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AcademicI'm a professor who has published books on Star Wars and Blade Runner, AMA

Oct 14th 2017 by willbrooker • 48 Questions • 6366 Points

I do stand-up comedy, I write, I act, and I do a podcast called WTF with Marc Maron. My producer Brendan McDonald and I wrote Waiting for the Punch, a book that uses hundreds of interviews from the podcast to help understand what it means to be alive. Let’s talk. (Brendan is here too and he’ll sign any questions he answers with ‘BM.’)

Proof: https://i.redd.it/jswmb2g669qz.jpg

That was fun. We've got to run to a thing. Thanks everyone for talking and asking and listening. If you preordered Waiting for the Punch, thank you so much. If you didn't, go get yourself a copy. We think you'll really enjoy it.

Boomer Lives!

Q:

Who is the most powerful force user batman could beat in a fight, and how would the fight go down?

A:

Huge Curb fan. What's your favorite Curb scene you've done? Mine is "Get in that ass, Larry."

Honorable Mention to "She didn't come upstairs because she was coming downstairs."


Q:

I just wanted to say how much I miss your show. It seems like after it was cancelled all television kind of went to hell. Any chance we'll ever get to see another sitcom from you?

A:

You get free tickets?


Q:

Hi AnJu91, I think we would be in a lot of trouble if that were the case. Maybe we are :)

This would definately help disrupt the process of radicalization.

If you look at the videos on our website or read our white paper, we have spent a significant amount of time researching radicalization of every type and invariably it comes from a number of factors, but most importantly a lack of context/the Dunning-Kruger effect.

We have also written this up here:

https://medium.com/ananas-blog/extremism-and-mount-stupid-5afa0eec7d4e

Our platform allows every major Muslim group (or groups from any other ideology) to map their beliefs in a transparent manner with reference to the core holy text, the Qu'ran, in this case.

Putting this in a dynamic digital format allows for indepth analysis showing where logical inconsistencies come in.

In the case of Islamic extremism our research has narrowed it down to a certain adaption of Ibn Taymiyyah's conceptualisation of siyasa shariah and a selective reading of the texts given (Sunni) Islamic jurisprudence is a balance of subjectivity and objectivity.

The key element that has been denuded is one of "reasonable doubt", that actually informed western common law, aka shubha. Dr Intisar Rabb at Harvard has a good book on this in the classical Sunni corpus that most Muslims adhere to.

This project within a few years will be able to tell definitively what "mainstream" Muslims actually believe and which parts are firm dogma/core parts of belief and which bits aren't.

Our view from our research is that most Muslims are not working from a religion of evil/hate and this contextual creation will help disrupt the radicalisation of those that turn bad.

A:

What was the part of the day you looked forward to most when you lived in north korea?


Q:

One of the biggest criticisms I've seen against your work is that it overly romanticizes physical and mental illness. What is your response to this criticism?

A:

Did you have a bit of a drink before playing with the Foo Fighters the other night?


Q:

Hey, Marc, big fan since Thinky Pain, just had a quick question for you. Did you ever find the Beefheart?

A:

With prep, I think Batman would be able to find a way to disrupt and neutralise the Force - using ysalamiri, if we were still in the old Star Wars EU - which would reduce any Force user to simply a very good duellist with a light saber.

Batman is also a great hand-to-hand duellist, having fought Ra's al Ghul with scimitars (I'm not going to be able to provide links and scans here), so I think he would be able to best, for instance, young Obi-Wan, Qui-Gon, Anakin in his prime, Count Dooku or Maul, if their Force powers were neutralised, and if Batman was also armed with a light saber.

If Batman couldn't find a way to neutralise the Force abilities, I think the strongest he could beat is Vader in A New Hope, as he looks pretty slow and rusty. Even against Vader in Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, I think Batman could disable Vader's mechanical suit with an electromagnetic pulse easily enough, rendering him helpless, and could probably even hack into Vader's life support.

Whether this would work against the Vader who seems to be in his prime at the end of Rogue One is a different matter.

Without prep, encountering a Force user for the first time, I think Batman would lose.

With prep, I think he would have a good chance against anyone we see in the official movies, and could 8/10 Darth Vader in all films except Rogue One.

That's my quick answer.


Q:

I love both!!! This car chair is a fuck machine!!!! LOL!!!

A:

Yeah, I was in charge of all of it and when I went away everything just sucked. Except for Breaking Bad. Honestly I am working on a new show for me and Billy Gardell and another one called "Devils Music." It's all a crap shoot though.


Q:

I had a "Self Admission Pass" that could get me into the parks for free whenever I wanted. I also earned 3 guest passes for every 150 hours I worked.

A:

Hiya! Thanks for the question. I understand, fear is powerful.

But I'm curious and honestly very skeptical about those numbers - do you mind linking me to the video?

Best, Marco


Q:

Whenever I had something delicious to eat! I really looked forward to preparing the food and enjoying it with my family.

A:

I've tried very hard to fight against both the stigmatization and the romanticization of mental and physical illness. That's pretty much entirely what my new book is about. And if I've failed, in this book or elsewhere, I'm sorry.


Q:

What do you reckon?

A:

Yeah, I got a handle on it.


Q:

I find your lack of faith disturbing.

However, your faith in Batman isn't entirely without merit.

A:

WTF is a-jak-a-lit??


Q:

Is there any you will ever come back to Montreal ?? I would love to see you live

A:

That's how they do that nowadays? It used to be we could bring 3 guests with us any day, any time for free (except for special events).
Also, here's the obligatory "What time does the 12:00 Mickey's Main Street Parade start and where?"
(It's been almost 20 years so forgive me if I messed up the quote).


A:

Was there a certain event that happened in your life in North Korea that made you decide you wanted to escape?


Q:

What’s your advice for getting through your hardest mental health days?

Also, I would like you to know that because of TFIOS and Nerdfighteria, I met my future wife! DFTBA!

A:

Wil you do this again when ur drunk please?


Q:

We good?

A:

Batman with prep can beat Superman, so I think he is a formidable opponent.


Q:

One of my favs!!!!

A:

I love the festival I want to go back but Canada needs to have real money first. I love the monopoly aspect of it but it makes me uneasy.


Q:

This just goes to show everyone how often Disney changes things up. It’s actually the 3 o clock parade now, but yes that’s still a question CM’s get a lot. The reason they changed the guest pass rule for interns is because there used to be people who would apply for the College Program for the sole purpose of getting free tickets. They would work for a couple weeks, use their guest passes to take their whole family on a free vacation, then quit. Because of this, Disney made a rule that CM’s have to work to earn their guest passes.

A:

Thanks for link! I actually had time to find it during the comment issues, and I personally see it as an example of how often, truth lies in between opinions

Politifact did an analysis that at the very least shows that Shapiro’s statement shouldn’t be taken at face value. Looking at the same sources he used, and his reasoning, getting to that number requires a bit (one might even say a lot) of cherry-picking of sources and the definition of ‘radical’.

“Shapiro said that a majority of Muslims are radicals. To make his numbers work, he had to cherry-pick certain results from public opinion surveys. Given the choice between two possible percentages, he chose the higher one. Shapiro also relied heavily on the idea that anyone who supported sharia law is a radical.”

Data is one thing, but validity of interpretation is another. The same goes for ‘radical’ and ‘sharia’: They’re not the same. Using the exact sources as Shapiro (Pew), but other measures of radical (such as supporting suicide bombing), Politifact reaches a much lower percentage of 19%.

One can argue that this is enough reason for concern and to justify intervention, but that also raises the question of why there is a need at all to distort the reality, effectively fearmongering.

Thanks for the question! ~Marco


Q:

My step-mother wanted me to get married and I wasn't ready. I was only 18 and needed to find a way to make money to provide for myself. I thought I could go to China and find a well-paying job.

A:

That's amazing! How did you met, and are you getting married soon? Also, are you registered anywhere?

EDIT: I just realized I didn't answer your question. I am not a psychologist, and do not feel qualified to give advice to people who are suffering from mental health problems. I can only speak to my experience, and my experience has been that on the worst days, I just have to survive minute to minute to minute and know that it WILL GET BETTER, because it will. It truly will. Your now is not your forever.


Q:

of course

A:

Yes


Q:

With prep, Batman

r/whowouldwin just had a collective orgasm because of this.

A:

Hey JB,

Huge fan of you as Leon in Curb. I got two questions:

Do you see yourself becoming more like Larry or is Larry becoming more like you as time goes on?

What’s your ideal breakfast?


Q:

First off, I’m a big fan!

Your comedy has always been extremely personal in subject matter. This may seem like an obvious question, but has making light of those events in your life made things, for lack of a better word, easier to cope with and process?

A:

How many people approximately does Disney employ in Florida?


Q:

It's the fastest way to describe it. I'm still figuring it out as i study and learn.

A:

How does the Korean spoken in the South differ from the North?


Q:

I met my girlfriend 5 years ago in Cincinnati at your book signing. I want to propose now, but don't know how. Any advice?? See you again soon at Cinci!

A:

Would you sing a song Noel wrote you if he offered it to you for your solo album?


Q:

So when are you and Randy Newman putting out an album together?

A:

I am a regular reader of r/whowouldwin!


Q:

Leon is rubbing off on Larry... shrimp and grits!

A:

Yep, stopped me from killing a bunch of people in a KFC. ( I used to work there) Once I put all the pain and bull in joke form it became absurd, funny and easier to deal with. My family won't talk to me though... because I have shredded them. I understand.


Q:

On average, 75,000.

A:

Loving this discussion, thank you! Please let me know if I made a mistake in disambiguating your reasoning:

On Crypto & Karma

Reddit is above anything else the perfect example of the powerful incentive naturally that emerges when you combine 1. Ecological community structure (one that maps on something relevant to identity) and 2. Distinguishable validation.

Reddit is a testament to the first in creating a diverse community, preventing homogeneity on a platform due to that structure. It is in a way also a testament to the second, but only to how powerful incentives can be even if functionally it is ultimately empty. Important here is the question - what does it incentivise? What kind of behaviour and themes in behaviour (culture) does it lead to?

Reddit doesn't have an ulterior goal - its goal is purely endogenous. It incentivises above all to contribute to content - comments, collations, conversations, community efforts etc. The only 'meta' goal is that the content itself is desirable to its users, but again this raises the questions of what kind of content the collective judgment of the users generates. This question on the incentive system isn't really a problem that extends further than (the sub)reddits - people upvote what they like, people like upvotes, and that's how the circle closes. Like you say:

because the community believes the content is quality (or at least worth talking about).

Their belief on what content is quality (and what norms apply) does not necessarily and does not often align with more objective measures of quality or desirable (cultural) norms. The boston bomber, pizza-gate, hateful/hostile subreddits, all in a way reflect this fact.

Ananas however, does have an ulterior goal, does need to think very clearly about the effect of the incentivise system on content, about the behavioural science involved. The fact that it's not a major issue in reddit is reflected in the pervasive presence of hive-minds, circle-jerks, and deterioration of quality as subreddits grow or lose its internal sovereignty. 'Identity' relates to this as well, but on that later.

So the necessity for a more sophisticated incentivisation structure is clear. So why crypto? Obviously it's not a necessity.

Another important distinction is the fact that Reddit first and foremost is entertainment, low effort. Lurkers >>> contributors. And that's okay - as users increase, contributors do - and you don't need a strict contributor:lurkers ratio for things to work. It's just about the absolute size of the contributors that relates to the generation of content. It's non-substractive consumption. 'Consuming' content doesn't reduce the pool of content for others.

More importantly, this leaves only karma, social validation, and (implicit and explicit) forms of marketing as incentive. One of the most straightforward benefits of crypto is that it allows the prospect of real-world/non-local utility to be gained as an incentive. But it doesn't stop here of course, or it'd just be steemit which probably is far from the ideal scenario, even if I do admit it to be a cool experiment. Specifically, just adding real-world value doesn't deal with the problems rooted in the behavioural science behind incentive structures.

You want a measure to modulate incentive that is reliably attenuates or eliminates not only the group-psychological / behavioural dilemmas, but also the added incentive to game the system or leverage the 'power' of money.

This is where smart contracts and the long-term vision of autonomy made possible with AI-related systems comes into play. Firstly, the above illustrates that there is an enormous impact of whatever determines the incentives. It is imperative to minimise the risk that some centralised/coordinated power can control this incentive system, ideally implementing an adequate initial template with rigid constraints of how this incentive system can develop, and leaving the development to collective governance.

Secondly, because the incentive structure has such a big effect on how content is created - in turn its quality and utility/societal value - creating an infrastructure optimised for societal value also aligns the goals of all token holders and the ecosystem's participants with that of the entire platform. Even more interestingly, is if the artificial knowledge system and capacity to augment human efforts (see this write-up by Emad and future publications) improves, the relation between individual contribution and reward becomes increasingly proportional.
On Reddit, people often give gold because they agree with you, or because it's a particularly good pun, which feels nice, but the sad fact is that sophisticated insight often gets buried, and seemingly sophisticated but misleading perspectives can often get stuck in false-positive due to early validation. The objective measures that the artificial approaches allow prevent the deterioration of this reward-contribution relation, and actually augment it. Psychologically, this would be enormously powerful.

The thing is, if it all takes off well and becomes a universal database for subjective knowledge, there is enormous incentive to gain some control over it. To align the incentive systems with the societal goals sustainably over generations and organisational change requires an isolation from those sources of fluctuation. A plan we're considering to achieve this protection is to formally implement the correct constraints as soon as is clear what this should be, in something immutable - the blockchain.

I think this is the key insight I hope people will take away. You can't have the individual ingredients alone. For the ideal of a sustainable solution you need all the ingredients in synergy. Powerful incentive structures aligned with a global imperative of external and translatable utility value (in our case, societal good/value), bound by sustainable and secure autonomy.

On corruption

I already touched on some means with which to prevent corruption, but I just wanted to highlight one more set of key mechanisms: staking and rewards.
Staking is like a security deposit of varying size, signifying you vouch for a certain action with a corresponding potential impact. Similarly, contributing to domains of particular significance/impact also correspond to higher rewards, with an added mechanism of bounties - people can put bounties on certain projects of a non-prescriptive nature.

For example, you can't put a bounty up for "prove all dogs should die". Aside from the fact that I love dogs, a non-prescriptive bounty would be "what is the moral stance on dogs for a curated set of beliefs X".

Key here is that this system inverts the functional role of wealth in influence. Money buys you ads and people's support and influence by proxy, it's proportional. In contrast, in our current ecosystem's design it not only has a very conservative upper bound, it actually directly inverts the proportional relation! Why? Well if someone puts up a big bounty or submits something of particularly high impact, it naturally incentivizes people to be scrutinise particularly thoroughly, because when the stake is lost it's redistributed to the most proximate participants and projects, and in the case of the bounty it simply has no directional influence by virtue of the non-prescriptive design.

It's 1AM and it's been a long day - I'll continue this later, I'm sure I missed some points as this was one go. Really appreciate the critical questions, it's a much needed outside perspective to remind us of what needs more elaboration. Hope you found it clarifying to some extent - looking at the wall of text I'll also clean it up later properly!


Q:

Because the North Korean government is so militaristic, the language is very direct and authoritative. South Korean's are more passive in the way they use Korean.

Also, in South Korea they borrow so many English words and it was hard to learn all these new "Korean" words.

A:

That's awesome! Are you ready to propose now? Have you talked about getting married? Have you discussed your plans for the future when it comes to things like career, children, and so on? I NEED MORE INFO.


Q:

i think he needs all the songs he can get himself these days

A:

As soon as he wants to.


Q:

It must be amazing to do for a living what most of my friends do over beers for free.

A:

Any funny stories from the set of Pootie Tang? I have to imagine working so close with Chris, Louis, Wanda, etc.. must have been ridiculous.


Q:

Hello Mr. Titus! What's the most rewarding thing about a career in comedy?

A:

How the fuck did you know that? I've worked at Universal for three years and I have no idea how you got that number. Seems like that was a Google search.


Q:

The nature of Sunni vs Shia is like the Catholic Protestant split 500 years ago. What tends to happen in the middle East is whichever sect tends to be the majority in a given country then tries to dominate the other through bullying, laws, communications, leading to endless cycles of hate and recrimination.

How will your platform prevent secterian brigading given it is so common in the political and social sphere of the middle East? In many areas they still have not advanced to the level of 'live and let live' as Catholicism and protestants have largely done.

A:

What kind of stuff do they teach in North Korean schools about western civilization?


Q:

Thanks! hahah yes we are ready! Our careers are great and we agree on children. We just got a house in the spring. We already have 2 dogs and 3 cats together! Everything is good to go! DFTBA

A:

How's your mom doing? Loved her in the documentary


Q:

How do you think the industry will respond to the Weinstein scandal? Do you feel you behave differently when interviewing male and female guests on WTF?

A:

True! And I also do it over beers for free!


Q:

Crazy ass movie... Wanda was funny as shit!!!

A:

Bitches! Seriously from "Please welcome" To "Thank you goodnight" All the other stuff, travel, hotel beds that 30000 people have slept in and soiled, shitty food. It's all work but the heroin of laughter is the best.


Q:

I asked the orientation leader in my Traditions class because I was curious, and that’s the answer she gave me.

A:

Great question /u/crusoe,

/u/emadm already provided quite some context on this important issue. Perhaps he can provide some more context from his perspective - he's the expert on these issues.

Whilst we cannot change human nature, we can foster unity and understanding - the kind of data we will create will allow people to engage with their beliefs in a manner unhindered by disagreement by others - within certain constraints of course.

The 'objective subjectivity' Emad and the rest of Ananas refer to will allow people see both what binds and distinguished people without the need for an 'all-or-nothing' kind of approach.

One powerful psychological way to go about this is to ensure that the the sects don't interfere with each other - emphasise the important view that there is no single islam, or truth regarding faith for that matter.

The density of religious communities is a catalyst for conflict, it creates friction as they share communities small and large, mosques and resources, which create a form of competition which almost becomes a norm and proxy for identification.

By safeguarding them in a reliable manner, and empowering people to engage safe from harmful forces, all without a need for competition for resources, is in my way one fundamental and powerful manner in which this can reduce conflict.

People tend to see the differences, but rarely is it those differences that actually define them - it just seems that way as people and communities are forced to distinguish their own identity from 'others'. Clarity about their own identity removes the need for excessive territorial protection.


Q:

I did not spend much time in school because of how difficult life was for us. The Great Famine left us without food and we needed to work on the farms instead of going to school. I remember textbooks always portrayed America as a terrible place and Americans as evil. We were told that the South and North could not reunite because America wanted to keep our countries separated to weaken us.

A:

If you're ready, I'm ready. Let's get this done in Cincinnati next week.


Q:

She's doing good thanks

A:

The industry is responding to it. People are speaking out.

Do I talk differently to men than I do to women? Sometimes, but for different reasons.


Q:

It's true! Will and I once met in Chicago and discussed the Marvel family (DC's Captain Marvel/Shazam) over beers.

A:

Outside of Larry, who on the show makes you laugh the most?


Q:

Bitches love heroin.

A:

How aggressively do they update rides/walkways? Like from large scale rides to small details inside the park.


Q:

sure can, you can even earn coins as you interact with the community :)

A:

Thank you so much for doing this. You, and LiNK are wonderful.

What kind of stigmas do you face in South Korea as a North Korean? How difficult is it for you to "come out" as a North Korean?


Q:

Then that settles it, we're all ready. I dont want to interrupt anything during your appearance. If you'll let me do it then, great! When? Maybe during like a Q&A? If there is one.

If you'd rather me not, that's cool too!

A:

What was going through your mind when you decided to crowd-surf with the Foo Fighters the other night?


Q:

Hi Marc, big fan, absolutely loved your work on GLOW! Was there a scene that was your favorite to work on? And, if you were to create your own wrestling personality, who would you be?

A:

For free!


Q:

Funkman!!!! He is amazing!!! Great guy. A lot of great stories too!!

A:

Word.


Q:

It depends on what you mean by "update". The attractions have repairs/renovations done to them at least once a year. Every attraction has an opening checklist to be completed every morning, and a closing checklist to be completed every night. The items on any checklist usually relate to safety and show (everything should look the way it's supposed to). If even one of the items on the opening checklist doesn't pass, the attraction won't open until it's fixed.

A:

Hi /u/unzexpress!

Here's an overview of our platform's basic system. Whenever there is a chance for malice to translate into damage to the environment, Anacoins are necessary, acting as a safety deposit, and as an incentive.

The consumer app will be free, as well as partially the community platform (governance is obviously something we don't want to be unprotected). This means that the fruits of Ananas efforts are not limited by those with Anacoins - because that would defy the whole idea.

Great question, thank you!
~ Marco

edit; on governance


Q:

I face the most discrimination when I apply for jobs in South Korea. When I have an interview, the South Korean employer can usually tell I have a North Korean accent. They will then tell me they do not hire North Koreans and end the interview right then. That happens about 7 out of 10 interviews.

A:

What is your first name and your girlfriend's first name? I will cue you at the appropriate moment. I am not going to tell you in advance what the moment is because that would make it TOO EASY.

THIS IS HAPPENING.


Q:

not a lot tbh

A:

The scene in the abortion clinic and the scene with my daughter were the most challenging and exciting to do as an actor.

My wrestling personality... how about Captain Annoying?


Q:

Wait, wait, wait.

What's the time span between the end of Rogue One and the beginning of ANH? I don't think they specify but I imagine it's anywhere from a few hours to maybe a month or so at most. How does Vader go from "in his prime" to "slow and rusty" in that time frame?

A:

Love your work JB, the combination of Leon and Larry is genius. Have you ever seen Larry get into a real life awkward situation?


Q:

When will backers be getting their rewards? I already laid out $130 for a DVD, I'm not going to spend more money for a streaming version.

A:

If you had a season pass and were forced to spend a year there, how would you plan out your stay as a guest/prisoner at Disney World?


Q:

If you'd like to get involved you're welcome to, there are a few ways.

One can partake in the Anacoin token sale.

One may also join the mailing list for our community platform as we would like people from all walks of the earth and with various perspectives interested in this mission>

And if you'd just like to access this information you can download the app in a few months and have a look whenever you'd like.

Thanks for asking and showing interest.

Zeena

A:

How was your original escape to China orchestrated? Did your family help, and if not, how did you plan it as an 18-year-old with restricted contact with the outside world?

You are incredibly brave and your work now to become a social worker shows your nobility and goodness as well. I wish you and your daughter the best


Q:

Do you think you would still consider writing something outside of the YA bracket? What key aspects of YA keep you writing it?

PS. big fan of 10 years now. I was 15 when I first saw you and Hank on YouTube and have met you guys in Scotland twice. Please visit again sometime!

A:

Liam who do you think would win in a fight; Paul Simon or Phil Collins?


Q:

Hey Marc. Longtime fan. It was great meeting you at the D.C. show in May.

Do you ever worry you will run out of note-worthy guests to interview? And do you have any plans of retiring the show anytime soon, or this something you can see yourself doing well into your 70's?

A:

It doesn't make sense and to my mind, it's a plot and character gap. Basically, logic was sacrificed for the sake of a bad-ass Vader scene at the end of Rogue One. Your mileage may vary over whether it was worth it. Personally, I love that Rogue One scene but it's hard to explain why Vader became so slow and clunky by A New Hope, except perhaps that he was giving Obi-Wan, his old friend and master, an easy ride.


Q:

Yes indeed. Always. Especially at parties. He was the first one to arrive at my big birthday party. Too damn early!!! Hilarious! Then complained that I was late to my own party. SMDH!!!

A:

Listen we never made our goal. But we are we are working on the indiegogo people but FundAnything was backed by Trump and I cant get the records. DVDS will be out near Christmas. "We are on the motherfucker Jules."


Q:

Annual passes only get me entry to the parks, so do I have any money to spend on food/resorts?

A:

If you meant when the platform is out, then I recommend to follow our blog! We're working on a post where we go into detail on collective responsibility and the flexibility our token ecosystem allows in how to contribute and the requirements therefor.

Basically, Ananas will have a place and role for everyone :)


Q:

My step-mother wanted me to marry so I would not be her responsibility anymore. I heard rumors that I could escape to China and be adopted by an older Chinese couple and live a happy life there. My step-mother knew a broker who convinced me to go to China.

The broker guided me to the Tumen river and told me when and where to cross. When I was picked up on the other side the broker told me to pay for my escape or be sold as a bride. I had no money and was terrified of being arrested by the Chinese police. I felt so trapped.

A:

I loved both those trips to Scotland! Hope to be back soon.

I don't know what I'll write in the future. Or if I'll write in the future, for that matter. Writing this book over the last six years was really challenging for me, and I sort of made a deal with myself that I'd take a break once I finished.

As for why I like publishing YA: There are several reasons. One is that I like sharing a shelf with so many writers I admire, from M. T. Anderson to Angie Thomas to Jacqueline Woodson. I love that YA includes scifi AND mystery AND romance AND 'literary fiction' AND everything else.

Another reason is that I like teenage characters and teen readers. Teenagers are doing so many things for the first time--like, they're often falling in love for the first time, but they're also asking the big questions of human existence for the first time as entities separate from their parents. They're thinking about whether there is inherent meaning to human life or whether we have to construct meaning (and what meaning we should construct). They're thinking about the role suffering plays in human life. They're thinking about free will and selfhood and how we establish and confer personhood.

And they're doing it all with unironized emotion and enthusiasm that I find incredibly compelling. Like, I think sincerity is maybe the most underrated feeling of contemporary life. I understand that overly sincere people and sentiments feel cringey to us, but to me sincerity is really lovely, and worth celebrating.

Most of TFIOS's readers are adults, and most of TATWD's probably will be, too. And that's awesome. I want to write books that stand up to critical reading but that also appeal to a broad audience. But I really like being read by teenagers. It's an incredible privilege to have a seat at the table in someone's life when they're asking those big questions for the first time.


Q:

Paul Simon

A:

There's no shortage of interesting people to talk to and there's no end in sight for the show. For humanity, I don't know.


Q:

Vader ‘in his prime at the end of Rogue One’ is the same Vader from A New Hope ;-)

A:

JB, you are the best on Curb!!!

Do you do any writing for the show or just acting? And/or how much of it is improv?


Q:

Always a fan, just want to thank you for coming to South Florida again.

What is one joke that you thought was funny as hell, but every time you told it, never got the reaction you wanted?

A:

You are a prisoner for a year, basic 3 meals a day, you can work to earn extra money but only Disney bucks and at a prisoner rate.


Q:

Hi MetaCitta,

The full technology platform is laid out in overview here: https://medium.com/ananas-blog/the-technology-behind-ananas-fe65c9169058

There are three elements here that contribute to the whole and allow for this platform to (hopefully) be successful.

It needs a streamlined consumer application specific to each data set, A Living Quran, Bible, Vedas or constitution

There is a Data Platform area where the creation, collation and enhancement of resources occurs.

Finally there is a community area where you can interact with members of your own community and others in a safe area, either talking to people at the same level or going down the path to knowledge.

A:

Hello Joy (and Sarah!) This is John From L.A. (I did your hair for the fundraiser last month) I just wanted to ask how can you get your daughter out of China so she can come live with you?


Q:

How's Willy doing?

A:

What's your favourite drink?


Q:

Maron,

What has been your most surreal experience either interviewing someone or on tour? Like an experience that had you wondering, "WTF just happened?"

Thanks in advance, can't wait for my copy of the book to arrive.

A:

I know, but he doesn't seem to fight with the same ability!


Q:

Always appreciation!!

Just acting... with curb though all the dialogue is improvised... so i guess its kinda like writing for your character!!

A:

Every show has one or two of those. Sometime I just let them die and sometime I beat them to death and punish the audience with something I love and they don't get. You gotta save a couple for yourself.


Q:

This would be the coolest thing ever because that means I could spend an entire year in Disney World and do whatever I want without consequences. I’d mess with people so much. Like I’d switch all the dolls in Small World around to all the wrong countries. I’d try to trick character performers into wearing mismatched costumes. I’d figure out how the interactive attractions work (Turtle Talk with Crush, Monsters Inc Laugh Floor) and use those to prank people. Stuff like that. As far as where I live, I’d probably figure out how to set up a permanent camp somewhere in Disney’s Animal Kingdom, since that’s the most I would be able to afford.

A:

I'm going to be really blunt here:

Hell No!

At least not as Facebook communities are now. The current state of information technology and (most) social media are not designed to attenuate socio-psychological phenomena referred to as groupthink - The way group behaviour suffers from problems like polarization and moving towards a mean, and ineffective at making the most valuable contributions or statements visible.

In addition, most communities have inflexible governance/moderation structures, making it often a matter of chance or hopeful trust. I think reddit knows that all too well ;)

~ Marco


Q:

Hi John! Thanks again for the great hair style. I can get my daughter if the man's family will allow me to take her. It will be difficult right now to bring her to South Korea because they want to keep her. I also want to finish university so I can get a job which will allow me to provide for her if she comes to South Korea.

A:

(Willy is my dog.) Willy has cancer, and has for almost a year, but he is doing well. He has a great dog life--we live in a wooded area and Willy has a great time chasing after small woodland creatures and barking at the neighbors.


Q:

alcohol

A:

After the President of the United States left my house, I had that feeling.


Q:

Did Han shoot first?

A:

How exaggerated is Larry's character? Is he at all like that off camera?


Q:

Any chance of you doing a show far up North in Alaska?

A:

How accurate is Swoozie's diaries of an ex disney employee stories on YouTube?


Q:

Hi, thank you for doing this AMA and for trying to help the world. We need people with good intentions like yours.

My question is, how do you separate "fake news" from genuine news in your system? Such terms sound dangerously close to speech control to me - one could easily imagine either side branding news that opposes its agenda as fake, and we've seen that in action so far with the Trump presidency. How is it even possible to make an unbiased judgement on the "fake"ness of news?

A:

Hi. Your story sounds horrific and harrowing. I’m glad you’re okay. I hope your daughter can be delivered to you safely.

What is North Korea like? Is it anything like the news stories we see on the television? Is it better or worse? Are there any myths about North Korea that are spread by the western media? I’m guessing you didn’t like it, hence the defection.
How likely is it you will see your daughter soon, and how will you be able to get her back?
What action can be taken to help stop human sex trafficking? I’d like to help if I can, but I don’t know how much use I’d be.

Thanks in advance, and thank you for doing this AMA. Hope you see your daughter soon. :)


Q:

You're John Green, author of The Fault in Our Stars and Turtles All the Way Down. Why are you on a bus for the next eight hours? You could have taken a plane!

A:

Hey LG I just really want to know what song do you usually sing in the shower? x


Q:

follow-up to that: will you invite mr trump for a sequel?

A:

Yes. He shot first in that he literally shot first in the original version of the film.

Also, however much they revise the films, my personal headcanon would always insist that he shot first, because it makes sense in terms of his character arc.

If Han was always a great guy who fights fair and only uses his weapon in retaliation, it wouldn't make sense for him to soften by ROTJ. The whole point is that when we meet him in ANH, he only looks out for himself and his co-pilot, and only cares about money and his own survival.


Q:

He's not that bad but interesting dude.

A:

Once Trump acknowledges Alaska is part of the US I will perform there.


Q:

Mostly accurate. Keep in mind, he’s a storyteller, so a lot of what he says is exaggerated since it makes for a better story.

A:

Thanks for the kind words /u/stoveeee ! Really enjoying this AMA, enormously happy with the great questions!

So what is "fake" news actually? As a phenomenon, it is more than a denouncement of the legitimacy of other sources of informations more than a phenomenon of news itself.

It's basically the phenomenon of entities of influence or authority realising how stupidly effective it is to throw shit at others and judge them as bullshit.

We're not doing speech control. We're giving people the tools and means to discern it themselves.

For example if someone questions the validity or reliability of some news or content, they can collate it into the Ananas system, and collectively build a context around it and basically crowd-source fact checking.

This sounds like a hassle - and initially it might be. But this process of contextualisation, verification of statements, will be increasingly augmented with AI - natural language processing, semantic analysis, conceptual modelling - and minimizing the dependency on human effort (and exposure to both individual and collective human error)

It's not about making unbiased and perfect news. It's about empowering people to not be sensitive to its effects, in turn removing the very factors that have allowed it to thrive - the fact that it's so effective . Empowering people not to be swayed by these institutional forces is in my personal opinion a collective mission most dire of our age.


Q:

Good questions! There is so much focus in the western media about North Korea's military and nuclear weapons. There is rarely any stories about average North Koreans, especially those that live outside the capital Pyongyang. Most North Koreans are ordinary people that want to live peaceful lives but the media makes it look like every North Korean wants to destroy America or South Korea.

Everything in the underground broker networks revolves around money. North Korean women that cannot afford to cross the border are told it is free to cross and then when they cannot pay on the other side they are sold instead. That was my experience. If you want to get involved in helping North Korean women avoid sex trafficking you should fund rescues through organizations like LiNK. The safest way a woman can avoid being trafficked is to have her rescue paid for before she leaves the country. Then when she crosses she can enter a safe network that can move her out of China before she is exploited.

A:

I could've, but it would not have been as fun or as comfortable. Here's my reasoning:

  1. Early in my career, I missed three very important events because of canceled or delayed flights. I understand of course that road traffic can also be a problem, and all kinds of unfortunate things might befall anyone at any time, but so far I have never missed an event while driving from place to place.

  2. When you take 19 airplane flights in 19 days, you spend a lot of time in airports. I like airports, but they're public(ish) spaces, so you can't totally relax in them. (Or I can't, anyway.) The bus is (so far anyway) super relaxing.

  3. There is no Super Nintendo on airplanes.

  4. I've always liked road trips. Some critics of my books might argue that I like them a bit too much.


Q:

the birdie song

A:

I won't invite, but if he requests it and wants to play on the same terms as President Obama, sure.


Q:

If you could change one thing about Blade Runner to improve upon it as a film, what would it be?

A:

Hi. What has your experience been like working with Larry David?


Q:

Titus given how everythign turned out with your ex-wife, do you l ever watch the old show and think god was I naieve?

Also given how many issues of yourwith your ex-wife mirror wat happened between your father and your mother, did that give you empathy and a closer relationship with your father? Did he see it coming and help you through it or just let you figure it out.

BTW. I loved your show. I wish there cold be a miniseries intersplicing clips of your old show with you talkign to yourself knowing what you know now.

A:

My sister worked for the mouse and was treated horribly, especially when it came to housing where she was living with 4 people in a 2 bedroom apartment, how was your experience?


Q:

Thank you for doing an AMA. I lived in South Korea for a while, and when I would talk to the locals, they all held an opinion not of disdain for North Korea, but more like regret. They seem to all wish very much for a peaceful reunification of the two nations.

My question is this: all the news of North Korea is almost inconceivably dreadful. While I'm sure there is much misery in the country, can you tell us a story of a time when you or your family were genuinely happy? What sort of things bring joy to the average North Korean?

A:

how many turtles does it take to make it all the way down?


Q:

I grew up on Manc council estate in the 90's... Oasis was very much the soundtrack to my childhood!

Putting music & football to one side, what do you miss most about Manchester?

Good work on the album btw Liam, you absolutely fuckin smashed it!

A:

hey marc how are your cats? i hope theyre good


Q:

OK I answered your question, then realised you were asking about the original Blade Runner... sorry!

I reply below about BR2049, then I'll answer the question properly.

At the time, I thought it should have been cut down a little, and that it was too long. Now, on reflection, I think perhaps it needed that length as it's such an immersive, slow-moving, thoughtful and complex epic.

One thing I still don't love about it is the scene where the rebel replicants step out of the shadow on cue. I think the replicant army seems a little too neat, almost cliched, and perhaps they could have been reduced to just a small bunch of resistant Nexus 8, with a few newer models.

The fact that Luv leaves K in Vegas, rather than making sure he's dead or bringing him back to Wallace, also seems a bit too much of a convenient plot hole.

There are other points I don't fully understand about the movie, but I think it's fine if some of it is ambiguous and mysterious, as was the case with the original.

So, overall I was least fond of the sudden appearance of a bad-ass replicant rebellion group towards the end of the movie.

OK, the original Blade Runner.

This is one movie that I often say is my favourite -- it is hard to pick favourites but that's the one I offer, when I am asked. So I'm so fond of it, I would be reluctant to change anything.

One thing I wouldn't mind seeing added to the original Blade Runner is the scene that was shot then cut, where Deckard visits Holden in hospital.

I think it would be fair to add in something that was part of the original movie, and see how that works.

I don't think I would want to risk changing Blade Runner as while it isn't perfect, its imperfections are what make it so interesting.

A:

Amazing guy since we me at the audition!!!! I talk a lot of shit to him. He loves it!!!


Q:

No, I knew at the time but I was always trying to placate her. I've learned now that life is to short to be with a Life Vampire. My life has paralleled my Dad's in a bunch of ways. My kids even did the same thing to me I did to him. Great idea for a show. If I could tell myself what I know know when I was 12, I would be John Titor.

A:

I had an amazing experience. Everyone seems to have a different experience when they come to work for Disney. It all depends on your perspective I guess. My experience with housing was pretty great, and I'm actually still friends with most of my roommates. I lived in two different apartment during my time there: the first was a 1 bedroom 3 person in Chatham Square, the next was also a 1 bedroom 3 person in Patterson Court. Which complex did your sister live in?


Q:

My fondest memories from North Korea revolve around my family. Everyday when my mom would come home she would give me a big hug and I loved that. I also have great memories of family talent shows where we would sign karaoke late into the night!

A:

It takes more than all of the turtles.


Q:

My mam

A:

All good.


Q:

Same here. I would compare it to the original movie where Roy would go from being stoic tough guy to having an expression of pure sadness on the verge of crying. They may physically be adults but emotionally they're children.

A:

JB,
What was the hardest line in Curb to deliver with a straight face? Your delivery is hysterical. Cheers!


Q:

Chris, big fan since the TV show. I frequently use the line "Dune Buggggieesss" and get blank stares from my friends.

I know you had said there were talks of a Titus 2.0 a few years back, are those talks over or still on the back burner?

A:

Not sure, but the whole complex got covered in black mold and they refused to pay for hotel rooms while the rooms were being cleared and then refused to pay for the medical bills for the lung problems the mold caused.


Q:

Joy, thanks so much for sharing your experiences, and thanks Ian and Sarah for being a part of such a great organization.

How has your experience in New York City been so far? How does it compare to the culture in which you were raised?

A:

Hi John,

I met you at a meet up in Rotterdam, when you where finishing TFIOS and living in Amsterdam. I knew you from Vlogbrothers and I hastily bought a book to get me an autograph. I've since read them all and love them.

Question: Will you please reveal the secret writing spot in Amsterdam you talked about? The one where one other nerdfighter found you, but kept it secret. Or did you reveal this already?

Thanks!


Q:

Are you enjoying the creative freedom of being on your own as opposed to being in a band?

A:

Best advise you’ve ever gotten? Worst advise you’ve ever gotten?


Q:

Yes, they've technically been born as adults, but they haven't had long to develop social skills, and they mainly seem to mix with other replicants rather than with humans (partly because of anti-replicant prejudice). The Shoulder of Orion podcast u/bladerunnerpodcast made a good point about this recently.

A:

When I know Larry doesn't know what the hell I'm talking about!! That dude never heard of "Get in that Ass' in his life!!! Funniest face the first take Ive ever seen!!


Q:

FOX flat out said we couldn't use any of the characters or names. FOX owns my family now. I miss them.

A:

That's awful. Yea I've heard a few horror stories like that from friends of mine.


Q:

I am happy to share :)

New York City is so bright at night! There are so many lights! The buildings are so tall here. I also love the diversity here, there are people from all over the world on every street. In North Korea I never saw someone from another country.

A:

It was the top floor of Amsterdam's Central Library. Sarah and I went there to work each day during our months in Amsterdam, and I rewrote most of The Fault in Our Stars there. Still my favorite library!


Q:

not particularly. i loved being in a band.

A:

Best advice was when I asked Paul Reiser, "How do you get started in comedy?" I asked him that when I was in college. He said, "Well. You've just got to do it."

Worst advice was "Cocaine will help."


Q:

I'd probably change the rapey scene with ford to maybe get the point across better. Looking at it now you tend to lose all the respect for the character, not that he deserves much but it breaks the immersion for me.

A:

Hey, JB! What’s the best curveball you’ve thrown at Larry and/or another cast member while improving and vice versa? Also, how do you keep yourself from laughing? Any tricks? Great job, as always, this season!


Q:

Hi Chris! I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you for your show, I really loved it! I know it pushed a lot of limits in regards of black comedy back in the day, but the way the TV has evolved made me hopeful that some day we could have a fourth season. That being said, what is your best memory from those days? Is it true that you got intimidated by Stacy Keach?

A:

Did you serve alcohol there? Follow up, any funny stories of drunk parents and their embarrassed kids?


Q:

I've seen photos of average people in N. Korea. Only the children seem to ever smile. Is this cultural? Or us it due to the awful life adults must face each day?

A:

I'm a social studies teacher and I use your Crash Course videos all the time. I know you've got like a dozen different Crash Course series going on right now. So my questions are:

  • How involved are you in the Crash Course program now? Are you mostly handing them off to other experts to design and host?

  • Are there any plans to bring back the defunct Crash Course Geography series? (Props, by the way, for owning up to the first episode's flaws and pulling the series.)

  • Do you have plans to extend any more of your series like you did with the second season of World History?


Q:

Liam, is Robbie Williams was a type of beer, what would that beer be? As you were lad

A:

Hi Marc,

do you find that interviewing musicians helps with your own guitar playing, and do you ever ask for pointers from your guests, or do you just leave them to it? Also; what sort of guitars are you playing these days, any new gear to talk about?

Thanks for the podcast and for doing this AMA!


Q:

Actually, yeah. That is a great choice! I would go for that instead. It's a weird and disturbing scene, and it makes it harder (for me) to believe that they had any kind of equal, healthy loving relationship afterwards. Rachael seems to be simply repeating what Deckard tells her to say, as if he's programming her.

On the other hand, it is an important part of the original, however uneasy it might make us feel as viewers. I agree, it makes it harder to sympathise with Deckard, in 2019 and in 2049.

A:

I try and give Larry something new he didn't know about Leon every time we shoot. Gotta be the first episode this season when I slipped in that I did a porno constipated!!!


Q:

At the audition Stacy was SOOO good. We finished the Audition and after Stacy left Jack and Brian (Other exec producers) said "What do you think?" I replied " He scares the shit out of me!" They said "He's the guy" In the final audition with the network we had to fight for Stacy because they thought he was "Too Real" WTF?

A:

Duh. Actually, I worked in EPCOT, which most Disney cast members have nicknamed "the drunk park". EPCOT houses the world showcase (alcohol from every corner of the world, pretty much), and hosts the annual International Food & Wine Festival. I had to deal with drunk guests on a daily basis, and I have two pretty funny stories pertaining to drunk guests:

  1. I worked at a restaurant called the Electric Umbrella in EPCOT. One day, I was working at the counter, and a middle aged man came up and bought a can of bud light. I opened one and handed it too him, and he chugged the entire thing in front of me, then handed it back and asked me to throw it out. A few minutes later, he came back and did the same thing. This happened two more times, then about 30 minutes later, I looked across the restaurant and saw his wife (I assume) yelling at him in front of their kids.

  2. An extremely inebriated guest was trying to find Test Track. I spent 15 minutes (I counted) trying to explain to him that the ride he was looking for was right behind him.


Q:

It is not cultural, I think young North Korean children are not really aware how difficult life is. But I know plenty of adults that smile too!

A:

Thanks so much for using Crash Course (and for teaching). It's great to hear that it's a useful tool for your students.

How involved are you in the Crash Course program now? Are you mostly handing them off to other experts to design and host?

I am involved in the same way I was always involved, which is mostly in helping decide what we cover, overseeing projects, and some hosting. (There's a new literature series hosted by me that will start up next month.) They were always mostly written and designed by people other than us, and that's still the case. The channel is definitely DEEPLY dependent upon the brilliant team of people who work on the channel.

Are there any plans to bring back the defunct Crash Course Geography series? (Props, by the way, for owning up to the first episode's flaws and pulling the series.)

There are plans, but not for 2018, because I think we've set the upload schedule for next year. As we learned, it's an extremely challenging topic, and we don't feel like we've cracked it yet with the right writer, curriculum consultant, and Crash Course producer combination yet.

Do you have plans to extend any more of your series like you did with the second season of World History?

I think we'll continue to do 10-12 episode of literature videos per year, and we are looking toward doing more "seasons" approaches, but if we go back to World History, it probably won't be hosted by me. I think it's important to get new voices and perspectives in that conversation.


Q:

Bud Light

A:

Yeah, I definitely ask for pointers and they usually give them to me. Every time I do the Conan O'Brien show, Jimmy Vivino shows me some new licks.

I've been playing a Gibson reissue of a '56 Les Paul Deluxe Gold Top.


Q:

What is your opinion of so much of The Star Wars EU getting removed from Canon status? Also, what now non canonical story do you wish was still Canon?

A:

"Look, I'm-a hum, I'm-a catch it in my hand and I throw this ommm in your mouth. OPEN YO MOUF!!!!"


Q:

what would you say has been your best and worst fan interactions?

A:

Worst customer experience?


Q:

How's your diet compare to what you ate in North Korea? and do you plan to stay in South Korea or do you plan to go somewhere else? I hear Canada is nice.

A:

When you and your wife were deciding to have children did you ever worry about how your mental illness may affect them and whether or not they would inherit it from you?

Both my SO and I struggle with depression and anxiety and I always worry about passing that on to future children.


Q:

There’s a short recording from 2004 of you singing a song called “Show Me Your Love”. It’s fucking great man. Are you ever going to give it a proper release? Here is a link to it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7xPTUJzKqk

A:

Hello Marc

If you could give any piece of advice not relating to your profession, what would it be?


Q:

I'm generally against the erasure and suppression of stories. I feel the same way about the way DC Comics decides some stories 'didn't happen' and are written out of history.

I was never a huge EU reader, but I can entirely understand the way fans might feel betrayed by that decision, even though I also think the EU had a lot of variable quality. I don't personally feel every character needed a backstory, and I never felt driven to read the stories set in the far future or the distant past. So perhaps for me, the EU became too 'Extended', but that's just my own preference.

Personally, I loved the Zahn trilogy, and Shadows of the Empire. They offered me quality Star Wars content in the long years between any official movies. If they could find a way of adapting a version of Shadows of the Empire into a movie that took place between episodes V and VI, I think that would be pretty interesting.

I understand that Thrawn is now entering back into canon though, so it seems everything is open to change.

A:

Getting close!!!


Q:

My people are usually thinkers. I don't know why. They have usually been through some shit in their life and are always cool. I did get attacked once in Austin but that was because a dude heckled because his girl was into the show. They had to break us up in the Merch line.

A:

A woman called me racist and screamed at me for 10 minutes because I told her she had to wait in line to buy food.


Q:

The food in North Korea is similar to South Korean food. The food is spicier and saltier in the North.

Unless there is a reason for me to stay in South Korea, I am open to living anywhere after I finish university. I like South Korea but don't feel the need to stay.

A:

Yes, I worried (and worry) about both how my illness might affect them and about their increased risk of mental illness.

But I also worried (and worry) about lots of other things--whether they'll be at increased risk for other chronic illnesses because of our genetics, whether our public lives with negatively impact their lives, et cetera. Every parent brings their own set of strengths and challenges to parenting.

For me, the decision in the end was helped by the fact that I really believe that it is possible for someone to have a chronic mental illness and also live a fulfilling life.

Of course it can be challenging to meet your kids' needs when you're sick--but that's true for anyone with a chronic health problem.

All that said, whether to have kids is a deeply personal decision, and I don't think my decision would necessarily be right for you or anyone else.


Q:

forgot all about that, thanks for reminding me though

A:

Decide whether or not being hard on yourself is proactive or completely undermining.


Q:

if you were put on an island with 5 games of your choice (and the ability to run them) what would they be?

Also, what cut of Blade Runner would you recommend to people?

P.S - Hey from a fellow UEA alumni

A:

My question is 'What da fuck is goin on, Larry?'


Q:

Hey Titus, I've been a huge fan of yours for years. I love your stand-up shows, love the podcast (shoutout to Fetus). I'm 21 years old and when I was 18 I went through pretty heavy depression that lasted until I was 20. And days when I was at my worst I would watch your stand-up on YouTube and listen to your podcast and hearing you talk about your family and your own mental issues, it gave me comfort and made me laugh when nothing else could. So I want to say thank you, from the bottom of my heart. You are the best. As for my question, what's the best advice you could give a young guy like me?

A:

Don’t you think by identifying her race as if it is some qualifier makes it kinda seem like you judge people by their race?

Edit: keep up the downvotes, assholes. Don’t give a fuck and if I wasn’t right he wouldn’t have edited his post.


Q:

Come to Canada!!!! We will accept you with open arms :)

A:

Hi John! (And Hank too!) Congratulations on the new book, I can't wait to read it once I've finished my final university exams in a couple of weeks.

Firstly I just want to say thank you for being so awesome and for all the great things that you have done over the years, you make me proud to be a nerdfighter.

What do you find the most challenging part of writing a book?

Made you look, Brooke


Q:

If you could open for one band, who would it be?

A:

Hey Marc, love to hear you talk with musicians, what have you been listening to lately?


Q:

hi, fellow alumnus!

I am proud to say I completed two relatively new video games this year, GTAV and Bioshock Infinite -- which is a lot, for me, as I don't have a lot of spare time to commit to long stories and immersive worlds.

Most of my gaming took place in the 1980s.

I would probably take GTA V, and San Andreas, my 1990s favourite Wing Commander Privateer, the 1980s ZX Spectrum classic Jetpac, and one of the Batman: Arkham games that I haven't played, as I would have time to commit to it and really get into it.

A:

LOL!!! Love it!!


Q:

Know that it's all made up. What happened, happened. How you see it will transform your life. My Dad was an abusive alcoholic, OR he was single father who did his best in an impossible circumstance. Up to you to decide how you see it. Even if it's not true shitty things can give you power if you choose to see them like that. You can also ride the vengeance and that is fuel too. I took the Landmark Forum, changed the way I saw everything. I know I've talked about it a lot but it really made a difference in my life. Best Advice: TAKE THE FORUM

A:

You’re right. I fixed it.


Q:

Canadians always seem to be so nice!

A:

Great name-specific sign-off, Brooke.

There's always a point, usually 20,000 to 30,000 words into a new story, where I realize it's bad. Like, really bad. And often when I get to that point, I have to abandon the story--which is a bummer, because I've spent three or six or twenty months on it, and then I feel like, this was all for nothing! I have wasted all this time!

But then sometimes I will get to that point of realizing the story is terrible, and I'll think, "You know, I think I can plow through to an end here. I think I've at least got some idea about the characters." And then I make it to the end of the draft a few months later. I'll still have to delete most of that draft in revision, and rewrite and rewrite and rewrite and rewrite before I have a book, but if I make it past that point where I realize it's all bad, I can finish.

And then eventually I will understand that none of the time spent was actually wasted, because I had to puzzle through those stories that couldn't work to get to the one that could.

So for me the hardest part is accepting when something isn't working, and letting it go, and starting again.


Q:

Rolling Stones

A:

I've been listening to Night of the Cookers. It's Freddie Hubbard and Lee Morgan, live.


Q:

Ooh, what are your thoughts on Bioshock Infinite? Mind blowing, or inter-dimensional kitsch?

A:

We've all seen LD on screen but what's real life Larry like? He always seems to be playing a character in his shows and movies but what's he actually like - in the most raw, personal way?


Q:

Are there any plans for a Killer Klowns From Outer Space sequel?

A:

I've had sex at Disneyland as a guest, and expect it would be easier for an employee. As a cast member, how many escapades were you able to get away with?


Q:

Do you expect to see the current regime in North Korea fall within your lifetime?

A:

you mentioned several times pre-release how nervous you were about all of us reading Turtles. How are you feeling now?


Q:

Hey Liam, big fan here. Simple question, other than football, what's your favorite sport?

A:

Have you considered going to England to do interviews? I would like to hear Charlie Brooker, Richard Ayoade, Graham Linehan, the Pythons, the League of Gentlemen guys, the Mighty Boosh guys, etc.

Also, why don't you do the live WTF shows anymore?


Q:

I really loved it. I had watched the whole story on YouTube playthroughs previously, but it still affected me to experience the twists personally, within the game.

I know it has serious flaws, like the fact that it feels like walking around a museum rather than a living, breathing world, but the design is fantastic, and even if we can find plot holes in the time-travel narrative, I still think it's really clever.

I admire its ambition, even if it doesn't come off 100%, and I have no problem with the fact that it's mainly about shooting people in a pretty city.

One thing I would have changed about it is the ability to carry more than one weapon.

A:

Very nice guy... although I wouldn't recommend rolling up on him for a hug!!


Q:

I've been hearing about it for years but i died in that movie... so fuck em.

A:

The attractions all have cameras on them, so I assure you, some cast member saw everything you did. I actually never had sex in the parks, but I've heard some hilarious stories.


Q:

I am not sure. If I am lucky, I have another 60 years of life so maybe by the end of my life I will have the chance to go back to see my hometown.

A:

Mostly just very relieved, to be honest.

Publishing this book was very different from any of my previous experiences. There were almost no reviews until the day of publication, and the publisher was (understandably) very worried about leaks, so only a few people had even read it before maybe a week ago.

So I just didn't know what people would think of it. I don't think I realized how worried I was until Tuesday morning when I read the New York Times review and just started sobbing.

Of course, I understand that not everyone will like the book, and also that's okay! But it was a huge relief to know that early reviewers did.


Q:

boxing

A:

I did it early on with Stewart Lee, Tim Key, Harry Deansway, Adam Bloom. I'd do it again.

The live shows are a big undertaking and were done initially as premium content. They don't really honor what we do anymore, though they are entertaining.


Q:

Have you thought about doing a YouTube series covering similar topics? I love reading about stuff like this but it's hard to share with friends.

A:

hey man love your work bro what would you say the possibility is of you getting a spin off?


Q:

First off I wanted to say thank you for all of your standup specials. I travel a ton and they have brought me many hours of enjoyment as I drive through some of the less desirable portions of the country.

My question for you is this. Have you had any potential material for a show that has been vetoed by your wife or family/friends? You share a tremendous amount from your life, good and bad, but was just curious if you came up with something that your wife went "nope, you aren't telling that one".

A:

Is it hard to work at disney and go through the internship?


Q:

I have interviewed many North Koreans now settled in the UK. Many of them told me they had been caught by the Chinese police and repatriated to the north a number of times, but managed to escape again and again.

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/north-korea-nuclear-weapons-refugees-china-women-prostitution-sold-a7982356.html

Can you explain why they didn't face harsh consequences for escaping in North Korea?

A:

What opinion of yours has changed the most for the past 10 years?


Q:

What’s Alan White up to these days? Do you ever speak to him?

A:

Hey Marc, huge fan of the podcast and your standup.

What's your least favorite city to perform when you're on a standup tour?


Q:

That's a big compliment, thank you, but I just don't think I would have the time for it! If some media company wanted to pay me for it, and organise the production, I would seriously consider it, but I take on a lot of projects at once, as it is, and there is a limit to what I can do without doing some of them badly.

A:

How amazing would that be... only thing is there is a certain energy and chemistry that Larry and I have on set that cant be matched. Maybe it is what it is. Still would be fun to cross that bridge.


Q:

I think the next one is called " Stories, I shouldn't tell" It should really isolate me. But I'll get all my holidays free.

A:

Yes.


Q:

Ian here: It all depends on where they were caught and the circumstances around their arrest in China. If they are caught close to the border with China, it is easier to convince the North Korean authorities that they were in China for economic reasons and intended to come back. If they are caught closer to the border with Southeast Asia it is obvious they were trying to defect and that can carry much harsher consequences. If it is discovered that a North Korean had contact with a South Korean or Christians anywhere in China, that can also increase the chances of facing much harsher punishments. The North Korean government is also incredibly corrupt and bribes from family members to local officials can have an impact on one's sentencing.

A:

I used to think the Internet was an unambiguous force for good.


Q:

not seen Whitey for ages. I'm sure he's buying and selling things

A:

City of Florida


Q:

I have a Star Wars YouTube channel, you're welcome to make an appearance! I'd edit and produce the content! Money comes from ad revenue.

https://www.YouTube.com/Eckhartsladder

A:

Hey JB, thanks for doing this. What's the most common quote people like to yell at you when you get recognized? How often do you do stand up sets? Can you come to Tampa Improv soon?


Q:

The only question I have is, how's Foxy doing?

A:

What is Quick Service Food & Beverage?


Q:

What is a funeral ceremony like in North Korea for the average citizen?

A:

What's your stance on Chewbacca's personhood?


Q:

What moment from your career are you proudest of?

A:

Hi Marc, I read the Denial of Death after your recommendation and it was great. What other seminal books would you recommend everyone reads in order to understand themselves and life in general?

p.s. Boomer Lives!


Q:

I did a Skype interview for a podcast this week, so I'm happy to do another interview sometime if you want to feature me.

A:

Most common is Thats how I Doozit, Get in that Ass and Bring the Ruckus!!

Always on the road. Tampa soon.


Q:

If you are talking about Bombshell her chick pimp name is "Bootsy Badde."

A:

It’s basically the Disney World version of fast food. So any restaurant that doesn’t have waitstaff, or any of the food carts outside.


Q:

Where I lived people were buried after three days in a small coffin. No one I knew was ever cremated. I once heard about a North Korean grandmother who was scheduled to be buried but woke up and scared everyone in the village when they realized she was still alive!

A:

Chewbacca is a person.


Q:

This is my proudest moment in my musical journey

A:

The Big Book


Q:

Do you like Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Do you wish more of it was incorporated into the movies?

A:

What has been the most challenging scene in curb for you to film? And by challenging it can be whatever be it struggling not to laugh or struggling for the right jokes in the moment


Q:

Is the reason you and RaeRae are not doing stand up in Canada is because you are worried that if you leave the US, Trump won't allow you back in?

A:

I just want to say how amazing it is you have been able to overcome such obstacles! Please continue to strive and move forward! I am sorry for what has happened to you, and the obstacles you have had to face. I hope you have a content and hopeful future! Also, my question is. How old are you?


Q:

What's your stance on the personhood of C3P0! (or is it C3PO?)

A:

Hi Liam, The new album rocks, thanks! Can’t believe ‘Come Back to Me’ wasn’t a single, what a nice surprise! If you could have been a fly on the wall for one moment in history – which moment would it be?


Q:

Marc and Brendan,

Thanks for the countless hours of entertainment over the years. I have to drive about 3 hours round trip a day for work, so you've definitely kept me sane during those mind numbing drives. I find myself going back and re-listening to a lot of your podcasts. I do this a lot with guests who I was not familiar with beforehand. So I was wondering, who is a guest that you weren't very familiar with, or was unsure of that really surprised you during your interview?

Thanks!

A:

I do like it, though I think like a lot of PKD's work, it reads like it was written on speed (which I think is the case). It is full of amazing ideas, but as a coherent story with characters and plot, I think it's technically a bit fragmented and frustrating.

As I remember, the Westwood Blade Runner game incorporated a little more of the novel's ideas (think it mentions kipple?) and the K W Jeter novels, particularly the first sequel The Edge of Human, tried to make sense of the differences between Blade Runner and DADoES, such as how J F Sebastian relates to John Isidore.

I think it would be a nice tribute if BR2049 had tried to incorporate more from Dick's novel, but then again, the BR film universe is its own self-contained world now, distinct from our own future, and also arguably distinct from the world that Dick created. If they could have done it in a way that fitted, and didn't seem like a throwaway Easter Egg that disrupted the story-world, I think it would have been a nice touch.


Q:

Oh Snap!! Sometimes I go too hard. Leon is a outspoken character. I don't ever want him to come off the wrong way and I always want his views to differ for Larry's but still be funny! So I guess its always a challenge.

A:

Or he might bomb Canada because your President is so much cooler.


Q:

Thank you so much for those kind words. I am now 25! My birthday is soon :)

A:

I do not think droids are people. Not even BB8.


Q:

the moment john lennon went up in a helicopter with the maharishi

A:

Huey Lewis, RuPaul, Paul Scheer.


Q:

You didn't notice thematic throwbacks and tiny easter eggs based on the novel in 2049? DADoES is very much about deciding what is real and if knowing is even worth it, something the original BR film never really focused on. 2049, however, embarks openly and primarily upon those themes. The main character has to question his own reality and the reality of his relationship with every single other character in the film.

We even get Deckard not wanting to know if his pet is real or not.

A:

JB! As someone who discovered you on Curb but just found out you were on Def Comedy Jam. Do you have any real x rated stories form back in those days?


Q:

We don't hav- Okay, funny!!! LOL

A:

If you get your daughter back from china and the Chinese authorities catch you, isn't there a chance that they WILL hand you over back to North Korea?


Q:

How would you describe your relationship between your OCD/mental illness and your writing?

A:

What do you want for Christmas?


Q:

How did you decide on the common threads to pull together from the interviews, and how difficult was it to condense? Was permission from anyone an issue, or do you already have the rights to the whole interview?

Thanks again, you were the first podcast I listened to before I went down the podcasting rabbit hole, and your interviews have meant a lot to me! (Also great episode on the Turnaround and Lovett or Leave It).

A:

Thematic throwbacks, certainly, but I didn't really notice tiny Easter Eggs. Of course, the themes throughout the Blade Runner movies are indebted to DADoEs. I'm afraid I haven't read the novel for a while. That's why comments like yours are useful.


Q:

None that i can tell you online... those guys are still friends.

A:

Prime Minister, which is a great wrestler name.


Q:

I am now a South Korean citizen! That means that when I go to China I am there on a visa and they have no reason to arrest me. It will be hard to get my daughter back without the permission of the family who bought me. If I just try to take her back it would be considered kidnapping by the Chinese government.

A:

I wanted to write this story in part because I have not found that OCD brings me, like, secret super powers. Obsessiveness has not increased my powers of deduction, like you see in Sherlock Holmes or the TV show Monk.

I wanted to write about a detective whose mental illness is, like, massively unhelpful to the investigation. And although I know people often associate mental illness and creative writing, I have found my mental illness to be massively unhelpful to my writing. When I am really sick, I can't write anything. At times, I can't even read a menu.

I write best when I'm well, and while this book is about the experience of losing control over one's thoughts, almost all of it was written while I was in a period of good health.


Q:

a splash of Tourettes you f*cking cunt

A:

BM: The threads came together after re-listening to everything and pulling out the good stories. Then it was assembled like a puzzle and the themes became obvious.

Two people requested their material not be used.


Q:

I thought the sheep origami was a reference

A:

How important was Def Comedy Jam to you and your contemporaries?


Q:

Huge fan. Any idea if and when you may be coming back to Des Moines? Also, will there be a hard copy release of Special Unit?

A:

Is North Korea really as bad as the media portrays it? Is it better? Is it worse?


Q:

What's Pizza John's favorite pizza topping?

A:

Hi Liam, Love the new album. I bought it on vinyl but unfortunately couldn't get tickets to see you.

Anyway, my question is after the immediate success of As You Were, will you still be making your own tea?


Q:

If not their names, could you share their reasons?

A:

Yes, you're right.


Q:

Very important. It was a amazing time for comedy as well as the edgy raw comedy and no one was excluded. Funny is funny!!

A:

No and Yes


Q:

It is much worse than the way media portrays it. They are so focused on the military and showing scenes of Pyongyang when average North Koreans are really struggling to survive. I wish they would show how normal North Koreans who are trying to live normal lives despite the cruelness of the regime.

A:

I'm not picky when it comes to toppings. I just want to eat pizza.

Just, like, don't do anything weird with it, okay? Don't try to tell me that this unrolled burrito is a pizza, or that this turkey sandwich on pizza dough is a pizza. I just want to eat pizza. Regular pizza and lots of it.


Q:

God no..

A:

BM: One person did not want the material to be used outside of a one-man show starring Billy Crystal.

The other person had a lot of lawyers and managers who did not think it was best for Donald Glover to participate at this time.


Q:

What do you think about Luke, Han and Leia handling in The Force Awakening movie?

A:

What is your favorite restaurant in the Los Angeles area to eat with Larry David?


Q:

Hi Titus,

I am excited to watch Special Unit! Thank you for using actors with diabilites! (I have mild CP) What was the spark that lead to you writing your unsual but greatly needed script?

A:

How many people would you say actually believe all the propaganda by the government, how many think Kim Il Sung is a God?


Q:

What's your stance on pineapple?

A:

What’s it going to say on your tombstone?


Q:

Huge fan, you honestly inspired me to start standup at my local open mics and while I'm not good still it's some of the best times.

Would you ever be willing to star in another Marc themed tv/Netflix show? I love Glow but it doesn't quite fit the same roll Maron filled in my heart.

A:

I'm glad they were included. The Han Solo scenes in TFA were what I connected with most, as a fan who first saw Star Wars in 1977. They were the heart of the movie for me, and I liked the bittersweet sense of nostalgia and melancholy around Han and Leia -- the sense of history, and of mistakes made, and passing the torch down to the next generation.

I found it shocking and upsetting when Han died, but in plot terms, I can certainly see the reasons for it, and I doubt that Ford would have wanted to stay on for three movies.

From what I've seen so far, Mark Hamill is going to give the performance of his life as Luke, just as (I think) Harrison Ford did in Blade Runner 2049. He has matured so much as an actor, and it looks as if he's really enjoying the role.

Leia, obviously, has to leave the saga in the next movie, and I expect they'll be sure to do her, and Carrie Fisher, justice. I imagine her last scene will be very emotional.


Q:

I Love Craig's on Melrose ave.

A:

My buddy Mike Aronin. I saw how people treated him all the time. Either they treat him like a toddler or ignored him. I wanted it to be balls out funny and show people that the disability is the last thing Mike was. It was just something he lives with like my oddly shaped left testicle. There you go reddit.


Q:

Most people that live by the Chinese border know that the propaganda is fake. They have a lot of exposure to foreign media that is smuggled in through China. The people that believe the propaganda usually live in secluded areas with little access to outside media.

A:

Look, I just published a book two days ago. I'm not looking to be super-divisive right now. The last thing I need is pro-pineapple or anti-pineapple people boycotting my book. So I'm just going to say that how you eat your pizza is your business, and how I eat my pizza is with no goddamned pineapple.


Q:

AS YOU WERE

A:

Yeah, I'm open.


Q:

Do you expect the new Star Wars movies to actually fill in any background on the Knights of Ren or Snoke? Looking back, the original trilogy gave very little insight on the Sith or Darth Sidious. The word Sith was never even used if I remember correctly.

A:

Huge Curb fan! JB what is your favorite episode that you wish you could have made an appearance in?


Q:

Is he the one who tormented the waitress? That is still one of my favorite stories.

She DID deserve it.

A:

1- What do you think about tourism companies offering trips to North Korea and the people that go on those trips? Do you think that it's just money that goes to the regime or that it helps in some way the locals?

2- Do you still have family in NK? If so, are you considering getting them out?

3- Have you met Yeonmi Park and Hyeonseo Lee? Do you relate to their stories?

4- Are you considering writing a memoir?

5- What city did you live in in NK? Did you ever have some kind of romantic relationship or held hands with someone?


Q:

Hi John,

Often in your vlogbrothers videos you express opinions and ideas to your audience. As a young teenager I found these videos to be instrumental to my growth as a human being.

Have you ever found your opinions or viewpoints on a subject change after making the video? Are there any old vlogbrothers videos you wish you could go back and remake with a more mature opinion?

Thank you and dftba!

A:

Hey Liam, absolutely loving As You Were, Come Back To Me is a belter. That aside what I wanna know is what’s more important the shoes or the jacket?

PS. Don’t ever change, see you in Notts/Manc x


Q:

Outside of Keith Richards, which guitarist had the biggest impact on you during an interview?

A:

I really enjoy reading the Snoke = Plagueis theories on Star Wars Speculation here. I find them pretty convincing.

I agree that it would make a lot of sense if Snoke was Palpatine's mentor, rather than just some random big bad. So in a way, I hope this theory is correct, because it would add a nice sense of narrative echo and that 'rhyming' aspect Lucas tried to seed throughout the saga.

It's hard to say how the sequels will play out, because now they are in different hands. If they were under Lucas' control, I would say I think I have enough sense of Lucas, from studying his work, to predict the kind of thing he'd do. But I get the idea that TLJ is meant to subvert our expectations - perhaps partly because a lot of fans found The Force Awakens to be safe and predictable. So while I expect there will be echoes and 'rhymes', I find it hard to get a handle on what the new creative team is planning, and where they're going.

To give a quick answer, I do think we will find out about Snoke's background. If we don't, I think that will be frustrating and feel incomplete. The Knights of Ren, I am less sure about. I don't know how learning more about them will fill a gap in the mythos in a satisfying way. I wouldn't want the next SW movies to be reliant on flashbacks and exposition about the past.


Q:

Wish I was around with Crazy Eye. Amazing season!!

A:

Agreed.


Q:

I have kept a diary that I hope to one day turn into a book!

I do have family in North Korea and I get to talk to them often through special brokers that sneak Chinese phones into North Korea. If they wanted to come out I would help them but my grandmother is very old and my father is very sick and too weak to make the dangerous journey.

I do not want to disclose the city I lived in to protect my family but it was in the Northern part of the country.

A:

When I was younger, I really liked being outraged. I liked being outraged about the minting of pennies, about the popularity of certain books or songs, about the obvious stupidity of those who disagree with me, etc.

I now find outrage to be somewhat overrated. Anger can lead to real action that creates change or moves the needle of public opinion on an issue, and that sort of activism is so important. But I'm not as interested in outrage for its own sake as I used to be.


Q:

The shoes

A:

Jimmie Vaughan, which has not aired yet, and Derek Trucks.


Q:

The Knights of Ren, I am less sure about. I don't know how learning more about them will fill a gap in the mythos in a satisfying way. I wouldn't want the next SW movies to be reliant on flashbacks and exposition about the past.

Could it be interesting to explore The Knights of Ren in a separate, parallel movie? Do they play a large enough part in the mythos for that?

A:

How was working with Tom Holland in that Audi commercial?


Q:

In lite of the new Hollywood scandals, did anyone try to get you on the casting couch?

A:

Firstly I want to say that your story really touched my heart! You are an amazing and strong woman, and I wish you the best for the future! My questions are: What culture shocks did you face when you came to South Korea? And how different are the North and South Korean cultures? I'm thinking differences in body language, language, food, customs, values, beliefs, etc... How difficult/easy is it for a North Korean to adapt to Korean society? Is there a lot of discrimination towards North Koreas living in South Korea? (I'm a university student at a university in Sweden and for my final assignment my thesis is how the 65+ years divided have changed the Korean culture, your answers will be of great help, thank you!)


Q:

Just so we're clear here, you do still hate pennies, right?

A:

Hey Liam! What's your absolute favourite song EVER? The one that makes you feel good everytime


Q:

Hey Marc, saw you in Lincoln last year.

I remember seeing that you tried to reconcile with Jon Stewart and have him on your podcast and he pretty much threw it back at you, but offered to sit down and have coffee. Now that he's off the Daily Show, have you had any other contact with him?

A:

After the Solo movie (assuming they don't mess it up), I would like to see a Kenobi movie, and maybe a Boba Fett movie, and currently those are all the anthology episodes I'd personally be rooting for. But of course, other people will have their own choices.


Q:

That kid was amazing. Who wouldn't want to be a Marvel hero? I get along with British peeps.

A:

Harvey never touched me and I auditioned in crotchless chaps. Still heartbroken.


Q:

The first big cultural shock was when I saw South Korean women is very short skirts! North Korean culture is more socially conservative so I was very surprised to see couples in the South holding hands and kissing in public.

Korean society is very family oriented. It was very hard at first to adapt in the South when I didn't have a family to see or talk to anymore. On holidays I didn't know what to do because I had no family.

The South Korean language has so many strange words that are borrowed from English. That took some time to get used to!

It was also difficult to decide on what to study and what career to pursue. In North Korea, I didn't get to choose what my future would look like. It was kind of overwhelming to choose a path to take when there were so many choices.

A:

I still think the continued existence of the penny is a great example of what's wrong with contemporary U.S. politics.


Q:

Imagine

A:

No and don't hold your breath.


Q:

Professor Brooker, what do your colleagues think of your current research area? Also, when something new comes out about Star Wars, do you have more students in your office hours to discuss that as opposed to their studies?

A:

JB! How's it going? My question for you is this: What is the biggest thing that you and "Leon" have in common?


Q:

If you decide not to do a sequel to Special Unit, what Genre 'Musical, Film Noir...' would you think of for your next movie?

A:

How do people in North Korea perceive Dennis Rodman as a person?


Q:

In your time living in Indianapolis, it's gone through some major changes, as have you. As a resident of Indy, what are some good changes you've seen? What are some negative changes to the city? And how has Indianapolis influenced you as a person?

Also have you ever eaten at Love Handle at 10th and Rural? That's currently my favorite place in the city and I hope it continues to do well when it moves to the Mass Ave neighborhood this November-ish.

See you next week! 🐢🐢🐢🐢🐢🐢

Kiwi and Kiwi,

Chris

A:

How many tambourines do you have stockpiled at home and what's your preferred tambourine shape? (You were phenomenal on Saturday btw!)


Q:

Hi Marc, love the podcast. What caused you and Chris Hardwick's feud?

A:

I think some of my colleagues think I try to be a bit of a 'rock star' academic... I do some slightly unusual things, like the year of immersion in David Bowie's life, and writing and producing a graphic novel. I am sure I have some kind of reputation as a guy who does the media-friendly, pop culture, flashy stuff. But my colleagues are very nice people and nobody is unkind about it.

When there's new Star Wars stuff out, I usually can't resist mentioning it in class. Last Monday, I got very excited and offered to show the new trailer -- students told me they didn't want to see it as they were avoiding spoilers, so I waited and watched it at home.

I do use a lot of examples from Star Wars, Blade Runner, Batman and other popular fiction I enjoy to try to illustrate theory, and sometimes I wonder if I overdo it.


Q:

Going great!! The biggest thing... We are both chocolate. Honestly we are both outspoken we our own way. He's a bit more extreme. Im just aggressive in my business matters.

A:

I wrote a script called Curly and Mo' that will stop racism. So yeah. I have a buddy action suicide comedy called FUN that is my dream. I'm a huge Mel Brooks fan and if you are gonna pick a genre you have to do it better than Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein, Silent Movie or High Anxiety. Special Unit is a cop genre buddy film. I kinda used 48 hours as the template. The premise is so weird in this movie that I wanted to ground it in something people were comfortable with, the cop genre, so the disabled angle didn't rattle.


Q:

I don't even know who that is! Ian and Sarah just had to tell me about his relationship with Kim Jung Un.

A:

Love Handle is great. My favorite restaurant in the city right now is probably Milktooth.

Indianapolis has changed a lot in the past decade, and mostly for the better I think. It's a very average midsized American city, which is one of the things I love about it, but I think investments in and around downtown have really paid off.

I wish we had better public transportation and more investment in arts and public spaces, because I think that helps attract young people to a city. (I do find it difficult to recruit to Indianapolis, a concern that is shared with many much larger employers.)

And selfishly, I wish we'd do more to clean up the White River. We have an amazing nature reserve that stretches through the entire city in the form of the White River, and we need to stop dumping raw sewage into it.


Q:

i have a collection of around1500-2000. Round ones and triangular

A:

That was fictional.


Q:

Hey Mr Brooker, since all The Sw and Br are taken can you expand on your knowledge about David Bowie ? He Is one of My biggest inspiration and one of The reasons Im following My path in music, Im curious about his influence in other art fields and básically anything David did I find amazing. Favorite récord ? Cheers from México City!

A:

Holy shit man that's amazing.

I was a big fan of your show when I was a kid and I love your stand up.. And I've got a little brother with severe special needs who loves actions movies..

Am i the exact audience you're targeting?

Seems like it..


Q:

Hi Joy, I actually have two questions:

  1. What is the most outrageous piece of propaganda that you heard regarding the Kim family in North Korea?

  2. Was your relationship with the Chinese man abusive in any way?

A:

Has your opinion on Batman changed over the years? And what about Iron Man?


Q:

Liam, please answer this important question..

''Who built the moon?''

A:

What about Kumail Nanjiani?


Q:

My favourite Bowie LP is probably the LOW album. I think it is a wonderful piece of work, which demonstrated Bowie's capacity for going in unexpected creative directions and which remains influential.

In other art fields, Bowie's most significant contribution is probably to cinema.

I could go on at length but unfortunately I have so many other questions to answer! I would encourage you, if you think you'd find it interesting, to look at my book FOREVER STARDUST: DAVID BOWIE ACROSS THE UNIVERSE, which I hope you can get from Amazon.

Most of my knowledge about Bowie is in there, much more elegantly phrased than I could express it right now.

A:

Holy shit you just describe my target audience. "Disabled people tired of being treated like shit by the world who love action movies" There's just no category for that in the MPAA ratings.


Q:
  1. I remember that a textbook once said that Kim Il-song turned a pinecone in a bomb during the Korean War and killed many Americans with it. As a child I thought it was totally true. Now I laugh at how impossible that is!

  2. The man was not abusive to me. I was lucky in that sense. But it was still so hard to be forced to be with someone that bought me.

A:

I like Iron Man all right these days. (Iron Man is an important-ish character in TATWD.) I still think Batman could use his resources a lot more effectively if his goal is to minimize crime in Gotham.


Q:

Keith

A:

We talked about it on the pocast, episode 820. We're good.


Q:

As a former professor myself, I believe the academy is woefully broken. Dysfunctional systems like tenure review, cronyism, nepotism in hiring, rampant ignorance toward student loan problems, and outright lying from administrators killed my passion for academia... so I left.

What do you seen as the biggest problems facing academia, especially the humanities, right now?

A:

Hi Chris. I used to watch Titus religiously. My emotionally disturbed mother left when I was four. My dad was a physically and psychologically abusive alcoholic sociopath. I watched your show because I could relate and I hoped I'd be able to cope the way you did. Unfortunately it didn't work out so well for me, but I just wanted to thank you for having the courage to talk about stuff from your childhood. Your courage made me feel more comfortable about talking about my own upbringing.

Hey, you know how when you see a dude in a wheelchair you pretty much know his legs are fucked? Can we get wheelchairs to put on our heads?

Edit: Oh yeah by the way, if you really want to get yourself back out there do Hot Ones with Sean Evans. Tell your agent if you don't know. If he doesn't know then get a better agent.


Q:

If you could give your 12yo self any one of your books to read, what one book would you choose?

A:

Hey Liam! The new album is a fuckin’ rocker! Do you ever think of doing a collab with Richard Ashcroft?


Q:

Your conversation with Martin Starr is one of my favorite wtfs. Did you ever take up his offer to meditate?

A:

Personally, in the UK, I think one of the biggest problems is the reliance on student fees, which are extremely expensive and plunge young people into debt. This means universities have had to become more like businesses, providing value for paying customers. This wasn't what university was about when I went, because I was lucky enough to attend as an undergraduate when many students received a grant, and nobody paid fees.

Because of this, I think there's now much more pragmatism and a sense of university being a means towards a specific end - getting a 2.i or First as a result, to ensure a 'graduate job'. There is less of a sense of exploring knowledge and ideas for the sake of it, and immersing yourself in a subject. Students now have to work part-time, and have less opportunity to read around a topic and experiment, as I did. They are more focused on simply and narrowly getting a good grade for the classes they're taking.

Moreover, I think it's taken a while for university managers to catch up to the fact that they are now, unfortunately, running businesses, so there's been a period where some universities struggle, lose students (which means losing money) and try to adapt to these challenges. The university sector is now much more competitive and pragmatic itself.

At the PhD level, there are far too few jobs in academia for the PhDs who are graduating. This really concerns me as I feel I'm personally part of a system training talented young people for a market where there simply aren't enough opportunities.

I'm sure there is corruption, ignorance, mendacity and nepotism in academia, as there is in other fields. There are going to be selfish individuals. But there are also a lot of passionate, hard-working, ethical and kind people.

My concern really about academia is on a more structural level, as I've suggested.


Q:

I was totally jacked, depressed and suicidal, upset about life and the way I was raised then I took the Landmark Forum and transformed my life. Now I'm a movie director. Love the "wheelchair for your head" thing

A:

I would not want my 12-year-old self to read any of my books, I don't think. Maybe my 14-year-old self. I would give him Turtles All the Way Down first, because I pretty much wrote it for him.


Q:

i would love to work with Ashcroft. i love him

A:

I've tried it a couple times, I might get back to it.


Q:

Is Deckard a replicant? Also what do you think of how the symbolism of the unicorn changed in the new movie?

A:

Hi Mr. Titus, I loved your show for the brief time it was on.

Your comedy always seems to be distinctly American and masculine to me (not in a bad way). Have you found that you get crickets from audiences in other countries, since they might lack some of the context for your jokes and stories?


Q:

Have you ever considered writing one of the fictional books that you mention in your novels, perhaps as a short story published online under a pseudonym?

E.g. The Price of Dawn from TFioS: you could release it on April Fool's Day as a tongue-in-cheek over-the-top gory action thriller.

A:

Do you prefer jam or marmalade?


Q:

Hi Marc, huge fan of both the podcast and the Show,

There's a house fire and you can only save one record, what do you pick?

A:

I answered the replicant question above, so I'll repeat that below.

If you mean the way the unicorn became a horse statue, that's a good question. I've seen theories that the horse seems to have had horn that broke off... but other theories that all the wooden animals in 2049 spell out 'RACHAEL', and 'U' for unicorn would disrupt that.

A horse is a unicorn that's been brought down to earth, and made 'real', so in a sense it's perfect if Deckard, who dreamed of unicorns, gave that to his baby girl... a dream made real.

I think it makes much more sense in terms of interest and complexity for us never to know. However, after seeing BR2049, my overriding sense was that Deckard is not a replicant. He does seem to be an even match for K in a fist fight, but then K runs easily through a wall, whereas Deckard takes the door - that, to me, is a key and meaningful moment. And if Tyrell had wanted to set up two replicants to 'fall in love' and have a baby, he wouldn't surely have had to invite Deckard, a Blade Runner, to his office. He could have fabricated a male replicant and engineered the meeting without involving the cops. It seems to me more plausible that the 'miracle' was a child born of a human and a replicant. But I'm glad the film leaves it open. That's just my impression right now. I've always maintained (before BR2049) that if Deckard is a replicant, he's clearly physically weaker than the Nexus 6, and more sophisticated in that he doesn't know he's a replicant. So he's not like Batty, and also seems more convinced of his humanity than Rachael, who accepts quite easily that her memories are false. As Nexus 8s like Sapper are also incredibly strong, unlike Deckard, he's different to those, too. So if he is a replicant, I'm not sure how he fits into any category produced by Tyrell. Of course, the unicorn dream and the unicorn origami is a heavy clue that he's meant to be a replicant in 2019. We don't know how memories were manufactured in the Tyrell era, so it's hard to know how Gaff could have been aware of Deckard's unicorn dream. In short, it is better left as a mystery, and I tended one way (towards replicant) in 2019, and the other way (towards human) in 2049.


Q:

I've only performed in South Africa and they were so receptive and dare I say smarter about America than we are. I want to do a world tour. Just gotta find the way.

A:

I actually wrote a little section of The Price of Dawn for a fundraiser for the Harry Potter Alliance! (And I wrote a few pages of An Imperial Affliction for the copy that Hazel reads in the movie.) But I don't think I could ever sustain either narrative voice for an entire novel. It would feel like an impersonation, if that makes any sense.


Q:

marmalade

A:

I'd save my cats, because most records are replaceable. Though I do have an original pressing of Pink Floyd's Piper at the Gates of Dawn that I'd probably grab.


Q:

Thanks for the insight. Me and my professor are currently in a rather heated discussion about the unicorn/horse and this insight may bring more to light.

A:

Hey Chris, big fan here. Have loved your stuff since I started watching. My question is this: What keeps you going? I've always found solace in dark humor and helping others, so I've always loved your material. You've had a lot of rough times in your life, and not many people could have made it through all you did. As someone who has had his fair share of shitstorms and epic failures, I wanted to ask what keeps you going?

Thanks, Kris


Q:

What are you happiest about right now?

A:

What's your favourite jacket? And can't wait to see u live


Q:

Marc,

I quit cigarettes about 4 years ago and have been vaping ever since. I am at that point, like you were a month ago, where I’m sick of the dependency. My question to you is: How do you create wins when quitting nicotine? What keeps you from nicotine, when all you want is a little taste!

Just got Waiting for the Punch in the mail, it’s a lovely birthday present (tomorrow’s my birthday), looking forward to reading it over and over. Thanks for making my Monday’s and Thursday’s go by just a littler faster.

Boomer Lives!

A:

Well, these are just my current thoughts, but I think that's all anyone has got right now... we are all responding to a movie that only came out last week. I'm glad if my ideas will contribute to your discussion!


Q:

I said it before, I took the Landmark forum.

A:

I'm in a bus with my brother, my wife, and my two kids. There is plenty of Diet Dr. Pepper in this bus, excellent snacks, and passable wifi. It's hard to imagine how I could be happier, to be honest.


Q:

jacket potato

A:

Food works.

Happy Birthday!


Q:

What's something you would like to write about, that people wouldn't expect you to write or even know about?

A:

Due to the fairness in disabilities act the Van Nuys PD is forced to hire four handicapped undercover detectives and their training officer happens to be the worst cop in L.A.

If I knew nothing about you and read the abstract, there is no reason to watch the movie. What reason can you give me to watch?


Q:

Hey John, I've been a long time fan, I started watching Vlogbrothers in 2008 and still pop in from time to time to see what's new. Is it ever strange to you that the people who started watching you in the beginning are grown ups now with their own lives? Do you think your audience changes every few years? And how long do you think the blog brothers will go on?

DFTBA

A:

Any Chance of a second solo album? Love As You Were!


Q:

Hey Marc, what's your favorite Coen brothers movie?

A:

This is a great and tough question. As I've been lucky enough to mainly publish on things I have liked since I was a kid, I think anyone who's looked at my books has a sense of the things I enjoy, and have enjoyed for most of my life.

I haven't written much so far about retro video and computer games of the 1980s, and that's something that fascinates me, which I hope to write about more in the future.

I have a project in the works about JFK and Nixon, which might be unexpected for anyone who knows I write about Batman, Star Wars and other popular culture.

And also I'd love to publish fiction in the future - fiction that begins in verifiable fact and then moves from there into invented territory.


Q:

You have never seen a movie like it and you will laugh out loud. No bullshit.

A:

Thanks for the question. There are some people who've watched consistently for six or eight or ten years and still watch every video, and that's wonderful.

But the vast majority of people who watch regularly now weren't doing so eight years ago, and the vast majority of people who were watching regularly eight years ago aren't now. And that is also wonderful.

Like, I am overjoyed when people find something in our work that makes them want to stick with us over many years.

But it's also awesome to me if you really loved our work at some point and then went on to love a bunch of other things but still think back on your time with us fondly. I have those bands/projects/people in my own life, and I'm grateful for the role they played in my development as a person and a writer and so on.

As for how long vlogbrothers will go on: I don't know. I love the rhythm of a Tuesday. It gives order and structure to my life, and also requires me to make at least SOMETHING every single week no matter what. And I love the relationship we have with our viewers. If any of that goes away someday, we'll probably wrap it up. But for now, I can't imagine my life without the consistency of vlogbrothers.


Q:

Yes why the hell not

A:

I'm kind of a Barton Fink guy, though No Country For Old Men is right up there. Fargo is great, their tightest movie.


Q:

Why were you always so mean to Harry Potter?

A:

what will the world become when AI takes over the comedy circuit? Will the sensitive snowflakes finally start to melt??


Q:

how much star wars fanfiction did you read as research for tatwd?

A:

What’s the definitive Oasis lineup in your eyes?


Q:

hey man its 5:15am here and ive been waiting just to ask you 2 things

  • do you think youll ever do a show in new zealand? (the south island to be percise) . youre my favourite stand up comedian and ive always wanted to see you live. you could come down do some shows and have a vacation

  • do you know of the band my morning jacket and could you please try get one of the members on the podcast? the singer jim james would be brilliant. your one of my heros, there my heros, so you doing a podcast with one of them would be amazing to me.

thanks man i really love your stuff. your latest special was fucking great by the way

A:

He took the attention away from my glorious hair.


Q:

I believe Skynet will open a bunch of clubs the C1000's (comedian1000's) will steal Carlos Mencia's material which was already stolen creating a hilarity worm hole in time and George carlin will be sent back in time to kill Carlos. I can dream.

A:

Quite a bit! I'm most familiar with Harry Potter fanfiction, but I also read a lot of One Direction fic, because in an earlier draft, Daisy and Aza were into 1D. (I kept some 1D easter eggs in the book for fellow fans.) But once I moved it to Star Wars*, I did read quite a bit.

I really love fanfiction. A lot of it is excellent.

  • There were a bunch of reasons I did this, but mostly because the first line of every single movie in this futuristic space opera series is "a long time ago," and the book is very concerned with whether the past is, in fact, in the past. But also, I think Star Wars is this wonderful shared mythology for contemporary humans through which we can look at questions of self and personhood and community and etc.

Q:

bonehead guiggs and alan white. Obviously me and Noel

A:

I might come to New Zealand.

I know the band but I don't really listen to them. I'll give it a try.


Q:

What was your favourite aspect of the production design added to Bladerunner 2049? I'm talking in a world building sense

A:

As a comedian, when are you planning to finally start being funny?


Q:

Will there ever be a film for Looking for Alaska?

A:

What should I name my first born child?


Q:

Oh hi Marc,

What unique advice would you have for a recent college grad English major who wants to avoid the mundane 9-5 day to day week at all costs?

A:

A great and difficult question. I'm trying to answer all of these quickly, so I'm just going to give the first answers that come to me.

My first answer is the 'Joi' technology. I think it added an entirely new dimension to have a form of identity that's distinct from, but similar to, the replicants - a type of human-simulating technology that even replicants look down on, and see as a product. It was a wonderful echo of the 'real boy', 'are replicants human' theme to have Joi apparently developing emotions and more of an autonomous personality. So I think that really added an additional level of complexity to the issues that are at the core and heart of both Blade Runner movies.

On a more visual level: K's coat, the new Spinners, and the Las Vegas statues.


Q:

Tomorrow. Pray for me.

A:

I don't know. The movie rights to LFA were purchased 12 years ago by a studio. They own those rights, and I can't get them back, and so it's not my decision. At the time, the sale of the movie rights was incredibly important to us--it allowed Sarah and I to move to New York so that she could attend graduate school--and so I don't regret selling them, but it has certainly been a long and often painful process over the last 12 years.

That said, there are many new people working at the movie studio in question, so things may be changing. One never knows!

Two other things on this front: First, I think there is something magical about a book that only lives as a book. Harry Potter will forever to me be Daniel Radcliffe, but Holden Caulfield isn't anybody to me except for my Holden Caulfield. Books I love that live only as text feel mine in a way that movies just can't.

Secondly: I got incredibly, lottery-winningly lucky twice in Hollywood. With both The Fault in Our Stars and Paper Towns, I felt respected throughout the process of making and promoting the film. I felt like my work was treated carefully and seriously, and I was lucky to work with genuinely wonderful people. That is rare for authors in Hollywood, and I am very grateful for those experiences.


Q:

Sue

A:

How do you feel about homelessness?


Q:

How can i get a phd in spiderman?

A:

Do those rights extend to a play or other live action experience off screen? Is there any sunset on those rights at which point you could push the issue? (Yes I know IP laws in this country are a pita, but here's hoping)


Q:

How do you like your potatoes?

A:

Your meaning-of-life interview with Jason Segal is something that has suck with me ever since I heard it. Of the interviews you've done, aside from Obama which was epic for being Obama, has there been any conversation that's stayed with you ever since? Or really changed your perspective on things? Also, thanks for the work you do and for the bravery in your transparency.


Q:

You would come up with an original idea, which shows that you're aware of all the existing scholarly literature on Spider-Man and other superheroes, but that you've found something new and different to say.

Then you would write to the research office at universities where you would like to study, and ask them for their PhD proposal guidelines.

You'd write a strong proposal and submit that, and they might be able to match you up with an academic who could supervise your Spidey PhD.

Then you'd have to try to find funding for at least three years of full-time study.

But it sounds like a good idea! I would read an academic book about the cultural history of Spider-Man.

A:

There is a sunset on the ownership of their rights: It is the heat death of the universe. :)

We've had lots of lawyers look at it. They own the rights, and will forever. (So it goes!)


Q:

I Like them roasted

A:

Any time I talk to someone who's been around for a long time, I feel my knowledge and understanding of life and the past become deeper.


Q:

After seeing both Blade Runner and 2049, does it make more sense for Deckard to be human or a replicant? Either way, it's a 'miracle' that Rachel got pregnant, but I'm curious as to where you fall on that debate.

A:

What comes first when you have a new idea for a book: the themes, the intention/obstacles/conflict, the characters, or something else entirely?

Follow up: at what point during writing the book does the title become apparent?


Q:

Best meal you can cook?

A:

How much upkeep does that gorgeous moustache require?


Q:

I think it makes much more sense in terms of interest and complexity for us never to know.

However, after seeing BR2049, my overriding sense was that Deckard is not a replicant.

He does seem to be an even match for K in a fist fight, but then K runs easily through a wall, whereas Deckard takes the door - that, to me, is a key and meaningful moment.

And if Tyrell had wanted to set up two replicants to 'fall in love' and have a baby, he wouldn't surely have had to invite Deckard, a Blade Runner, to his office. He could have fabricated a male replicant and engineered the meeting without involving the cops.

It seems to me more plausible that the 'miracle' was a child born of a human and a replicant. But I'm glad the film leaves it open. That's just my impression right now.

I've always maintained (before BR2049) that if Deckard is a replicant, he's clearly physically weaker than the Nexus 6, and more sophisticated in that he doesn't know he's a replicant. So he's not like Batty, and also seems more convinced of his humanity than Rachael, who accepts quite easily that her memories are false.

As Nexus 8s like Sapper are also incredibly strong, unlike Deckard, he's different to those, too. So if he is a replicant, I'm not sure how he fits into any category produced by Tyrell.

Of course, the unicorn dream and the unicorn origami is a heavy clue that he's meant to be a replicant in 2019. We don't know how memories were manufactured in the Tyrell era, so it's hard to know how Gaff could have been aware of Deckard's unicorn dream.

In short, it is better left as a mystery, and I tended one way (towards replicant) in 2019, and the other way (towards human) in 2049.

A:

On titles: For me, the title often becomes apparent when my publisher is like, "We are going to announce this book next week, and we cannot announce it without a title." Like, I think the title to The Fault in Our Stars was not fully decided until the day before the book became available for preorder. In general, I'm pretty crap at titles.

As for how books begin: For me, they usually begin with characters and a question. With Turtles All the Way Down, the character was Aza and the question was, How do you find a sense of self when you feel like your self isn't really yours?


Q:

cereal

A:

Not much. I trim it when I taste it.


Q:

How do you find time to write and still play keyboards for Duran Duran?

A:

Are you going to be doing anything more with 100 days? I really enjoyed that series.


Q:

Who’s got the best elbows you’ve ever seen?

A:

Hi Marc. I look forward to the podcast twice a week. What was the moment you realized that WTF had become something special?


Q:

I published my last book on Batman in 2012, and we worked on Paper Gods for a 2015 release... then my Bowie book came out in January 2017. It was a busy time! Simon and the guys understand that I'm trying to hold down another job, and they're really good about it.

A:

Thanks. My best friend Chris and I went on a 100-day health and fitness journey, and filmed the whole thing.

I don't know if we'll do another season of the show. It was somewhat expensive to make, and it's hard to pay for a show with high production values without some kind of corporate sponsorship (which we didn't really want).

That said, I've kept going with exercise in a big way. (In fact, I'm probably in better shape now than I was at the end of the show.) I still work out with Laura, our trainer on the show, twice a week, and I still run a few times a week.

I really enjoy running, and the mental health benefits to exercise have been genuinely life changing for me. One of the challenges of spending the next month on the road is that our schedules are somewhat busy, making exercise difficult--but I'm trying to eat well and get in quick, intense workouts when I can.


Q:

Debbie Gwyther.. She has 3

A:

The two-part interview with Louis CK.


Q:

Have you ever decided to end your childhood rivalry with Harry Potter?

A:

Played much Nintendo with Hank yet? Who's winning?


Q:

Hey Liam, I noticed that in various instances you sung "There are many things that I would like to say to you but I don't speak Chinese/Japanese/Korean/Spanish.../Whatever"

Do you plan to pick up a foreign language at all, and if so, which one?

A:

Marc...love ya man!
When do you plan on returning to Iowa City for more existential conversations about Dave Matthews Band?


Q:

I now focus most of my attention on my beloved son, Scorpius, who I am glad to say has inherited my beautiful hair and sense of gothic glamour.

A:

Hank is working on HIS book, An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, and so does not have as much time for Super Nintendo as I would like.

I am, however, mopping the floor with my seven-year-old at Super Mario Kart.


Q:

i would love to speak French

A:

I like Iowa City. I don't have immediate plans, but I'd go back there to perform.


Q:

How similar do you think our present is to the dystopian future presented in the original Bladerunner?

A:

Would you comment on David Foster Wallace as an influence for you and this book?


Q:

If Ireland win here do I stay in the pub and get pissed or go the club and try and pull?

A:

Hey Marc, big fan of the podcast and your show! I've just got two questions...

Do you have any favorite guests you've had on your podcast?

Fav Beatles Album?

Thanks so much for doing this!


Q:

Good and interesting question!

Los Angeles does not look much like LA 2019, as far as I've ever experienced it. I think this is partly due to the fact that the film's location shifted from East to West coast during pre-production (and was originally San Francisco, I believe).

While we are (mostly) more concerned with environmental issues now, we've obviously not experienced the kind of environmental disasters that lead to the climate of BR2019. I can't say whether contemporary LA has as much Asian influence as LA 2019 seems to in Blade Runner. Unfortunately, of course, we don't have Spinners, though it could be said that VR enables us to explore and investigate 3D space like Deckard's ESPER viewer.

In terms of technology, ironically I think we are far closer to the Joi type holograms now than we are to replicants. As such, I think BR2049 actually comes closer to our present. We don't seem a long way from having our own versions of Joi, but I think bioengineering human life is a long way off.

So, ultimately, I think Blade Runner is more of an alternate universe than a future dystopia now, but BR2049 seems to have quite close echoes of our current society.

Maybe, ironically, Blade Runner has more in common in some ways with 1982 than it does with 2017?

A:

When you have experiences that are abstract and internal, it's very difficult to find language for them. Language struggles in the face of pain (especially chronic physical pain); Elaine Scarry in her brilliant book The Body in Pain wrote that pain destroys language. Think of the way you moan or groan when you're in terrible pain rather than being able to find words to express it directly and clearly. When reading Infinite Jest and parts of The Pale King, I felt like Wallace had found some form for my pain, a way of holding it and looking at it, and I will always be grateful for that. Whether and how it affected my writing is harder to say, but as a reader and person, is was a tremendous gift to me.


Q:

go to the pub

A:

It's really hard to pick a favorite guest. I've been thinking about the Springsteen one a lot lately.

The Beatles Second Album is one of the first records I ever had and I love that album. But I'm going to go with Abbey Road.


Q:

What is your favorite brand of eyeliner?

A:

What's Bill Gates like in person?


Q:

Is there a Don’t Look Back in Anger demo with you on vocals?

A:

Hey Marc, do you still hate the hat?


Q:

Urban Decay, but as a cheap 'dupe', Barry M.

A:

Very nice, and extraordinarily knowledgeable. I think the Gates Foundation's motto is something like, "Dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy and productive life." And during the time I spent with Bill, I felt that he was truly, truly dedicated to that idea.


Q:

no but there should be

A:

Hate's a strong word.


Q:

If Batman reprogrammed and weaponized R2D2 and C3PO would they be able to infiltrate the Joker's hideout defeating him and his henchman?

A:

Big fan here John. I have 2 questions here:

  1. As a person who found you while at the age of 14, and one who has now become an 'adult' at the age of 20, I am still struck by how your are able to get into the heads of teenagers so much better that pretty much everyone else. Your books have been helpful to not just me, but my friends, and even my parents, who said later on that they got a greater understanding on my actions as a teenager. One thing I loved the most about your work, both as an author and a content creator is how you talked TO the teenagers, not AT them. Treating them as fellow friends rather than talking down. I guess in essence, my question is this: How do you have such an amazing understanding of the minds of people that are over half your age?

  2. Do you have any plans of visiting India? It really is quite an interesting country, and there are many fans here who would love to meet you.

Take Care

Love from India,

-Yash


Q:

How much marching powder had gone up your nose before the Norton interview?

Got standing tickets for Birmingham in december, can't fucking wait! Legend

A:

Hey Marc,

My favorite interview of yours was the one with Paul Thomas Anderson. I think your approach in going step by step through his filmography and asking just about the perfect questions got fascinating insights to all of his movies.

My question is have you thought about going about this approach with the other directors you have on with expansive filmographies?

I know that you like to just go at it like a normal conversation, but that one really felt like you wanted the information because you were a fan of his work.

Anyway, thanks for all the pods and everything else you do, you make the day go by a bit faster on Mondays and Thursdays. Love ya.


Q:

No, because I think part of the point about Joker is he doesn't have a hideout... he is the opposite of Batman. He doesn't have a Joker-cave. Joker is everywhere and nowhere, and can't be tracked down to any one place.

But yes, they could do that to Penguin.

A:

Thank you for the kind words.

  1. I didn't have any understanding of teenage culture or slang or whatever when I was a teenager, and I don't have any understanding of it now. But I think the emotional experiences of adolescent are at least to some extent universal--there's a reason bildingsromans have been around for a long time, asking basically the same questions across the centuries. I think teens are interesting because they're asking those big questions and making big decisions independently for the first time, and there's an intensity and anguish and thrill in doing anything for the first time.

  2. I would love to visit India! I almost went last year, but family obligations ended up keeping me here. I travel a lot less than I did before we had kids, and I want to limit my travel until they're old enough to join us, but that shouldn't be too much longer.


Q:

i dont do cocaine before a performance smart ass. i wait until afterwards

A:

That's right, but also there weren't that many movies. With some directors who have been around a long time, you have to pick and choose. Because they're not all good. Paul's are all interesting.


Q:

How do you feel about the fan theory that Jar-Jar is actually a powerful force user?

A:

Do you think it'll be weird when your children are old enough to read your books? Is there a certain age at which you'd allow them to read them?


Q:

Reading Fest or Leeds Fest?

A:

Really enjoyed your talk with Bill Simmons last week, when is he going to make an appearance on WTF?


Q:

I think it's convincing, in a fun way, and if anything it makes the prequels more interesting. I admire the detail and thought that people have put into it.

A:

Part of me thinks they just don't find my job interesting enough to read them. (Like, I don't think our kids often pause to consider what their parents do for work, because they're busy thinking about pokemon.) But of course if they want to read them, I'll be happy to share them. As for an age: I don't know. Maybe 14? It's hard to guess, because I have no idea what it's like to have a child over the age of seven.


Q:

BOTH

A:

We'll find a time.


Q:

Did you like 2048?

A:

What Mountain Goats songs resonated with you while writing the new book?


Q:

Hi Liam

Loving the new tunes! How does life as a modern rock n roll star compare to the rock n roll star life of the 90's?

A:

Marc - What’s a favorite joke / bit of yours that bombs but personally you still love?


Q:

I liked 2049...

A:

I can't pick just one! I listened to early stuff a lot while writing this book. Songs that were on frequent rotation included "Source Decay," "Going to Maine," and "Going to Marrakesh."


Q:

its the exact same

A:

"If you're ever yelling at a woman, all you should be saying is, 'Why can't you be my mommy? Why are you NOT my mommy?'"

Rarely gets a laugh.


Q:

Who is your favorite side character in the Star Wars universe? General Ackbar, TR8R, etc.

A:

what is your favourite literary quote?


Q:

What needs to happen before you place a saxophone track on your next album? Ps. Will you come to the Netherlands anytime soon? Love ya bud!

A:

Hi Marc and Brendan, this for both of you guys:

If you weren't producing the podcast, writing, acting, or doing stand-up what do you think you'd be doing for work and where would you be doing it?

That's it. Thank you for the laughs, the introspection, and the honesty in your work. Waiting for the Punch will be on my doorstep when I get home from work today!


Q:

Tough question! If Lando counts as a side character, I love Lando.

Back in the day, when I used to play with the mini-action figures and make up adventures for them, two of my favourites were Walrus Man and Hammerhead (this is before they were called Momaw Nadon and Ponda Baba). I also love Bossk - his design and costume, and his brief appearance in ESB, captivated my imagination.

So, I'm going to say the Cantina creatures and Bossk. I would also love to see more of Dengar in the Han Solo movie.

A:

"O Jamesy let me up out of this." from the last chapter of Ulysses.


Q:

ill need tohave shit in my ears for that to happen

A:

MM: I'd like to think I'd be a sous-chef on the way to becoming a chef, but I'd probably be working at a record store.

BM: I'd probably still be working in live television, a job I would not have given up if I didn't have the podcast.


Q:

Do you think it was possible for Jodorowsky's Dune to have been made, thus superseding Star Wars as the definitive science fiction movie of all time?

A:

A number of years ago, a scandal familiar to our current pop culture climate broke out in the YouTube community. A number of men affiliated with DFTBA were revealed to have behaved severely inappropriately with younger Nerdfighters. As far as I know, the men's career's (rightfully) never recovered.

I still struggle with the impact of this event even though I was in my late teens when it happened. I went to events hosted by these people, bought all of their music. I no longer consume any of that media that had meant so much to me. I had a treasured photo with friends where one of the men gave me a hug that now repulses me when I think of what that person did with fans my age. Being a Nerdfighter was a huge part of my adolescence, and a chunk of that experience will now always be tainted because of what happened with those men and how the community reacted.

Do you have any thoughts on how fans of media can cope when it is revealed that people they admired engaged in this type of horrible behavior? With more women being brave enough to come forward into an increasingly more accepting climate, how can we as consumers support these women while dealing with the fact that media once associated with beloved memories is now no innocently consumed?


Q:

What is your favourite type of biscuit?
And what is your favourite brand of tea?

It’s gotta be hobnobs and yorkshire tea for me.

A:

Hi Marc and Brendan

I'm a big fan of the podcast. I'm going to ask a super generic question, since my mind is blanking right now.

Who would you guys love to have on the podcast? (both dead and alive)


Q:

I have been to an exhibition of production designs for this version of Dune, but I don't know a great deal about it beyond that, and it would take someone more expert than me to say whether it could have been made, sorry.

From what I've seen, I would certainly like it to have been made - though I also think Lynch's Dune is flawed but fascinating, and I think Villeneuve's Dune would be fantastic.

However, one thing I can answer is that I don't think an adaptation of Dune would beat Star Wars as 'definitive science fiction movie'. I think Star Wars, much as I love it, is really space opera or space fantasy, not strictly speaking science fiction. So I think they're in slightly different genres, and not in direct competition.

A:

Thanks for this question, which I think is a really important one. I'm sorry that these once-happy memories have become painful ones.

(For those unaware, several male YouTubers abused and/or assaulted young female fans. Some of them released music through our merch distribution company, although we obviously parted ways with them when we became aware of what had happened.)

As to your question: I think it's really difficult when someone you admire and trust violates that trust by abusing the platform they've been given. It's a real betrayal, and as you describe very beautifully, it's awful to have treasured pictures become repulsive and scary. But your friendships--the help you gave other people, the help they gave you, the love you shared together--were still real and important, and I hope you're able to feel that. I suppose that's not really advice so much as commiseration, but again, I'm sorry, and I appreciate you sharing this, because so many people are going through similar experiences now amid other news of people using their power to abuse.


Q:

Rich tea - stone cold classic and yorkshire tea

A:

Dead: Richard Pryor

Alive: Albert Brooks


Q:

Thank you for your reply.

It's the "opera" factor of Star Wars that makes it so fun, coupled with the over the top special effects that creates such a powerfully popular piece of cinema.

A:

what is your favourite piece of feedback that you have ever recieved about your work?


Q:

Are you going to add Europe, South America and Asia dates for your tour next year? Please fucking do, As You Were was amazing and there are so many people desperate to see you!

A:

Hey Marc,

What are your thoughts on Canada and when are you moving here?


Q:

Personally, I also have a soft spot for the Flash Gordon movie, which is another amazing space opera.

A:

One time someone wrote me and said--I'm quoting directly here--"Your book made me feel something I hadn't felt before. Not like I needed to poop or was about to throw up, but something else."

I've always thought that was quite a compliment.


Q:

I will indeed

A:

It's something I ask myself every day.

My thoughts are, what I used to think might be boring about Canada seems very relaxing to me now.


Q:

Is Alan Moore a genius, a crazy person, or both? How does this designation (whichever it may be) shape how we look at his comics?

A:

What percentage of Turtles All the Way Down did you sign in each colour of Sharpie? Kudos on getting all 200,000 of the books signed!


Q:

Which song do you enjoy performing live the most?

A:

Hello Marc and hello Brendan, first of all I wanted to say thanks for the weekly podcasts, your twice a week treats are what made me start listening to podcasts and I am thankful. Also ironically I think I'm one of the few people who came across you first via your IFC show, which I miss.

Anyways, my question is what jazz music would you recommend to someone like me? I'm fairly young, well at least legal to drink now since the beginning of October, and have gotten into recently. I listen to most of the general and popular stuff, but I think you could send me into a path that I don't want to return from after I get lost in the awe of some great fucking music. So what's a must to listen to? Thank you for reading man, and finally Boomer Lives!


Q:

Well, Alan Moore and I 'have history', in that he was quite hostile over something I said a few years ago, and I wrote a response to it online.

I think his work from the 1980s, apart from The Killing Joke which I think is overrated, is pretty much without peer. I think he was the best writer of superhero comics during that period, and I don't know if anyone has ever written more important superhero stories in the decades since. So I have boundless respect for his work during the 1980s.

More recently, I haven't enjoyed his work nearly as much, and while I don't want to speculate too much about someone I don't know, I get the impression that the way he has been treated by the industry has made him feel bitter and isolated.

If I had written WATCHMEN and had to watch DC bastardising it the way they have with BEFORE WATCHMEN and DOOMSDAY CLOCK, believe me, I would be extremely bitter.

So I think he's an extremely talented writer who made a more important contribution to comics, particularly superhero comics, than anyone else I can think of during the 1980s. I still value, respect and enjoy his work from that period.

I don't think he is 'crazy', either. I don't agree with a lot of what he's said in more recent interviews, and I don't love what he's written creatively in more recent years, but so be it. That often happens with creators: that we love their work from a certain period, and feel less connection with other periods.

Personally I enjoy him, and his work, for what he was in his prime.

A:

I think the most was green, which was around 30%. Red and blue were next, probably around 20% each. I got really fond of the reddish purple color--Sharpie calls it berry--so that might've gotten another 15%. The rarest color was silver; I only signed about 300 in silver, because I don't like the way silver sharpies glide across paper.

(I spent a lot of time thinking about this stuff.)


Q:

Live Forever

A:

Get Kamasi Washington's Epic


Q:

Considering the comparitively low initial figures of BR 2049, do you think it has the same chance as the original of becoming a cult classic?

A:

Hi John! My question is: How much writing have you done in the real physical location Cheyenne, Wyoming?


Q:

Love the new album, you cheeky potato.

What are the chances I'll get to take a picture with you at your upcoming Colorado show?

Also, what did the Penguin say to the astronaut?

A:

Hi Marc! huge fan of the podcast here. Who are your top 5 favourite guitar players?


Q:

Yes, I do. I actually would prefer that to a franchise of BR movies, which I think would threaten to dilute the mythos, and lower the incredibly high standard set by BR2019 and 2049 so far.

I was against the whole idea of a sequel. I think BR2049 pulled it off, but it would be so hard to sustain that quality for a series of further movies, and I think it would be a great idea just to leave it, perhaps for another thirty years.

BR2049 has already attracted incredibly close, devoted and detailed attention, to an intense degree. People are obsessing about it. It could be argued that it's becoming a cult classic already, within a week.

A:

Literally none! [context]


Q:

is that you Deano?

A:

Peter Green, Jimmie Vaughan, Hendrix, Buddy Guy, Keith.

And Angus Young. Just thought of that one.


Q:

Was it hard to accept the news that you didn't make the cut for My Chemical Romance auditions?

A:

Hey John! I'm a huge fan and just finished Turtles All the Way Down. The book really moved me and I identified with Aza on so many levels. I too also struggle with OCD; mainly obsessive/intrusive thoughts and contamination fears. You wrote about these issues so accurately. You made me feel like I'm not alone in my thoughts and behaviours so thank you.

How did your experience with mental illness shape Turtles All the Way Down?


Q:

What are the chances of seeing some Pretty Green US Stores?

A:

What has been your favorite album of 2017?

I've got to go with Villains by Queens of the Stone Age.


Q:

Do you have the number for my local burns unit?

A:

Thanks for reading the book and for your kind words about it. You aren't alone, and I'm glad the book helped you feel it.

I couldn't have written the book if I hadn't lived with OCD for most of my life. But I also couldn't write the book while my OCD was poorly managed, because when I'm sick I can't write (and sometimes can't even read).

I don't want to further the dangerous romantic lie that artists need to be close to madness or whatever to do their work. It's true that people working in creative fields have higher than average rates of mental illness, but so do lawyers. So do teachers. I don't write best when I'm putting myself in danger; I write best when I'm treating my chronic health problem with care and consistency.

So my experience with OCD shaped the book profoundly, because when writing about Aza's experiences I was leaning a lot upon my own. And it was definitely the first time I was writing about something that was in my past but also still in my present, because I still have this and expect to live with it the rest of my life. But I could only write the book because I had a longish period of wellness (thanks to a combination of stability/medication/exercise/therapy).


Q:

definitely up for bringing it to the US

A:

I've been catching up on a lot of old records and ones I didn't know about. I just got the new Replacements Live at Maxwell's in Hoboken. It's pretty great.


Q:

Given your success in academia, developing a research agenda around things you love and also landing reliable teaching positions, what advice would you give to current graduate students? (Like, say, someone getting a PhD in contemporary lit and going on the job market in a year or two... Asking for a friend, of course)

A:

Do you think you will write some dystopia into your novels in the future?

(I asked this during the book tour in NYC, my answer didn't get picked. :( )


Q:

How have you celebrated John Lennons birthday?

A:

Hey Marc,

When are you gonna interview somebody from Phish? Those guys are all huge Zappa fans and have battled their own demons and I bet the convo would be fucking killer

But besides pestering about dream interviews, I wanted to say thanks for letting people who don’t always know where to turn to have a place where they can feel welcome, where they can hear someone going through the same shit they’re going or have gone through. It’s not always the happiest stories but goddammit if they don’t all resonate in some way or another.

Boomer lives!


Q:

The market is unfortunately tough, and maybe getting tougher. There are more people gaining PhDs now than there were when I got mine, so there's more competition.

The obvious advice would be to load up your profile with relevant experience beyond 'just' getting a PhD (which I know is a huge achievement in itself).

So, an article in a peer-reviewed journal is great. I would suggest trying, if possible, to not take too much directly from your PhD, as I think it's good to publish the PhD as a book. However, having published one chapter from it as an article won't hurt, and could conceivably help. I wouldn't suggest that you publish more than one chapter from your PhD as articles, as I think that does weaken the chances of getting the whole thing published as a book.

Conference presentations and invited talks. You can write to heads of department and ask if they could use an unpaid talk about your research area (they might pay). You can make contacts and expand your network at conferences. Discuss the challenges you're facing with people on your level, and if they're senior, it's great to have mentors and guidance outside your own university. You will always need people to write you a great reference and to give you independent advice, so if you find someone senior who seems nice and helpful, I think that's really valuable and a contact to cherish.

Experience working on journals. I set all my PhD students to work on Cinema Journal as assistants. If anyone you know (one of the contacts mentioned above) works on or edits a journal, you could ask if they could use assistance. This is great experience, again, and helps to build useful contacts.

Teaching. To get a job as a lecturer, you have to have proven experience of success as a teaching assistant, lecturer or similar. Again, I would advise doing this for free if you have to, as it will help you get a job later.

Those are some pretty bare-bones basics, but if you'd like to follow up with another reply, please do.

A:

I'm no good at predicting the future. But I love reading dystopian novels! In fact, the new series of Crash Course literature will be focusing on dystopias.


Q:

im going out for a mexiican and will raise a glass to the man himself

A:

Yeah, as soon as I get done listening to everything they've ever recorded.


Q:

Have you read any Star Wars novels by other authors? If so, which were your favorites?

Thanks for doing this AMA!

A:

Hi John, who do you currently look up to the most and why? Have you told them that you look up to them?

Good luck on the tour and congrats on the early success of your new book!


Q:

What's currently your favourite song?

A:

Hey Marc

What's the usual process for getting a guest onto the podcast and how did you get Obama on there?

Thanks!


Q:

Thank you!

I've read the Zahn trilogy, Shadows of the Empire, the adaptations of the Original and Prequel trilogy movies, some oddities like Tales of the Bounty Hunters and a few other novels (like Young Jedi Knights) just for research on my 2002 book. I also read a lot of fanfic.

I really enjoyed Heir to the Empire and Shadows of the Empire.

A:

I really admire my brother. Don't tell him though.


Q:

Greedy Soul

A:

BM: I'd say about 50% of the guests come directly to us and 50% go through the booking agency we work with.

Short answer on the process to get Obama is that the White House contacted us first. Long answer is heard on episode 614 where Marc and I explained the whole shebang. http://www.wtfpod.com/podcast/episodes/episode_614_-_the_president_was_here


Q:

Thoughts on The Clone Wars animated series and what it contributed to the Star Wars canon?

A:

What's your favorite Wine?


Q:

Hey Liam, what's your current favourite clothing brand besides your own? Cheers x

A:

If you had Trump on your podcast what would your first question be?


Q:

I must admit I haven't followed the animated series. Sorry! I know this is an oversight on my part. It's a question of how much time I have, and I've just shamefully neglected this aspect of the Star Wars canon.

A:

bourbon.


Q:

Engineered Garments

A:

What's wrong with you?


Q:

Hi there!

How did you get involved in writing media for two very popular sci-fi franchises, and how were you able to make them considered canon by their respective owned companies?

A:

Hi, John,

To what extent do you think Aza is an unreliable narrator? I adored the characters in TatwD but found them occasionally flat. Was this intentional - to show us how consumed in her own thoughts Aza can be that the other characters occasionally seem to be dichotomous in falling in and out of favour with her (especially Daisy, to a lesser extent Davis)?


Q:

You ever find the guy who took your sunglasses?

A:

Thanks for your question! The answer is that my work, as academic commentary, is outside official canon and independent of those franchises. Fortunately, we have academic freedom to write about popular culture which is someone else's copyright -- I'm only really restricted in terms of using images. So I didn't have to seek permission from DC or Lucasfilm to publish my books, and they are about those fictional universes, rather than directly contributing to them.


Q:

She's certainly a poor observer of the world outside of herself, both when it comes to character and when it comes to everything else. That was intentional, and it was important to me, because to me one of the horrors of obsessive thought spirals is that they're intensely isolating. They make it so that Aza can't connect to the people around her in the way she wants, and also the people who love her can't connect with her as deeply as they want to.

My hope was that the reader would be able to see more of Daisy and Davis than Aza could, but it's no coincidence that Daisy and Davis's names are so similar. Aza struggles to see other people, even vastly different people, as anything other than not-Aza.

A:

i did


Q:

I want to get into Star Wars but don't understand the story too well. What order do you recommend I watch them? I've only seen one or two so far.

A:

Would you ever stop doing vlogbrothers? I've been watching since middle school and it's been a big part of my YouTube regimen. I appreciate all that you and Hank do!


Q:

You are the Stone Cold Steve Austin of music. Who is your favourite wrestler?

Please play Gas Panic in december.

A:

I would say watch Star Wars: A New Hope (1977) first, and if I were you, I would try what's called 'machete order'.


Q:

I'm sure will stop someday, because, you know, everything ends--but I don't foresee that day now. I love the structure that vlogbrothers brings to my life, and I love the connection Hank and I have to each other and to the community of viewers. It's still so fun.

A:

big daddy. Old Skool


Q:

Do you think off-world should be depicted in a future Blade Runner sequel? Aesthetically I think the polluted Earth is a perfect backdrop to the decay of humanity.

A:

Having recently started reading Turtles all the Way Down, I've come across a lot of themes and specific anecdotes also present in your podcast Dear Hank and John. Do you actively try to incorporate these elements into your story or is it more coincidental. Or something else entirely?


Q:

Do you like reading on your free time? If so, what's your favorite type of book or material to read?

A:

If they are going to make another sequel, I admit that does sound like a good idea. I think sometimes though it's best to leave the audience curious, and not to show us everything. Remember what happened with the Star Wars prequels! To my mind, it was better when I had to imagine young Obi-Wan with Anakin, rather than watch Attack of the Clones.


Q:

It's more coincidental. The podcast reflects what I'm thinking each week, and when I was in the thick of writing this book, I was mostly thinking about the book and its concerns. In a few cases, I talked about something in the pod and then later thought, oh that would be good for the book.

More than anything else we make, the podcast reflects how Hank and I really are with each other and what we're personally passionate about.

A:

i don't read books, i only read minds


Q:

Do you think the main storyline of the Star Wars will finish with episode IX?

A:

Given that you have previously identified as a staunchly anti-unicorn individual, how do you feel about "Unicorn Tolerance" on the new tMG album?


Q:

What's a good Winston o boogie tune to bang on for his birthday?

A:

I think the main saga is the story of the Skywalkers, so I think it should end with IX, yes.

That also means that either Luke has to be in IX, or that Rey has to turn out to be a Skywalker (maybe the first option is more likely).

I see Star Wars essentially as a family saga.


Q:

I loved that song, actually. That whole album meant so much to me, because I was a goth kid in the early 1990s. (My first concert was The Cure!) And so it took me back to a part of my past I hadn't been able to visit in a long time. Really great album.

A:

day in the life


Q:

*spoiler*

Do you think Joi came up with te name "Joe" for officer K from some program, or did she actually pick it because she had grown to know him? Did she actually love him, or was that also just an algorithm?

A:

Is there a difference between the book you originally wrote, and the one that is now being published?


Q:

If you could have a lifetime supply of any beer, on tap, in your house, but you could only choose one brand, which brand would you choose?

A:

I think it's part of her default programming, which is what makes it sadder.

But also I think the story has less meaning if Joi doesn't evolve and develop over time, so I think it's also tempting to conclude that she did form more of an independent personality.

That doesn't mean she genuinely loved him. I think she was working within her programming, not resisting it. I imagine she still had default subroutines (or whatever we want to fall it) that formed part of her vocabulary and the way she communicated and related to the world. So even if she was developing feelings, I think it's likely that she could only express them through the emotions and the dialogue she had available, like calling someone a 'Joe'.


Q:

I probably deleted 80% of the first draft over the course of revisions, which is pretty standard for me. The first draft of Turtles All the Way Down was completely bonkers. (I mean, the finished novel is still quite fantastical in plot, but it's a pale shadow of its former self in terms of bonkersness.)

A:

Guinness


Q:

Hi professor, thanks for doing this AMA. Just my opinion but it's full of tons of quality answers even to questions with few up votes.

I have a question about 2049, and Joi specifically. When K first meets Mariette, the prostitute, he's outside, Joi is in his pocket and not visible, but later she remarks that she could tell he liked Mariette. This implied that she's in a sort of 'always on' state, as does her initial introduction, where her and K have a conversation before her hologram turns on.

After the sex scene, we see Mariette slip a tracking device (I assume) into K's jacket. Immediately after, Joi becomes visible, tells Mariette that she can go.

My question is, do you think it's possible that Joi saw the tracking device? To me that seems to make more sense than this otherwise incredibly intelligent program not being able to tell what's happening in a ~400 square foot apartment. If she did see the device, and didn't inform K, wouldn't that change her character substantially?

A:

Anything in particular you could share that was bonkers and was then cut, the way that you told us that a cut ending for TFIOS involved Hazel and Van Houten getting gunned down by a drug cartel?


Q:

Will Eh LA get a proper release?

A:

I think the Mariette and Joi situation is incredibly ambiguous and confusing.

Did Joi really invite Mariette to the apartment, or is she just saying that because K wants to hear it?

It does seem that Joi sounds her 'ringtone' whenever other women are around, as if she's declaring her presence and possibly warning them off, being possessive and jealous about K.

I don't think Joi's responsibilities involve scanning the apartment to know what's going on. Her basic job is to entertain, please and reassure K - to be a good companion to him. I don't know whether we see her warning him of danger, or pointing out risks to him - does she do that in San Diego, for instance? I know she tries to rouse him from unconsciousness.

So I'm suggesting that we don't know if it's in her programming to alert him to things like a sex worker replicant putting something in his jacket.

Maybe she saw it and didn't think K wanted or needed to know about it. Maybe she saw it but was in an emotionally confused state because of Mariette's presence. Maybe she trusts K to know what's best.

But yes, ultimately you're right. If she saw it was a tracking device and didn't tell K, that affects our view of her character.

The reason I am trying to find reasons around it is because otherwise, I think Joi's character is very consistent -- she serves K, she wants to make him happy, she's affectionate and attached to him -- and I don't see how her character, as we perceive it, would fit with her deceiving him and not informing him about something that could lead him into harm. Though her personality develops and she evolves more consciousness and independence, I don't see how it would fit that she deliberately neglects to tell him something so important. So I'm trying to work out excuses for her behaviour.


Q:

There was a shootout in a Chuck E. Cheese that lasted through, like, the first THREE drafts before I finally abandoned it.

A:

without a doubt


Q:

How much flack do you get from people who claim you have a “Mickey Mouse degree” and how do you deal with it?

A:

How many Pokemon are in your Pokedex so far?


Q:

Hi liam, as you were is awesome, what's your favourite alcoholic drink mate?

A:

I don't, any more. I used to get more of that kind of thing, when I was completing my PhD, which was a cultural history of Batman.

Now I think it's fairly obvious that I am doing alright for myself, so it's harder for people to say I wasted my time and money (which they used to!)

I think if you believe in something, and think what you're doing is worthwhile, you don't get seriously affected by anyone putting it down.

And if people say things that make you doubt your choices, that's a healthy opportunity to reflect, examine your decisions, and think about it. You could either conclude that yes, you made the right choices, or that no, you made mistakes, and could do differently in future. Either of those results would be positive in a way. If you are confident, you can welcome criticism, as it makes you think. I don't mind people having different views about my work, as long as they aren't gratuitously insulting.


Q:

Just tried to check, but it said, "Update to Continue."

A:

tequila


Q:

Alright Liam, massive fan of the new album.

My dad saw you and r kid live in 95 and said it was the best gig he’s been to. So my question is, what was your favourite or most memorable gig you have been to/performed at?

A:

Stone roses Blackpool


Q:

Mr. Gallagher.

Who is one band that you'd love to open for?

As you were! x

A:

Rolling Stones


Q:

are you a breasts, legs or arse man?

A:

partial to the odd elbow


Q:

I believe that I can rock a parka as good as you, however, I cannot decide on which coloured jeans go best with my sand coloured desert boots, black or raw denim? EDIT:spelling

A:

dark blue all the way


Q:

Massive fan here, Liam. Who's your favourite Man City player at the moment?

Thanks for all of the biblical music! x

A:

Sergio Aguero


Q:

Hello LG, you was rockin at Benicassim fest chief

1, What's your favourite song off the new album?

2, Please can you add more Manchester dates for the tour? I couldn't manage a ticket

A:

greedy soul for me


Q:

Is the keeping milk fresh with a fork story true?

A:

if kit came out of rkids mouth its gotta be true


Q:

Did you have any inspirations for the new album?

A:

id love to do an out and out punk rock Pistols album


Q:

Taytos or King's?

A:

Tayto's


Q:

What do you listen to in the car?

A:

Classical music