actorartathleteauthorbizcrimecrosspostcustomerservicedirectoredufoodgaminghealthjournalistmedicalmilmodpostmunimusicnewsworthynonprofitotherphilpolretailscispecialisedspecializedtechtourismtravelunique

TechnologyWe are Blockchain Foundry Inc, creators of the Syscoin cryptocurrency, Blockmarket, the World's First Decentralized Marketplace and soon: A revolutionary blockchain token/asset development platform. Ask us anything: AMA!

Feb 26th 2018 by SysCoin • 19 Questions • 254 Points

I’m a physicist and my primary vocation is doing theoretical physics, on paper, by hand. I also have a passion for explaining science, so I’ve written a number of popular science books—about hyperspace, the physics of the impossible, the future of the mind, and more. My newest is about The Future of Humanity: on Earth, across space, throughout time, all the way to our destiny among the stars.

Read more about The Future of Humanity here!

Proof: https://twitter.com/michiokaku/status/966262886883459072

Fire away! I’m ready for your best!

UPDATE: I have to go for an interview right now, but I'm really enjoying this. I hope to come back and answer more questions later tonight. Thank you everyone!

Q:

How does Syscoin make money if there are no transaction fees ("middle man")?

A:

Hey Chris! I have two questions for you:

1) What is your tl;dr version of how we can solve income inequality?

2) What is your most prized possession, something you've had before the FB days, that you have and will never get rid of under any circumstance?


Q:

How did you experience Thatcher's politics? As a photojournalist living and documenting back then you must have witnessed a lot e.g. her cuts in welfare and the falklands war. How did the labour class respond?

A:

Hey guys! Love the show

Two parter, 1 who would be your dream guest (living or dead is fair game)

2 Bowser-centric question, as someone who’s had a somewhat similar beginning to their career as you seem to have had, any career advice for someone looking to get into the creative film/editing/media field?


Q:

Horizon Chase Turbo will have multiplayer online?

A:

What type of cancer?


Q:

What are your top 3 goals currently?

A:

Hello Dr. Kaku,

I don’t hear as much about String Theory as I used to. Are people giving up on it? Are we closer to developing experiments that could prove or further the research? What is the state of String Theory?


Q:

Syscoin is a decentralized cryptocurrency, it does not in effect make money and does indeed have transactions fees which go to miners (although very-low-cost in comparison to marketplaces and even other cryptocurrencies). Syscoin users can gain Syscoin by selling their goods/services on the marketplace or with simply by being a host via the upcoming masternode release

A:
  1. Sometimes the best solution is the simplest: a monthly stipend of $500 to every working American making less than $50k would lift 20 million people out of poverty overnight and stabilize the financial lives of 90 million people. We can afford this by bringing rates on the income of the 1% into line with the historical average of 50%. We know that when people get modest amounts of cash, they use it smartly, their kids stay in school longer, health outcomes improve, and they're happier. We have the power to rebalance our economic system and provide more opportunity to all -- we just have to develop the political will to do it.

  2. My books. I grew up an only child in North Carolina and books were my best friends. From about age 13 onward, I began to collect books to build a "library" of sorts. I carted them around with me from NC to boarding school, to Harvard, and later to California and now New York. They're my most prized possessions and the thing I won't ever be getting rid of.


Q:

I experienced it first hand and covered the coal strikes in the North East of England. And I saw first hand the devastation of mining communities where there was literally no food in many cases that mothers and fathers could put on the table for their children. The police were more like a state agency, administering rough justice to anyone who was opposing the closure policies. The brutality was in many cases appalling and certainly of the same brutality which I had witnessed in Ireland and in other civil wars and riots around the world. I photographed the effects of the strike of both individuals and communities and I saw the levels of poverty into which people were forced. I also witnessed how communities have been divided, between those who worked and those who were forced to go back to work.

The labour class responded with a great deal of resistance on all levels across England. Particularly students were outraged by Thatchers policies and I think even her supporters were sometimes appalled by the consequences of her strategies and her determination to crush the working classes and defeat any opposition to her policies.

A:

Start doing your own stuff! You can't wait for someone to hire you, or bring you into what they're doing. You have to make your own stuff. Shoot a TON of videos, even crappy ones, learn the ins and outs of editing and what makes shots work together. Shoot weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, anything that starts you thinking about how to visually tell a story.

-Bowser


Q:

The game is not gonna have multiplayer online. Instead, Horizon Chase Turbo will offer split-screen multiplayer up to 4 players and the "ghost mode".

A:

I had a neuroblastoma on my spine, essentially the tumor crushed my spinal cord meaning nerve signals cant be sent beyond a certain point.


Q:

For the Foundation reducing childhood death and malnutrition and ending polio would be the biggest 3 things. For innovation it would be an energy breakthrough and improving the way we educate kids. For my family it is making sure the kids are ready to go to college and have a great experience there. That is more than 3 and I didn't mention my tennis goals yet.

A:

Any theory has its ebbs and flows. String theory is so advanced and sophisticated mathematically that we physicists are still trying to find its ultimate form. So string theory continued to dominate the agenda of physics conferences and physics publications, but there are no sensational results that can generate popular headlines. The problem is that the theory is not in its final form, so it has many, many solutions, each one a universe, giving us a multiverse of universes. Which one is our universe? String theory can predict our universes, but it also predicts parallel universes as well. But I personally feel that once string theory is in its final form, we will understand whether or not there is a multiverse of universes.


Q:

What's the difference between Blockmarket and Open Bazaar?

A:

Most critics of UBI don't understand that it doesn't cost $1000 to give someone $1000 and increase their taxes $400. The cost is $600. The true cost of UBI is the net transfer amount, and is calculated in the same way the cost of a negative income tax is calculated. It also requires subtracting out the programs no longer necessary or qualified for with higher incomes.

Read: https://works.bepress.com/widerquist/75/


Q:

Thank you! I’ll definitely check out your book!

A:

I’m well into the events and that sort of thing, I’ll work on trying to start gathering up a group of creative people to make our own projects; that sounds like a solid place to build on!

Thanks for answering to both of you!


Q:

Hi guys ! What can you tell me about HCT ? What new features does Turbo offer ?

A:

Are you in high school or university? If so, what major? If not, what do you plan to do?


Q:

Do you miss anything about your time at Microsoft?

A:

Dr Kaku,

If we make contact with alien civilizations, then what? And how will we talk to them?


Q:

We released the world's first publicly available decentralized marketplace via the Syscoin protocol in August 2014. Openbazaar released their first public decentralized marketplace in 2016.

A quick answer would be that they are very different. Openbazaar uses a Peer to peer service like torrents, while Syscoin's decentralized marketplace is built-in to the provable blockchain.

Openbazaar isn't a cryptocurrency and is developed by OB1, they've had a couple of rounds of private funding, our company, Blockchain Foundry Inc, has received over CAD $5m in private funding (and we are working on going public in Canada very soon) and our token is currently has a $337 million marketcap.

We appreciate and commend all innovations in the cryptocurrency space.

A:

To fund a guaranteed income of $500/month, we would need to close egregious tax loopholes and raise taxes on the one percent to be in line with their historical average of 50% on income OVER $250k. (So if you make $300k a year for instance, you are paying an additional $7,500.) I continually make the case that in the long term, this should serve the interests of the poor, middle-class, and rich alike because it will spur economic growth. A recent Roosevelt Institute study found that a guaranteed income of $500/month to all Americans could add a point every year to our total GDP, a huge increase. That's a level of growth that all Americans would likely welcome.


Q:

Great – let me know if you have any difficulties. Best wishes, David

A:

I don't really have a dream guest...maybe, Dan Aykroyd? -Chobot


Q:

Hello! So, Horizon Chase Turbo is the standalone Console/PC follow-up to the critically-acclaimed mobile game, Horizon Chase World Tour. Actually, this game was redesign almost from scratch to take advantage of all the superior technological capacity of the PC and Consoles. As some examples of top features of Horizon Chase Turbo are the split-screen multiplayer up to 4 players available for all 3 game modes - campaign, tournament and endurance; Ghost Mode; Leaderboard; uncountable hours of gameplay through a total of 109 tracks, 4K resolution, and so on.

A:

I live in Ireland so I'm in the equivalent of the last year of high school. I have had a lot of medical complications over the last 2 years resulting in me missing a lot of school so I'm not going to do well in my end of year tests (which are very important for getting into college here.) I'm still not sure exactly sure what my plan would be for the next few years but ideally it would be get better health wise, then do a portfolio course or fetac course (alternative ways of getting into university but they take an extra year) and then study graphic design and go on from there!!


Q:

There was a certain urgency to everything we were doing to stay ahead that meant the speed of activity was very high. I miss this a bit. I had to take Think Weeks twice a year just to step back and see what the longer term trends were. Now I work on things like malaria where I wish there was more competition to solve the problems and things moved faster.

A:

Let me stick my neck out. I personally feel is that within this century, we will make contact with an alien civilization, by listening in on their radio communications. But talking to them will be difficult, since they could be tens of light years away. So, in the meantime, we must decipher their language to understand their level of technology. Are they Type I, II, or III??? And what are their intentions. Are they expansive and aggressive, or peaceful. Another possibility is that they land on the White House lawn and announce their existence. But I think that is unlikely, since we would be like forest animals to them, i.e. not worth communicating with.


Q:

Has a release date been set for the web-version of Blockmarket?

A:

Hey Chris, how receptive have politicians been to your proposals of a basic income?


Q:

Is there any advice you would like to give to somebody aspiring to be a photojournalist?

A:

have either of you been some place that spooked you out so bad you'd refuse to ever go back?


Q:

Whats the framerate like @ 4k ?

A:

Im in university rn so all the high school stuff is relatively fresh in my mind. If you need any help with your subjects at all, feel free to message me and maybe i can tutor you :)


Q:

How do you see automation affecting our economy over the next 10-20 years?

A:

Hi Michio Kaku, long time fan.

  1. Who are your favorite scientists today and why?

  2. What do you use to keep up to date with local, global, and technical news?

Thanks!


Q:

We have not announced a release date yet. We plan on sharing an update relative to the progress on Blockmarket Web with the Q1 masternode release. We need to let the network stabilize following the hard fork that will accompany the masternode release, after which we'll be in a better position to set dates.

A:

I think like a lot of Americans, politicians are craving some fresh ideas in our politics. Michael Tubbs, the youngest mayor of a major city in the US is leading a demonstration of a guaranteed income in Stockton, California. Congressman Ro Khanna and Senator Sherrod Brown have talked about a meaningful expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit, the framework I argue we should use to build a guaranteed income in America. But we have a long way to go to get back to the early 1970s when the President of the United States (Richard Nixon) and leaders in the House and Senate were supportive of the idea!


Q:

Hi and thanks your very interesting question. When I started out as a photojournalist in the 1960s the world very different place, both photographically and in every other sense, than it is today. However although the techniques have changed significantly at the technology firstly improved, there are still some basic guidelines for those wishing to start on this career. When I left photographic college I was sure the national newspapers would be only too happy to employ the as a staff photographer – at that time the Daily Express, for example, had 64 full-time staff photographers. How wrong I was! After about 60 turn downs I got a job working for a small news agency in the North West of the UK. After a few weeks I realised I could do the same job of selling pictures for myself so came back down south and worked as a freelance for by local newspapers. After a while I became known to Fleet Street editors who began to commission me to cover local jobs. I then moved to Fleet Street and worked from there and from Paris for major magazines such as Life, Paris Match, et cetera. These days I am by no means sure that such a path exists but you could start by seeing whether it does. Develop a good news sense when it comes to pictures which editors will want to buy. Read lots of local newspapers and local websites, listen to local radio immerse yourself in the community as much as possible and cultivate special groups within communities that are most likely to feel affinity with you. For example if you are young then mixing with younger people will probably be easier than older ones. Listen out for any ideas that you could turn into a picture, or better yet, a series of pictures as this will bring in more money. Learn to write so that you can provide illustrated articles or at least well captured photographs which will be far more likely to attract and enters interest than those with little or no text where she or he has to commission a journalist to write the copy for you. You can also try following a specialist route as there are still a number of markets for people with a niche interest, whether this is dogs or horses, classic cars or garden furniture! If you yourself have an interest in any of these you might well find a ready market in the smaller specialist magazines. Once you have gutted with the editor and she/he knows you can be relied upon to provide reliable copy and pictures to deadline you are likely to find yourself with regular commissions. Use this as the basis for expanding your range of interests and contacts. Learn how to speak to people on the phone to set up assignments and persuade those reluctant to be photographed to let you take pictures of them. The more exclusive the images you could provide the more likely they are to sell at the higher the price you could get from them, but don't expect to become a millionaire! If you go to my website www.thewayitwas.com and look at the photographs there this may provide you with some help in identifying what a newsworthy all magazine worthy picture looks like and how it should be shot. If I had to give you just two pieces of advice then getting close – viewers like to feel part of the picture rather than distant observers – and make the key part of the picture stand out from the background clutter as far as possible, for instance by using a long lens to blur the surroundings. Hope this helps and the best of luck for your future. David

A:

Not yet - but I've heard the Hinsdale House in NY has that effect on people!

-Bowser


Q:

The whole developer team is proudly yelling about this one: 60fps!

A:

Thank you I appreciate it! I'll keep it in mind and dm you if I want to take you up on that offer :)


Q:

Automation has been driving productivity ever since the industrial revolution including things like tractors and garment making. With software this will continue to accelerate so we need to think about how we educate people for the new jobs that will emerge. Overall automation is a great thing - eventually we won't have to work as much but we are still at least a generation away from a big change there.

A:

My short list of the worlds greatest scientists are: 1) Isaac Newton, because he created calculus and found the laws of motion all by himself, without using the great achievements of his predecessors (which were extremely few) 2) Albert Einstein, who created Special and General Relativity all by himself, and was the God father of the quantum theory 3) Charles Darwin, because he found the basic principles which go era all living things. As far as living scientists go, of course Stephen Hawking has done path breaking research on black holes. As far as string theory is concerned, Ed Witten of Princeton has been a path breaker and pioneer. Today, its much easier to keep track of science because of great web sites dedicated to brining the best research to the public.


Q:

I'm not on the team but I've put some thought into this one:

  • Public companies are driven to produce profit for the shareholders, this increases the drive for continued development and innovation.
  • Public companies have to produce quarterly reports and financial information, this in turn gives Syscoin a very low level of fraud risk (compared to other cryptocurrencies)
A:

Hi Chris, I think it's wonderful that you're thinking about how to fix inequality. I would love it if you could address the following concerns that people have about universal basic income.

  1. That in order to provide a meaningful amount of UBI to people, the cost for such a program would be out of this world.

  2. That providing universal public goods like free education and healthcare are cheaper and have higher returns on investment -- in addition to providing a greater sense of social cohesion.

  3. That UBI is being proposed as a fig leaf over the actual issue at hand causing inequality, which is inequality in ownership. Would it not be more beneficial to offer every citizen ownership in a fund of American companies?


Q:

Just FYI the link you provided leads to a dead page.

https://thewayitwas.uk/

A:

That being said,are you guys ever afraid if having something follow you home from one of these haunted sites?


Q:

Yeah you better throw me a few free copies too cause you know, I need to get gud. ;)

jk. Game looks promising. I loved playing Cruis'n USA and Exotica and back in the day.

A:

What would be the best way to ask you out? It came into my mind when I saw a very charismatic girl with a big smile on her face in a wheelchair and I thought of just asking her if she wanted to grab a beer with me someday but:

  • didn't want to let her feel I would do that out of pity.. I don't know her and the only thing I know from her (apart from her looks) is that she is disabled

  • normally I don't approach completely strangers because that's kind of creepy. But I know I wouldn`t meet her anywhere else because I don't see wheelchairers in the places I go to often (like the bars I go to)


Q:

Is a cure for alzheimer's a real possibility in the near future, and will it be accessible to people on medicare medicaid?

A:

How do you address critics in the skeptical community who have accused you of toeing too close to the line separating woo from legitimate science?


Q:

Blockchain Foundry is a blockchain products and services company that focuses on building products on top of the Syscoin protocol and enhancing that protocol as needed to facilitate as much business as possible. Going public with Blockchain Foundry will likely bring more attention to the great work we're already doing with Syscoin.

A:
  1. The cost for $500/month to working adults making less than $50k would be just shy of $300bn per year. Let's be clear: that's a lot of money, even in the context of the federal budget. But it's half of what we spend on defense, and just a bit more than the Republican tax bill passed last December will cost. If we can afford tax cuts for corporations and the one percent, let's not pretend that we can't afford a boost to the bottom lines of working Americans who haven't seen a raise in decades.

  2. We need a better education system and smarter healthcare policy. But we also need to be clear-eyed about what works. We have poured more and more money into education and healthcare for decades and have seen only modest gains. But we have a LOT of evidence (which I detail in the book) that the EITC meaningfully improves health and education outcomes for kids. We want better educational and health outcomes, but the data suggests that the most effective way to get them might be through cash. Here's one study comparing the effect of EITC to pre-K investment: https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/this-policy-would-help-poor-kids-more-than-universal-pre-k-does/

  3. Some people argue for a sovereign wealth fund, which I think is a promising idea. Alaska has one, and it is no coincidence that Alaska has lower levels of income inequality than any state in the nation! The tricky thing though is the math: how much money and who gets it? The math is tricky if you want to get to a meaningful level and provide it to a broad base of people. And when people receive it, does it throw them off of other essential government benefits? The EITC is a proven framework that would provide a cash boost now, to the people who need it most, and be in supplement to existing benefits rather than come at their cost.


Q:

Thanks your emailI am sorry that you had some problems but the link does work and even access the site using the URL you sent me. Possibly you could try again.

A:

Nothing yet! - Jess


Q:

Many thanks!

A:

The best advice I can give you is go up and talk to her like you would anyone else! We're really not that different underneath it all! Be considerate of where you invite her like if there are steps in the building, a table that she would have easy access to or cobbles on the route there (cobbles and wheelchairs don't go well together) Hope this was helpful and it goes well for you!


Q:

There have been a lot of failed Alzheimer's drug trials. The good news is that the new tools we have are helping us understand the disease far better - for example the role of the glial cells. I am optimistic that in the next 20 years we will have drugs to help if we stay focused on it including pooling data and helping start ups get funded. I am involved in a number of these areas.

A:

It used to be that research scientists who interacted with the public were criticized. Carl Sagan, in a very embarrassing episode, was actually denied entry into the National Academy of Science by scientists who declared that he was "a mere popularizer," not a real scientist. But times have changed for several reasons. First, the Supercollider, the $10 billion machine that was to be America's premier scientific laboratory, was cancelled because the public did not understand the machine. At that point, it was humiliating to know that scientists had no one who could tell the public what the SSC was all about. After that, scientists realized that they had to engage the public, or else the public would cut their budget to zero. Second, the rise of Stephen Hawking showed that it was possible to engage the public without dumbing down the science.


Q:

One of the adoption challenges will always be the need to purchase Bitcoin and have it exchanged before purchasing goods. We have seen this even recently in the reddit community, users who are new to crypto and want to purchase SYS but don't know where to start. What is the team's plan to overcome this? Are there any goals to leverage non-crypto funding sources somehow?

A:

How do you feel about crypto currencies?


Q:

Do you see any way in which neuromarketing is used unethically?

A:

Hey Jess and Bowser! Long time listener and a huge fan. If you could choose, what would be your top three paranormal hotspots to visit and investigate?


Q:

Do you guys have any tips for a programmer looking to get into the game industry?

A:

Yes, but that's the thing: you are not different at all. But if I approach some average girl at the central station and ask her out she would moooost proably be uncomfortable (and that is understandable). I doubt I will see her again but if I will, I'll just talk to her. I doubt she will be mad, just don't want her to be uncomfortable, that's all. For the rest: yeah, that`s right, would definetly check the location first.


Q:

What technology are you most looking forward to in the next 10 years and what impact do you think it could have?

A:

What are you thoughts on Deep Learning and recent AI trends? Any plans to write an updated version of "Future of The Mind" that would include all the success field of AI has achieved?


Q:

We have begun to address this with the in-wallet instant exchanges Changelly and flyp.me. With our Funding Manager, we can quickly add any funding source to the wallet. We are working to enable fiat-to-sys purchasing either through partners or other Blockchain Foundry products.

A:

I love talking about crypto currencies and how they might work in the future -- and how a guaranteed income might be built into some of them. In my work, I'm super focused on the problems of the here and now and generally leave questions about what the world will be like in 2030 and 2040 to futurists. Right now, most of the Americans who I talk to who could benefit from a guaranteed income have never heard of crypto currencies, including BitCoin. As the reach of the currencies grows and expands, I'm looking forward to a time when we have an even broader conversation about how they might work and how to ensure their adoption ensures broader-based prosperity and economic growth.


Q:

The techniques we were using when I first invented Neuromarketing involved attaching electrodes to the scalps of volunteers to read the electrical activity in their brain while they were being exposed to a particular stimulus, such as a new packaging design all TV commercial. The problems here are that the sample size must inevitably be small which makes the data somewhat unreliable. Second games work in such unique individual fashions that while there are, obviously, commonalities there are also very great differences making the data sets hard to compare. We studied the results intensively for the year before deciding a new approach was needed. My company Mindlab International - www.themindlab.co.uk now employs not only neuroscientists and psychologists but a great number of physicists and mathematicians as well as computer scientists who design increasingly refined algorithms by which to analyse brain responses over the Internet. This means that operating from the Science Park at the University of Sussex we can operate in any country in the world (with a few obvious limitations) and with a large subject set at a four lower cost than in the days of flying EEG equipment around the world.

A:

Jess here - Mine would be: Overlook Hotel in Colorado (which I will be going to this year! YAY!) Salem (even though I know it's super touristy, I want to see it at least once. I can't think of a third...there are so many...


Q:

Start working on your own stuff, maybe participating in game jams, building a portfolio and networking.

A:

Being realistic we are a little bit- but yes your point still stands... I guess all you can do is try to keep her at ease sure the first 5 mimutes of conversation might be awkward but if you get talking you never know :) if you see her again and need an ice breaker simply ask if she needs a hand with anything (getting on the train/bus depending on the station or carrying anything if she's got her hands full) other than that the only advice I'd offer is if you do get a date with her and she looks tired don't start pushing her without asking... imagine someone you just met deciding what direction you're going.... not a nice feeling! Best of luck with it! :)


Q:

The most amazing thing will be when computers can read and understand the text like humans do. Today computers can do simple things like search for specific words but concepts like vacation or career or family are not "understood". Microsoft and others are working on this to create a helpful assistant. It has always been kind of a holy grail of software particularly now that vision and speech are largely solved. Another frontier is robotics where the human ability to move and manipulate is amazing and experts disagree on whether it will take just a decade or a lot longer (Brooks) to achieve the equivalent.

A:

In The Future of the Mind, I wrote that, about 50 years ago, we scientists made a big mistake. We assumed that the brain was a digital computer. Big mistake, because the brain has no programming, no pentium chip, no CPU, no subroutines, etc. In fact, you can remove half the brain and it can still function, yet if you remove one tiny transistor a computer fails. Why? Because, as I wrote, the brain is a learning machine, some sort of neural network. Your laptop today is just as stupid as it was yesterday. But I wrote in my book that eventually scientists will begin to explore learning machines. Guess what. A few years later, now Deep Learning is all the rage. But it is, in some sense, 50 years late. This should have happened 50 years ago.


Q:

Question: What makes it so difficult to finally come up a coherent website with all the relevant information and communication channels integrated? Currently we have information on no less than three websites, no community forum, etc.etc...

A:

Do you think that a guaranteed income can erase years of racism, sexism, and classism in our economy?


Q:

Best books to read on psychopaths, narcissists, and brain washing?

Just so people don't troll me. I am fascinated by the subject. Not trying to be one.

A:

do you believe in ghosts? or the after life?


Q:

How big of a portfolio are we talking? Have an example of a good portfolio?

Great looking game by the way, awesome to have 4 player split screen, such a rarity nowadays.

A:

I have often wondered are there things that are put in place to assist you like ramps, lower counters, tables with open spots that your find less functional or counter intuitive? My second question, is there something small that we can do everyday that would help you?

Thanks for doing this, best of luck on your journey and make the best of it, also welcome to reddit.


Q:

Hey Bill, how much do you know about Quantum computing, and is Microsoft delving deep into that field?

A:

My question is do you think SpaceX will achieve the feat of getting humans to Mars by 2024 or you are skeptical about this timeframe?


Q:

All of our information is on Syscoin.org and the official Blockchain Foundry blog (https://medium.com/@BlockchainFoundry). For realtime chat we also have Slack (http://join.syscoin.org) and we use reddit in place of a community forum (http://reddit.com/r/syscoin). We use these channels as we've found them to be the most well recieved for communicating with the community. We also mirror the information on these sites to our various social channels. We are working on major improvements to the Syscoin and Blockchain Foundry websites as part of the rebranding effort we're in the midst of. The Syscoin website will become a hub for information around the Syscoin protocol for both consumers and developers. The Blockchain Foundry website will focus on the products we're building on top of the Syscoin protocol.

A:

Nothing can erase the shameful history of racism, sexism and classism in our country. But a guaranteed income can be a step in the right direction to righting some of these wrongs. The expanded EITC for people making less than $50k that I propose in my book would disproportionately support the incomes of people of color and women. A guaranteed income by no means is a silver bullet here – we also need equal pay for equal work legislation, to support the #metoo movement, for our leaders to pass policies to address police brutality; but helping to stabilize the financial lives of people struggling to make ends meet will provide stability and opportunity immediately and directly in their lives.


Q:

Hi good question. lots of good books on the subject and I suggest you search for them on Amazon or Google. I have conducted the research into the subject of mind control and have even made a short video on the topic which had a post on the www.thewayitwas.uk Facebook. I have one book which could be a special interest to your studies based on the appalling work done on mental patients by a Canadian psychiatrist in the last decades of the last millennium. I will dig out the title and getting across to you in a subsequent email. Good luck with your searches it's a fascinating area. David

A:

Sort of? I like to think there is something left of us after death, whether that is as a ghost/spirit/whatever...but I have yet to have any firm, concrete evidence proving there is. -Chobot


Q:

Complex question, buddy. I think it all depends on your goals, expectations, etc. And many thanks for the compliments about Horizon Chase Turbo. Cheers!

A:

There is only really one instance that comes to mind about counter intuitive assistance because at least where I'm from (Ireland) things are generally well thought out before anything gets done, and it would have to be ramps that are but in place but are far too steep to use easily. Now if I'm with friends it wouldn't be a problem but if I am out by myself it can be a challenge. As for something small you guys can do yes there is! If you see someone who might be struggling with something ask if you can help! Be it a heavy door, trying to carry things or trying to climb up one of those steep ramps help is always appreciated! However please don't be one of those people that help without even asking... I've had a few occasions of people starting to push me/ take things off me/ try to help me with situations that I didn't need and it just makes an uncomfortable situation for everyone involved.. Hope this was a satisfactory answer and thank you :)


Q:

I spent a month learning the math behind Quantum computing with help from the Microsoft team and a lot of online course material. I wanted to understand how Quantum computers could factor numbers so much faster than normal computers. It is amazing how the matrix math with complex numbers works - nature is doing arbitrary computation but it is tricky to access. These are early days but yes Microsoft is making large investments in quantum - particularly in handling the error problems that most approaches have.

A:

I think Elon Musk has made a great contribution in creating a genuine moon rocket, the Falcon Heavy, and doing it with private funds, so now we have 2 (not one) moon rockets, the SLS and Falcon Heavy. That is what is important. Time tables, of course, come and go. So personally I think his time frame may be a bit optimistic, but that is not the point. The point is that he is making it possible to enter a new Golden Age of space exploration, almost free of charge to the tax payer.


Q:

Regarding adult or legally questionable items for sale in the blockmarket: does the team intend to completely remove these from the UI (obviously impossible to do in the blockchain), or will you be considering an "adult" filter? If not, will you be releasing the source for either BM versions?

A:

Why are phobias prevalent now more than ever?


Q:

Hi Jess and Bowser! I've been a huge fan for three years now, and I must say I really miss Bowsers back yard. I know he moved and no longer has a back yard, but I really hope he will pick up talking about his lil' kitties again soon, any chance of that happening? Peace!

Also, the new facebook group is sooo much fun, so thanks for that!

A:

Is there any hope of an Xbox One version?

(I'm a longtime fan of TG, Outrun, Cruisin', Rush, etc, and I loved Horizon Chase on Android, but I wish I could play it and the upcoming sequel on my Xbox) <3


Q:

What are your long-term goals in life?

A:

What do you feel/know that is one very solvable problem that society (or most likely, government) is ignoring?


Q:

Hi Dr Kaku how long do you think it took for humans to terraform planet like Mars? Are there any physical constraints regarding this? Thanks.

A:

There are currently three levels of SafeSearch built into the Syscoin Core:

1) Public - Open to the public and any UI 2) Safesearch - Listings or Aliases marked as potentially offensive or explicit are hidden behind the safesearch wall 3) Banned - Listings or Aliases can be eliminated from appearing on our UI. Because of the nature of blockchains, we cannot censor anything from appearing on the blockchain. We can only control what appears on our UI. On all Syscoin User interfaces, such as the Blockmarket and the current Syscoin wallet, the user does not see items marked as sensitive by default, but they can choose to display them by turning SafeSearch off.

SafeSearch is VOLUNTARY. Vendors who are selling sensitive or offensive things are encouraged to put their listings behind the SafeSearch wall.

The Sycoin team can also manually move a listing behind the SafeSearch wall. If someone fails to put offensive material behind that wall, we can do it for them. For illegal or immoral things, the Syscoin team can block a listing from being viewed in our interfaces altogether. These blockages would be initiated the instant we become aware of them.


Q:

That's an interesting question. What is clear that we are now much more aware of phobias and that they are not just a flight of the imagination, but a real and life inhibiting problem for a great many people. Let me give you one example:

In the mid-19th century, when a German psychologist named Carl Westphal named "agoraphobia" which is not a fear as many people think of being in open spaces, but of being among other people - it comes from the Greek "agora" which means market place - he reported that he was unable to describe any cases of female agoraphobics, as all his patients were men. What he failed to appreciate, that even those with severe agoraphobia are able to leave their homes quite easily, when in the company of a trusted adult or child. This could be their son, their brother, their parents, and so forth. In the 19th century, the middle class women who formed his patient base never went out unaccompanied, they always had companion. And so they didn't display any of the fear symptoms of agoraphobia. Today, many more people experience new things to which they can become phobic and social structures mean they are always less likely to be accompanied. I think these two factors account for both the greater public awareness of phobias and possibly the increase in phobias to experiences, activities, and situations that did not exist even 30 years ago.

A:

Yeah, we miss his backyard stories too - That said, I have a good cat story that happened to mine. While it's no Bowser's Backyard, it may be a good temp band-aid. -Jess


Q:

Definitely! We're planning to work on both XBOX and Switch version as soon as possible.

A:

The same as everyone else for the most part, live a happy healthy long life, get a job in something I enjoy doing, have a good job in a sector I like to work in. I used to play wheelchair basketball and was asked to train with the Ireland team but had to say no (medical reasons) but wouldn't mind seeing where that takes me.


Q:

I think that health care costs, education and poverty/mobility deserve a lot more thinking and innovation than they get today. The benefit of getting these things right would be amazing. With all the talk about inequity it is interesting that we still work on vertical areas like health, education, housing, food, etc.. as separate things rather than having a full view of the challenges someone faces.

A:

Terraforming, in my book The Future of Humanity, will proceed in slow steps. 1. using lava tubes to form underground bases to protect against radiation 2. mining ice to get drinking water, and oxygen for breathing, and hydrogen for rocket field. 3. using genetically modified plans to thrive on Mars 4. using methane to create a green house effect 5. using solar mirrors to beam sunlight down to the ice caps to melt them.


Q:

Would you guys consider making the slack public, or allowing an IRC or Discord bridge? It is such a big part of the community that casual members don't participate in.

A:

Why in your opinion people think the way they do (or don't)? Is there some pattern associated with some specific type of people based on various variables and how does it affects things?


Q:

I’d probably do the same thing, but it would be worth it. Unless it killed me lol

A:

awesome, thank you! I'll look forward to it :)


Q:

Bot removed my comment because it wasn't a question. So Ill ask a question and make my comment.

How do you feel in reference to other young people your age that are out driving, getting their licenses etc?

Also, how do you stay motivated?

Stay strong!!

A:

Hello Bill ! When did you consider yourself a success?


Q:

After watching 2010: Space Odyssey; what WOULD happen to Earth if Jupiter became a second, tiny, sun?

A:

Since there have been many fraudulent phishing attempts on some of the most prominent cryptocurrency Slack channels such as Syscoin, it isn't possible for us to have an open and public Slack channel. You can, however, send us your email address to get an invite. See: join.syscoin.org.

We also have an open Telegram channel at: https://t.me/Syscoin_Official

In addition, we have a Discord channel as well, but it has very little traffic. We are testing out other alternatives.


Q:

My work was so varied and covered so many aspects of human life that is quite hard to specify any particular topic. Some involve greater technical complexity and risk, such as setting up remote, radio controlled, Nikon cameras when shooting aircraft and car stunts. Others involved a great deal of planning and rehearsal. For example the covert picture I took of a public schoolboy in the UK being caned took 1/15th of a second to shoot and some six months to arrange – so I was mightily relieved when the negative turned out okay in terms of exposure and focus. The miniature camera was hidden up my sleeve and in those days you got one chance to get the picture. But I suppose the area of work where I was most pleased with the results was in 1969 when I spent a lot of time in northern Ireland where the "troubles" had just erupted. I was commissioned by a French magazine to create a reportage of how the violence was affecting the children of both the Catholic and Protestant areas of the city. I stayed with strong families and became very friendly with people on both sides of the sectarian divide. On one occasion I was kidnapped and marched through the streets blindfolded before being taken into a back bedroom for "questioning". Fortunately I had made friends with a wonderful doctor, Jim Ryan, who served both communities for decades and had good friends on both sides of the religious divide. They called him and he vouched for me. At once everyone was a friend again and the lad who had blindfolded me and threatened me with a pickaxe handle beating, even let me photograph the top of his head where you could see the stitching of a wound delivered he said by a member of the hated B Force police squad. I was pleased with the way the pictures brought home to people in both France and the UK how the children were suffering even at this early stage of the conflict. One final set of pictures which caused me great pride with those secretly taken in a Turkish juvenile prison where a British lad, Timothy Davey, was serving a long sentence for drug possession. He was jailed for many years at the age of 14 and sent to an adult male prison! My pictures appears in eight leading UK Sunday newspaper and he freed a few weeks later.

A:

I'd love to do a watch along for a film like HEREDITARY when that is available. Chobot would LOSE HER SH*T.

And I'd love to see a g-g-g-g-ghost IRL.

-Bowser


Q:

Thank you!

A:

Don't worry about it :) Funnily enough I'm in the process of getting my licence at the moment! I've done all my lessons and have my test booked in March! I'm not entirely sure what you mean for the stay motivated part as that is incredibly broad... if you mean to do everyday things, I make a lot of jokes at my own expense about my disability because its one of those situations where if you don't laugh you'll cry! Thank you for the encouragement though!


Q:

There are many domains to be successful in. I was a success in getting good grades and test scores in high school. I was a success at writing good code by my early 20s. The dream of the PC being an enabling tool came true by the 1990s. Now I am working on being a good father and the ambitious goals of the Foundation including getting rid of polio and malaria. I think it is always good to have goals where your success is in doubt and I have that in many areas including the work I do on climate change.

A:

Actually, Jupiter would have to be many times larger than it is in order to become a star. You have to reach what is called Lawson's Criterion in order to create a thermonuclear explosion capable of creating a star. But if we assume that Jupiter were more massive than it is, and attained Lawson's Criterion, then, depending on where it is locate and how big it would be, there is a change that it might (a) disturb the orbit of the earth around the sun (b) light up the sky with two stars, like in the movie Star Wars (c) raise the temperature of the earth and change our climate.


Q:

That's certainly reasonable, thank you.

A:

I'm interested in majoring in cognitive science or neuroscience when I start college next year. Are there any real career options outside of medicine and research? What major/minor would you recommend pairing neuro or cogsci witih for good job opportunities?


Q:

What was the weirdest/strangest event you have ever experienced in your life? Did that event change your outlook all things strange?

A:

How many different gameplay modes would be available for splitscreen play? is it equal with the amount that would be available for single player?

Will we be able to customize any of the vehicles via paintjobs/decals/etc.


Q:

What are your hobbies, and how do you balance time between them and your work / family / other obligations?

p.s. You're a huge inspiration in my life and a role model too! Thank you for everything you do!

A:

Hello Dr. Kaku. I'm a fan of your work and have two questions for you.

  1. What design of spacecraft do you think is the best for long-term space flight?

  2. How do we balance the need to pursue long-term goals and projects for humanity while also dealing current societal problems that people face?


Q:

Our pleasure!

A:

Hi, You have chosen a fascinating, complex and I believe increasingly important specialisation. My own pairing was with clinical psychology as I was interested in helping people with stress, anxiety and similar difficulties. My early studies also involved developing cognitive strategies by which children could more fully and effectively develop their mental powers in the early years of life. You might consider pairing with some aspects of psychology, such as educational, social or as in my case clinical. I guess you are in the States but if you are in the UK I would happily invite you to visit our laboratory and talk to some of our neuroscientists who work with us in a more commercial field of brain studies. I think the whole field is opening up considerably so you could find employment with marketing companies, advertising companies and so on. Do let me know which pathway you select and whether I can be of any further assistance – assuming I have been of some assistance! – once you embark upon your studies. The best of luck in this very challenging yet hugely rewarding field,


Q:

I SWEAR I have seen a UFO late one night while driving back to college from Michigan. It was the section of the road between Toledo and Columbus. 3 strange lights that seemed overly bright and were in a triangle formation - then they jetted off in the blink of an eye - all in different directions. -Jess

A:

All the game modes - Campaign, Tournament, and Endurance, will have the split-screen multiplayer. The cars aren't customizable, but you'll be upgrading your cars while you progress in the Campaign.


Q:

Allocating time is always tough. Tennis is a big hobby for me and I try and play twice a week (a bit more in the summer). I always try and read a few books every month and a bunch on vacation. Melinda and I look over our schedules a lot to make sure we are balancing things well. I travel about 1/3 of the time for the Foundation which I enjoy.

A:

For sub-light speed rockets, I think a. fusion rockets b. antimatter rockets c. ramjet fusion rockets hold the most promise within 100 years. The ramjet, for example, is like an ice-cream cone that scoops hydrogen in space and then fuses it, so that it can run forever without any refueling. For greater than light speed, the details are much less clear, but it might be possible to warp space in 2 ways. One way is via a wormhole that can rip the fabric of space time, which were first introduced by Einstein himself in 1935 with his student Nathan Rosen (so these are called Einstein Rosen Bridges) and also the Alcubierre drive, which compresses the space in front of you, so you hop across vast distances. Also, I think the urgent questions on the earth (e.g. global warming, nuclear weapons) have to be addressed first. No rush in reaching for the stars.


Q:

Are you considering youtube as a means of communicating and giving updates on tech and progress (on a regular basis)?

A:

Do you know when the next on location season will be available?


Q:

What inspired you to make this game?

A:

Hi Mr. Gates! Do you ever like, just randomly get up when you're home and make yourself a peanut butter sandwich? Or do you have people do that for you?


Q:

Hi Michio, if I were to travel to the boundary of our universe right now, what do you think will be there? Is it possible to "fall off" this universe the same way we fall out of our bed? Thanks in advance!

A:

We use many means of communication and have been working on expanding this to many other platforms as well. With youtube, however, we ran into an issue a few months ago(ban with no explanation) and we are hoping that Google will help us with our requests.


Q:

I'm guessing probably sometime in the summer - it depends on when people are available to shoot and edit...but I'd be surprised if it took longer than that. - Jess

A:

Thank you for the great questions! The AMA is officially closed, however, we will do our best to answer any additional questions! Thank you all for your interest in videogame development and Horizon Chase Turbo!


Q:

I do make myself tomato soup sometimes. It is kind of a comforting food and reminds me of doing the same when I was growing up. I don't make sandwiches much.

A:

No one knows. But one possibility is that the universe is a bubble of some sort. We live on the skin of the bubble. If you travel in one direction far enough, you come back to where you started. So the farthest object is the back of your head. In this way, this bubble universe is infinite in two dimensions, since you never hit the end, but finite in three dimensions, since its just a bubble. Likewise, our universe might be infinite in 3D, without boundaries, but finite in 4D, because it is a hypersphere. Sadly, our data is not developed enough to determine if our universe is finite or infinite. But the leading theories (e.g. inflation) seem to indicate that the universe is infinite. But in inflation, our bubble universe can have big bangs all the time, so baby universes can peel off our universe. In other words, we live in a bubble bath of universes, the multiverse.


Q:

Jessica, how did you get to voice Diana Allers from Mass Effect 3 and what was the experience like?

Andrew, do you get a lot of comments about your last name and is it something you learned to deal with?

A:

Is it possible to get in contact with the people responsible for the Windows On-Screen Keyboard? I and a lot of other disabled users rely on it to type but it's missing a lot of features compared to mobile keyboards and even the Ubuntu keyboard.

It takes a lot of time and effort to type like this, it would be great if it got updated so we could type more efficient.


Q:

1 - Telepathy? 2 - Uploading minds to computers?

A:

Bioware just knew I was a huge fan and asked if I would be interested in voicing a cameo character and of course, I said YES (I loved that series and have been a HUGE fan of Bioware for many years). That said, I found the experience TERRIFYING. it was my first time voicing any character at all and I was def out of my depth. -Chobot


Q:

I would be glad to pass along your thoughts on this to the right person at Microsoft - they care a lot about getting accessibility right.

A:

A simple form of telepathy is possible today. In The Future of the Mind, I write that (in epileptics, for example) one can put a patch of sensors directly on the surface of the brain, connect it to a computer, and have software decipher the messages. Then it is possible for this person to type and communicate mentally. In fact, my colleague, Stephen Hawking, using this. He has lost control over his fingers and vocal cords. So in this glasses ,there is a chip which picks up radio signals from this brain, and feeds this into a computer, which then deciphers the message and types out what he is thinking. (This is, however, a very slow process). Also, it is now possible to upload and record memories in mice. Also primates. Next: Alzheimers patients. So they will wear a brain pacemaker that reminds them who they are and where they live.


Q:

You've had some spooky/haunted items in your possession; Do either of you feel like any negative energy has followed you after those encounters?

A:

Tabs or Spaces?


Q:

As we're developing smarter and more effective machine learning algorithms, it seems inevitable that AI will start to replace human intelligence for more precision and efficiency. Professor Michio Kaku, my question to you is will Artifical Intelligence eventually render human labor and intelligence obsolete? If so, in what areas can humans excel at that machine learning algorithms can not?

A:

Nah. I honestly haven't felt anything creepy from anything yet. -Chobot


Q:

When I code I use tabs because you want the columns to line up. For some word documents I use tabs. You want things to adjust when you go back and edit them and tabs help.

A:

Right now, robots have the intelligence of a bug. They can barely walk across a room. Simple tasks done by humans (picking up garbage, fixing a toilet, building a house, solving a crime) are way beyond what a robot can do. But, as the decades go by, they will become as smart as a mouse, then rat, then a cat, dog, and monkey. By that point ,they might become dangerous and even replace humans, near the end of the century. So I think we should a chip in their brain to shut them off if they have murderous thoughts. But what happens centuries from now, when robots and evade even our most sophisticated fail safe system?? At that point, I think we should merge with them. This may sound strange to some people, but remember that it is the people of the far future (not us) who will decide how far they want to modify themselves to deal with supersmart robots


Q:

What are your favorite shows from years past that highlighted or touched upon the paranormal? Mine were Sightings and Unsolved Mysteries.

A:

What are the most promising new ways to fight malaria?


Q:

Do you think EVERYTHING that exists could be explained through mathematics and physics?

A:

YES!!!! I was just watching Unsolved Mysteries re-runs on Lifetime the other day. Also loved watching In Search Of w/ Nimoy. -Chobot


Q:

Malaria is a super important area for the Foundation. The number of deaths has been cut in half using bed nets and spraying and new drugs. For the future we need new tools since resistance is developing to all the current tools. We don't have a vaccine that protects for long enough to help out yet but we are investing heavily in one. We do a lot of modelling to understand which tools would help the most. One that would be new is called gene drive which would reduce mosquito populations for a number of years to make it easier to clear the malaria from all of the humans - this will be ready for field testing in a few years

A:

There are things which science and math may have difficulty explaining. As Galileo once said, the purpose of science is to determine how the heavens go. The purpose of religion is to determine how to go to heaven, i.e. the purpose of science is to explain natural law, while the purpose of religion is ethics, to determine what is right and wrong, to be nice to each other, how to behave, etc. So science by itself cannot dictate what is absolutely right or wrong. There is no law of physics that tells us what is proper behavior and what is right or wrong. It all depends on the society you are talking about.


Q:

Hi! Huge fan of you both and the show/podcast. You both have a lot going on every day in addition to BS - do you ever foresee a day where Bizarre States is your full-time gig, all day err'day? In whatever form(s) it takes?

A:

Hi Bill! What do you think needs to be done to ensure that everyone has adequate food in the future?


Q:

Dr. You study string theory. For someone who is scientific illiterate can you explain this study?

A:

I would love it to be. I think getting a TV show deal from it would be the best way, so who knows - but that would be glorious! -Chobot


Q:

There is some cool work going on to make meat without using animals which will be far more efficient.

The Foundation is funding research on improving photosynthetic efficiency and the potential there is huge.

If we can get African productivity up then we will be able to feed the world but we need to innovate to help them have much better seeds.

A:

Briefly, each sub atomic particle we see (and there are hundreds of them) are nothing but tiny vibrations of a string, a rubble band. So each particle is just a musical note. That explains why we have so many particles. Then physics is the laws of harmony of these strings. Chemistry is the melodies we can play on these strings. The universe is a symphony of strings. And the Mind of God, that Einstein searched for for the last 30 years of his life, is Cosmic Music resonating through 11 dimensional hyperspace.


Q:

Hi Jess and Bowser! Would you ever consider doing a cross-over show with another podcast? If so, which ones would you pick?

Lots of love from Belgium! Jaana

A:

Hey Bill!

What were you like in your early teens and what would you change about yourself back then?

Did you know you wanted to be a software developer from an early age? What helped you in picking your career path?

Were you always confident you'd be a successful software developer or did you have some self-doubt?


Q:

How do you respond to criticism that your comments are sometimes over reaching?

What impact do you feel that has on science communication?

A:

I don't see why not. I'm a big fan of LORE although we have totally different tonality. -Chobot


Q:

I first saw a computer when I was 13 and it fascinated me then. I spent a lot of time figuring out what programming was - first Basic and then machine language. By the time I was 16 I got a job programming at TRW which helped me learn even more (skipping part of my senior year). So I was lucky to have something I loved to do and which became more important in the years ahead. I have had self-doubts about all of my skills but programming is one I have always had a lot of confidence in.

A:

I am a futurist, in that I have interviewed over 300 of the worlds top scientists (many Nobel Laureates) who are inventing the future in their labs. So my predictions are based on the latest scientific research. But some people come up to me and ask "where is my flying car?" But the prediction of a flying car did not come from a scientist. It came from a cartoon show. Unfortunately, most people's understanding of the future comes from cartoon shows and science fiction movies, which have no obligation to be scientifically correct. So I personally feel that we need more scientists to engage the public concerning future technologies which will affect their lives in the future (e.g. AI, biotech, nanotech).


Q:

Jess, you talked about an old wooden roller coaster in WV that ruined all roller coasters for you. Would that be the Big Dipper at Camden Park? Might also explain your fear of clowns. Camden Park

A:

If you were born into a low-income family, do you think you would have managed to become as rich as you are now?


Q:

Hi Doc! do you believe there is a God?

A:

Maybe. I was so little, I honestly don't remember. This would have been in the earl;y to mid 80s though, so if it was around then, then probably. - Chobot


Q:

I benefited from having a great education - public schools through 6th grade and then a great private School (Lakeside). So there is a good chance I would never have gotten turned on to software and math the way I did and therefore not as successful.

A:

Einstein was asked this question. He replied there are two kinds of Gods. The first is the personal God (that answers prayers and smites the Philistines). He did not believe in that God. But he did believe in the Old One, i.e. the God of Spinoza, the God of beauty, harmony, and order . The universe could have been ugly, random, lifeless, but its not. So he believed in the God of order.

Sorry for the two answers...just getting the hang of it.


Q:

Is Kyle’s hair really as silky smooth as it looks on camera?

Is Dan as much of a goofball behind the scenes as he is on camera?

When will we get to see more behind-the-scenes footage of mini-Chobot underfoot? (Yes, I know, mini-Chobot has dad’s last name.)

Edit: You should sign your answers to make it clear who is writing which answers.

Double edit: looks like you’ve been editing your responses to do just this, IGNORE ME! (Or ignore my edits anyway, I still want my main questions answered. :-P )

A:

Is it true that if I forward the email in my inbox to 100 people you will give me money?


Q:

Dr. Kaku, may I expand on that question:

  • Which relatively "godlike" beings/civilizations would you deem possible? (e.g. "we're in a simulation", "super-aliens watching us" [& fermi-paradox], "beings of higher dimensions", type 3++ civilizations, classical religion [our existence is a divine test], etc.)

  • If we eventually (want to?) make contact, could they have "higher" ethics or will universal "Good vs Evil" continue?

A:
  1. No. it's usually pretty snarly because he's going to a "beach" look.
  2. Occasionally.
  3. Not often. I try to keep him out of the office unless I am strapped to get a sitter. -Jess

A:

I get asked if the aliens are evil and want to destroy us. Maybe, but I think in the main they will be peaceful because they have had thousands of years to resolve sectarian, fundamentalist, nationalist questions. However, they still might be dangerous if they simply don't care about us and we get in the way. In War of the Worlds, the aliens did not hate us. We were simply in the way. In the same way that a developer is a threat to forest animals because he can pave the first, the danger there is from someone who sees that we are just in the way. But for the most part, I think they will be peaceful, but view us like we view forest animals.


Q:

Are you concerned that since Chris took the id10t podcast away from Nerdist, it will have an effect on your listenership?

Also, what was that thing that always almost chased me out of my Grandma's basement?

A:

Who is your favorite celebrity?


Q:

Dear Dr. Kaku,

  • Are you worried that science & tech evolve way faster than we can "mature" as a species?
  • Are most people even ready to hear what this century holds in store?
  • How would you envision the most profound societal leaps (culture/religion/education/etc.) for better or worse?

Thanks so much for all your work!

A:
  1. Nope! Chris' podcast has nothing to do with ours.
  2. Probably a goblin. ;) -Jess

Q:

Melinda and Warren are my two favorites followed by Bono. Most celebrities I don't know very well. I do get to meet a lot of political leaders and Nelson Mandela was the most impressive ever. Jimmy Carter is also amazing.

A:

Yes, Einstein worried that our technology could outstrip our humanity. Personally, I believe that the danger lies in the transition from a Type 0 to a Type I civilization. We are still a Type 0 civilization, so that we still have the savagery that typified our rise from the swamp. However, we are about 100 years away from becoming a Type I planetary civilization, where many of our sectarian, fundamentalist, nationalist divisions have been resolved. So, if we can survive until the transition to a Type I civilization, we might just make it.


Q:

What supernatural ability would you like to have?

A:

What is the best book you've read in 2018?


Q:

What have you found to be the most effective method to help to change the minds of individuals who are firmly anti-science?

A:

MIND CONTROL (all day/every day)!!! -Chobot


Q:

There are two amazing books. One is Enlightenment Now by Pinker and another is Factfulness by Rosling. They are both very readable and explain that the world is getting better.

Edit: I recently wrote about Enlightenment Now on my blog: https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/Enlightenment-Now

A:

Sometimes it is futile to argue with someone who, for deeply ideological and personal reasons, is against science. But one way to win some of them over is to explain how the wonders of modern technology, which have more than doubled our life span and lifted us from poverty and disease, have benefited us. Modern medicine, for example, would be impossible without evolution. The space program and telecommunications would be impossible without understanding basic astronomy. Then explain what our world would look like without science, when we lived to only 30 years of age on average, when most of us died of starvation and plagues.


Q:

Onyx is the best, and I loved welcome to the shadow zone! Maybe the wrong place to ask, but when will season 2 be out??

A:

Is it possible to make the world economy grow without destroying our planet's resources?


Q:

No word on it yet! Hopefully we'll know soon.

-Bowser

A:

Yes - essentially most resources don't get "destroyed". The elements that were here to begin with are still here. Of course it takes energy to recycle things but I am optimistic we will figure out how to avoid destroying the planet. The number of babies born has already peaked which will help limit the maximum population size.


Q:

Onyx is my spirit animal! Anyone who wanted to get plastic surgery to look like YuGioh are ok in my book!

A:

Hey Bill. First off, thanks so much for everything you do for society. You've turned your profound success into opportunities for millions more to succeed.

As for my question - I completely agree with the stance you and Melinda discussed in your annual letter, where you stress that the onus of owning future change lies in the hands of the greater population. Too often, though, I feel that even though hundreds, thousands, or sometimes millions of people can hold opinions and strive for change, corporations still hold the vast power for change. You touched on it briefly in #7, but how do you convince corporations to look beyond short-term equity growth into the big picture of their role as changemakers within an increasingly border-less world?


Q:

Thanks! Actually, that was just for a Halloween photoshoot to promote stuff at Unique Vintage ( a clothing store here in burbank), so I'm not sure if it's going to go anywhere outside of that. Send in any stories to: [email protected]

-Jess

A:

Each corporation has to look at what capabilities it has and how it can use those to help people in need whether it is research or tiered pricing or having employees volunteer. When I was in Scotland I met with people at an NHS hospital there who had paired with a hospital in Zambia and it was amazing how much they helped save lives by visiting and supporting their colleagues. I think creative things like this where individuals get involved can make a big difference both locally and internationally.


Q:

Any chance yall will ever bring Bizarre States to Austin, especially with SXSW going on!? I already have plans to be at the NERDIST Bash! I would die to hear a live podcast!

A:

Do you think in the near future, we will have another financial crisis similar to the one in 2008?


Q:

We've def looked. I actually went to the museum of the weird that was around there and saw their show - VERY FUN! And I know there are a few haunted places there too which might be worth looking into. If nothing else, I'll be taking pics and posting on Insta & the B States FB group & page. -Chobot

A:

Yes. It is hard to say when but this is a certainty. Fortunately we got through that one reasonably well. Warren has talked about this and he understands this area far better than I do.

Despite this prediction of bumps ahead I am quite optimistic about how innovation and capitalism will improve the situation for humans everywhere.


Q:

Jess, how did the DICE Awards go? Was flying private as awesomely cool as it looked?

A:

Bill,

Can you discuss how the Jimmy Carter foundation has shaped your view of philanthropy?


Q:

Hahaha! it wasn't REALLY private - it was just a "boutique airlines" that gives you the illusion of that. Which was great in MANY ways, but those planes are small so you feel every bump!

DICE went great overall. Despite what chats say, the crowd there was fantastic and having a wonderful time. I think things really gelled this year :) Plus, it's always wonderful to celebrate the debs and publishers for their hard work. - Chobot

A:

President Carter showed us how to work in Africa and how to partner with groups like WHO through his work at the Carter Center on a number of diseases. I have had a chance to talk with him at length to get his advice. He is great at giving credit to partners to help them stay engaged in the work.


Q:

Hey Bill, what’s your favorite beer?

A:

I am not a big beer drinker. When I end up at something like a baseball game I drink light beer to get with the vibe of all the other beer drinkers. Sorry to disappoint real beer drinkers.


Q:

While the Gates Foundation is tackling several major issues, it seems like transport is an important issue that is overlooked. Specifically, the impediments of inadequate transportation or inefficient transportation is a major contributor to a number of issues including poverty, vaccine delivery, education, etc. Having spent over 25 years in the transportation analysis field, I keeps coming to the same conclusion that transportation is an important, but undervalued issue in bettering the human condition. Has this been tackled or discussed within your circles?

A:

I think the private market rewards innovation in this space quite well. I think electric cars and autonomous vehicles will be great things. The Foundation is experimenting with drone delivery of medical supplies with a grantee in Rwanda and Tanzania. I am not sure the hyperloop concept makes sense - making it safe is hard.


Q:

Hey, What do you think about increasing economic inequality in the world? What do think is wrong in system that is causing such an economic inequality? What do you think should be done about it?

A:

I think the safety net and equal opportunity need to keep improving. 100 years ago there was basically no safety net at all and it is getting stronger. I am surprised more countries don't have Estate taxes since they redistribute wealth and avoid dynasties.

Our economic system has created the wealth that we can now do a better job sharing in an equitable way so our system has done amazing things during the last 200 years despite its flaws.


Q:

Thank you for stopping by.

I have two young girls who are very interested in STEM activities, and they have a wonderful mother who is a mechanical engineer. I work in customer service and am not a massively technically inclined person. With all of the technology that you've been involved in, can you point me in any direction that might help me connect with my girls on that level?

A:

My wife Melinda is working with a lot of people on this. Engineering work involves working with people a lot and it is great we are trying to get more women involved. Some professions like medicine have changed to have more women but the hard sciences and computer engineering have been harder to change.

There are groups like Girls Who Code or Code.org or Anita Borg institute that work in these areas.


Q:

how different do you think your life would be if your name was Gill Bates?

A:

Why is this question so popular? Hello to all the Gills out there. You probably run into someone with the same name less than I do. I don't think my name has affected me much. My formal name is William.