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I'm Jake Ganz, leader of Studio Yotta. Ask me anything. (Part 2)

Mar 18th 2018 by jakeganz-yotta • 13 Questions • 400 Points

My short bio: You might know of Studio Yotta from the Rick and Morty x Run the Jewels music video that we animated for Adult Swim.

My Proof: https://twitter.com/jakeganz/status/975204656107307008

Q:

How do you keep yourself motivated as an animator?

A:

here are some answers from a couple animators who worked on the RaM/RtJ video:

Nick Leong: it's much easier if you consider it a discipline rather than a motivation thing since motivation comes and goes but discipline is consistent. Like how you never forget to brush your teeth I hope

Sandra D Rivas: it's motivating when you work with friends, at least from my experience

as for myself, i'm not much of an animator lately, I'm more managerial now. but, if i had to say, i would say that the best thing that's helped me is keeping my eyes on the prize, whatever that prize may be at any given time. different things work with different people, but obsessing is what works for me.


Q:

How long did it take to make the video and what program did you use to animate it?

A:

the video took about 3 months for full production, start to finish including revisions. we use Flash to animate.


Q:

What is your "easy to learn, hard to master" part of animation?

A:

i don't have a good answer to this, but here's an answer from yotta animator JesusAcHe:

"The more I know about animation, the more I realize how little I actually know."


Q:

I've always wondered how animators, especially ones like you guys who, individually have artistic styles that are mostly unique and don't exactly match, manage to maintain a specific visual look throughout a production like this. Is there ever concern about people not being able to produce frames or sequences that fit the guidelines for a project? How do you manage that kind of thing?

A:

that is always a concern. it depends on the needs of the project — some projects require strict adherence to model, while others are more lax about it.

sometimes to get it totally right, one of our artists (usually Joel) will go in and lay out one key for every shot, fully on-model. when this is not possible or not deemed necessary, we'll draw up redlines and give notes.

every animator is different, and some struggle with adaptability to the model more than others. personally, i feel that if you have the reference visible, you can nail most things by just eyeballing rapidly back and forth between the ref and your drawing as you go. people usually always draw things a little different, but the most important thing to keep in mind for drawing on-model is proportion.


Q:

Where's part 5 anime?

A:

i was just listening to an acoustic cover of "chase" and wondering the same thing yesterday...


Q:

Where do you find your inspiration?

A:

working with good people. collaboration is what matters most to me.


Q:

Piggybacking off of this question, would you say there's a place for illustrators in the animation industry (coming from someone who regrettably got a degree in one, and not the other)?

Also, would you recommend any tools/tutorials for people starting out in animation, that already know how to draw?

Thanks for doing this, the work you guys have put out has been fantastic! Very inspirational!

A:

it's hard for me to speak too much of the industry, since yotta in some ways is its own thing — but if you're good at drawing and you're willing to adapt yourself and gear yourself toward a specific goal, i believe you can find work in this field.

as for resources, animator's survival kit and flash are good places to start.


Q:

Hey Mr.Ganz, How exactly is Studio Yotta ran as an animation studio? Do you guys have a physical HQ, or are yall mostly ran as sort of a collective of internet animators/artist that submit work digitally? Seeing you guys go from starbomb videos to material like rick and morty and Ok K.O. is really inspiring. Hope yall keep doing dope stuff!

A:

a handful of us are based in one place and work together in close proximity. many other people we work with communicate with us through online channels like e-mail and Discord.

originally we were 100% online, and that works really well for not getting destroyed by overhead costs early on, but i believe in getting people together in person, so my goal is to build a group of the most compatible, loyal and likeminded group of people in one location while supplementing with a solid community of participants online.

and thanks, me too!


Q:

Which animators are currently involved with the studio?

A:

it alternates, but our credits give decent insight:

https://twitter.com/jakeganz/status/975158005250617347


Q:

How did you start out your career animating? Was it something you started out doing for fun, or did you always have big dreams in mind?

A:

i started as an inbetweener. i think i always wanted to do something like this, and when i started my actual career i very specifically wanted to see my efforts grow into a business, but i would argue that things you start out doing for fun are always things you're going to do a better job at.


Q:

Oh I got 2 questions!

1st, What's a common mistake you see a lot of animators commit?

And 2nd whats your favorite RTJ tune?

A:
  1. poor spacing. varied timing/spacing typically looks better, but to an even greater extent i've had a lot of people apply and their spacing doesn't even account for settle. someone once told me that if your animation doesn't have slow-in/slow-out, the audience will not recognize it as animation. i have found this to be pretty true.

  2. sorry for the basic answer, but i have a lot of attachment to "Oh Mama" after working on this video.

However, my pipeline co-director Joel/Lenkalamari's answer is "Early".


Q:

Do you personally take part in animating (i.e.: do you do Key-frames, in-betweens, etc.)? If so, what is your favourite thing to animate? If not, what used to be/what do you think would be your favourite thing to anime? [E.g.: Walking, fight scenes, panning shots of scenery, fluids, etc.]

A:

i hadn't for a while, but i actually did the other day for the first time in almost a year. i like animating effects personally


Q:

I follow your work and Im a really big fan. I aspire to work in your studio sometime <3

My question is, I dont have the option to attend animation school, but I really enjoy doing it. What is the most efficient way of teaching myself and reaching professional levels? I feel like I do a lot of dumb misktakes.

A:

study your favorite animators closely and draw/animate as much as you can. i've said this in other comments, but i definitely recommend the animator's survival kit!