frankly, trivial thing.

I know of many YA authors who have agents and publishers that will not touch anyone who is self-published, and contractually require them to abstain from doing so. If something was already self-published, it will never be picked up for major publication. Maybe in the early days where that was still an interesting rags to riches story, but I was surprised to find how vilified that process is when to me it sounds like the definition of proactivity.

I am assuming that you've essentially self-published your novel, and did not go through Big Publishing to do it, else you wouldn't be running your own AMA and would be linking to / referring to your publishers as required by contract.

Further, you spoke about carrying the novel "through editing." Did you self-edit, or have an editor review? Especially with YA, an editor's role is aligned completely with a publisher because they will edit the story to increase target audience stickiness + product potential, so it isn't merely proofreading.

Any marketing or ad budget (besides word-of-mouth social like this AMA)?

Did you consult anyone regarding these issues? Were you aware of them?

Or did you simply DIY the whole thing?

I'm interested to know as again the aspiring writers I work with all seem to have the same issue of self-publishing leading to success being a fairy tale pushed by those interested to profit from mass amounts of self-publishing, and for NYT bestseller levels you will either not find or see a cover-up regarding their self-publishing days.

Good luck!

A:

What would your view on the actions of the group called PKK be? are they terrorists?


Q:

The industry has changed a lot in recent years. Self-publishing is becoming bigger for first time authors as it is becoming harder and harder to traditionally publish with the decline of sales for physical books. I've found through going to conferences and asking publishers and agents specifically about this issue that many are changing their views to pick up authors whose self-published work sells well. All that said, I also may never go traditional. I enjoy having control over my novel and final say on everything regarding it. That's just my opinion. However, I believe that if I chose to go the traditional route with a publishing house that I wouldn't have an issue finding a publisher to pick up my novel if it sells well.

As for editing I had a professional editor that I worked with for a year and a half on making sure this manuscript was the best it could be. Not all editors are aligned with publishers these days, and the editing the story to cater to a crowd is the opposite of what I wanted. Writing is my passion, I'm not in it for the money, and I'm going to stay true to my writing and my stories.

As for marketing I am fortunate enough to know a world-class marketer who is helping me market my novel.

I consulted a lot of people and have been to several writing conferences where I have been able to ask the professionals these question so I did not go into this process blind. I was well informed about the flaws and issues that come with this process.

The world of writing is ever changing and I believe in what I'm doing and how I'm doing it. I'm not in it for the money. I write because it's my passion- everything else is a bonus.

A:

I can't bring myself to call them a terrorist organization. I have spoken to so many Kurds who owe their lives to PKK. They are a reactionary movement to a ruthlessly genocidal state. They are far from perfect and I don't agree with all of their tactics, but how can you mercilessly oppress an entire ethnic group for decades and then act surprised and outraged when they fight back?


Q:

What conferences are you going to? I would kill to meet and talk to publishers and agents in person.

A:

One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter.

Patriots in the American revolution, Jacobite uprisings, etc.


Q:

Conference in Seattle, there's a big yearly one that the Seattle Writer's puts on for a whole weekend. Google for conferences near you!

A:

They are not justifiable, and just like I said, I don't agree with all of their tactics. Belgian court just said they're not terrorists, and so have many other groups. But understand that this is a reactionary movement and there is active debate about whether or not PKK is a terrorist organization - Belgium urged the EU member states to adopt the same policy.


Q:

You did well to hire and editor and seek the help of that marketer, but you should definitely be prepared for an uphill battle. That marketer is going to be your best friend, so definitely seek their advice as this continues.

I just wanted to let you know, from someone who self-published eight books and is currently trying to sneak into traditional publishing, that writing and releasing the book is much, much easier than the rest of the process. Keep a strong hand on your social media, post every day, but mostly don't assume people will want to read your book or automatically respect you for self-publishing.

In fact, it's the opposite. Readers want any chance to be distracted away from your work, and it's up to you to make them care enough about you to read your book. Writing YA makes that easier because you have a larger base that's easier to manage, but keeping up with your platform is still going to be the toughest part of your job.

That said, this AMA has (relatively) exploded, so I wish you the best of luck and that your head is always full of stories.

A:

Are you a former US serviceman? Where did you get military training for fighting with the YPG?


Q:

I'm well prepared for the uphill battle! I know that a lot of people aren't going to take me seriously and it's going to be hard. But I'm ready and I'm confident.

A:

Never been in the military before. Training was all in the YPG.


Q:

Did you find it hard to write the length? I love writing but I always give up a few chapters in.. I can't get the length.

A:

Do you have proof that you were in the YPG?


Q:

No, it was more of I was writing while on a road trip with my family and all the sudden it hit me that I had a book. I was just continuing and moseying along with it. That's probably not helpful, but if you find the right project you'll never want to stop working on it.

A:

Yes. here is a picture of me in uniform, and with former YPG spokesman Redur Xelil.


Q:

Young Adult can mean a lot of things... is this book appropriate for 10-12 year olds? Or is it more aimed at a high school audience?

A:

How do you feel about the hundreds of thousands of western tourists who funnel money into Turkey every year?
Have you guys ever thought about buying airtime and ad space in these places with some information about what is really happening there. Most of these people seem oblivious to what they are contributing to.


Q:

It's aimed at anyone from 10-15 give or take; however, I'm hoping to write it in the way Harry Potter is done. That is, I want to start with aiming my novel at the younger portion of readers (10-13) and have the books grow in maturity with them.

A:

It's really disheartening to see. There's such a dark side that they don't even know about. We have done campaigns against Turkey before, my nonprofit North American Kurdish Alliance helped rent a truck that drove around NYC during the UN Assembly. It could be part of another campaign in the future.


Q:

How hard was it to scrap everything you'd been working on since the age of 12, and start over? Was it a gradual process, like a Ship of Theseus type of thing... replacing a few paragraphs here and there, and then you realize you've rewritten everything... or was it more one night you just opened up a new Word document and started over?

A:

What do you think about Israel/Palestine issue . And its paralels to the Kurdish issue?


Q:

So I actually started my first draft on a type-writer that my grandmother had given me. When I was transferring it from there to word I realized that the story sucked, so I pulled out the pieces I liked and threw away what I didn't. What I was left with was the first half of the plot, and my main characters. From there I reshaped it, and rewrote about 75% of it. I didn't like the other one as much, and the ending wasn't true to the book. It wasn't too hard because it was never a job to me- I've always loved the story and the world I got to play in when writing it. For me it wasn't work so I didn't see the set-back in scrapping everything.

A:

I am not educated enough about Israel/Palestine to draw parallels to the Kurds


Q:

I saw in a previous question that you admire Bradbury's writing style and J.K. Rowling's plot/character development. In a similar vein, what do you hope to your audience commends you for after reading Amara's rose?

Also, was there anything in particular that inspired the storyline for your book?

A:

Hello. Did you expect to be attacked in that way?

Did the world media cover it accurately?

Do you think the plight of the Kurds is becoming more mainstream in the deserved sympathy ?


Q:

My dream I've had for what I want to be remembered for is for writing those strong female characters that girls can identify with. I think YA Sci-fi needs more badass female characters without a plot that predominantly follows a love interest. Girls kick ass without men just fine. I want to write characters that people can identify with and really relate to. My storyline was actually inspired by an adventure I had with my friend one day. We were playing make believe when I was younger (it had to do with dragons) and we looked up in the sky and saw this bright ball of light (that wasn't the sun) that dissipated after a minute. So, naturally, we incorporated that into our game as the portal to the dragon world. Thinking back on this incident years later as I was walking through the same woods we were playing in that day got me thinking and from that came this book!

A:

I absolutely expected the assault. This makes 4 times that Americans have been attacked for protesting against Erdogan.

The world media had its ups and downs. Lots of outlets did a great job of covering it, BBC put out a good report. However, a lot of media outlets, I think in an attempt to be unbiased, ended up being fallacious. Many of them called this a "brawl", a "clash", and claimed that "fistfights" erupted between us and the Erdogan supporters. All of the video evidence shows that no protestors fought back - this was a very one-sided assault.

Every day I have more people reach out to me on social media; people from all parts of the world, all political affiliations, and all walks of life want to know more about the Kurdish cause. Information on crimes against the Kurds is easily accessible online. People who find out about these problems sympathize with Kurds almost immediately - I think it's just a matter of making people aware of the issues.


Q:

Hey there! How would you describe your leap from writing short stories to a full fledged book? Was it a gradual development or did you decide one day "I want these particular characters to be in a novel." Also how do you feel after finishing your first book? Did you immediately start thinking about what was next or was it a bittersweet moment?

A:

What was daily life like fighting with the YPG? How did you end up joining up with them?


Q:

It was a gradual development. When I first started writing this novel it was a short story. When I finished it was bittersweet, but I wanted to make this a series so I started in on the second book.

A:

In the front, just a lot of moving around, trying not to step on mines, and getting shot at sometimes. In the rear, a lot of boredom and sitting around waiting. Guard duty usually every night. The main difference was lack of creature comforts, I guess, but I really didn't mind that part much.

They have information online if you search enough, after some exchanged emails I was headed to Northern Syria. They don't actively recruit but there are ways to contact them.


Q:

You're graduating from college at 20?!?

A:

Did you guys hit back? Also next protest will you guys bring more protestors and give his bodyguards an good American beat down?


Q:

I'm actually graduating at 19! I cheated though and did my first two years while also doing my last two years of high school via a program called running start.

A:

None of us fought back. Even if I wanted to, my arms and legs were pinned or held down from the moment I was taken to the floor by Erdogan's supporters.

While I can't say I dislike the idea of giving the guards a taste of their own medicine, I imagine that we would look pretty unsympathetic in the media if we were to fight back. Many media outlets are already calling this a "brawl" or a "clash", instead of the one-sided beat down that it actually was. Though certainly a bigger opposition would have been better in terms of keeping the security busier and creating more chaos.


Q:

Trust me as a mentor of many high achieving teens and college students stick around and have fun in college for another year or two with people your age. Unless you really, really don't want to for some reason. Everyone I know who has graduated early and rushed on has regretted it. I'm 32 btw and have self-published and ghost-written sci-fi, historical fiction, and non-fiction in my 20s. Congrats on finishing book 1!

A:

I'm a bit late but i'm curious about your thoughts regarding Rojava?


Q:

I've heard that, but it's not financially in the cards for me

A:

I love Rojava. It's one of the most amazing human experiments I have ever seen. They're in the process of creating stability in the wake of incredible atrocity and violence. There are many problems but they are the best hope among all factions in Syria.


Q:

Hi there! Thanks for doing an AMA.

I assume you're a reader, not just a writer--how did you get into reading? Who are some of your favorite authors? How did you decide to go with intergalactic adventures, as opposed to...literally any other genre? Do your many animal companions play a role in this novel? Also, how do you feel about onions?

Most importantly: which Teen Titan, and why?

A:

Thanks for responding! Could you expand on what you see as their biggest problems,and biggest threats?

What is a western person like me to do to support that community, to help build the world we'd like to live in?

Any hurdles that others can assist in?


Q:

Starting off with the most important question: the original because the humour was so on point and the characters felt more real than whatever Teen Titans Go! Has going on right now. I adore the one I grew up with.

Yes! I've always been a reader. I remember learning to read with my dad specifically when I was younger and his mother was an English teacher so she fostered the love of reading in me as a child. I attribute my love of literature and writing to her. She passed away two years ago this month and I miss her everyday.

Favorite authors are Ray Bradbury, J.K. Rowling, Jane Austen, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

To be honest I adore classics. My dad bought be a bunch for Christmas when I was 12 and I've been hooked ever since. I started writing about intergalactic travels though because I wanted to write worlds where I'm not bound by traditional rules that we have here on Earth. I wanted limitless possibilities and adventure.

Edit: because my fingers slipped and posted this before I was actually done

A:

The biggest threat is absolutely Turkey. They have been making incursions into Northern Syria and murdering civilians with artillery, particularly in Efrin canton and between Efrin and Manbij city.

You can support by making your representatives aware of issues with Kurds, or finding your local Kurdish/leftist solidarity community and working with them. I've linked to my nonprofit in the comment of this thread, we are always looking for assistance.